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6

Bananas like to grow in temperatures between 26-30 deg C, in high humidity, which means your 45 degrees is a bit much for it, particularly if it's in an unshaded position. They grow best in 'jungle' conditions, meaning with other plants giving some relief and shade from hot midday and afternoon sun. They also don't like being exposed to a lot of wind, so in ...


6

I'm not sure if what you've been told is entirely true - what is true is that the new leaves and fruiting stems emerge from the centre of the plant, pushing their way up through existing leaves, so its possibly true that you risk damaging new growth you can't see by trimming existing leaves. The advice generally with banana plants is to let withering or ...


5

I'm concerned about the size of pot too, and it looks as if not all the potting medium has been watered properly, some looks very dry, some damp. Because of that, its hard to say whether the plant is beginning to suffer from low humidity or insufficient water. You describe the plants as 'tiny' - if the rootballs were also tiny, bear in mind the pot you use ...


5

I grow a lot of these sort of plants that are 'subtropical' and bring them in. I think you need to either: Provide a relatively warm place with lots of light This will allow it to grow properly during this period. Provide a cool to what-you-may-consider cold (though not freezing or below) area where light is not as much of a concern (though it won't ...


4

Well, your questions are answered by the icons you posted a picture of. The crossed out knife-and-fork icon suggests that you cannot eat it. (The circle with the diagonal line mimics the 'prohibited' sign, which can also be found in traffic signs or 'smoking prohibited' stickers.) The Musa Nana (dwarf banana) is a often used as a synonym for Musa ...


4

You can't very easily - I'd dig around the base of the actual plant and isolate the root/shoot that goes into the lawn and cut that off below ground, together with any others which are straying where you don't want them too.


4

The way I see it there are 2 options to keep this plant growing, but both are going to involve cutting the top back. First, I need to point out one important fact that makes this possible: Banana plants are not trees. Trees are woody perennials. Bananas are herbaceous perennials, much like any perennial garden flowers you might have (hostas, daylilies, ...


4

Putting it on the compost gets my vote every time. In the research you did, you probably discovered that banana peels contribute primarily potassium, with only small amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and magnesium. Because different plants have slightly different requirements regarding levels of different nutrients, most requiring nitrogen in balance with ...


4

Pathogenic e-coli are known to be able to reach the tissue of some vegetable plants which is why it's not recommended to use raw manure as a fertiliser, but I'm not aware that anyone has ever detected pathogenic bacteria getting into the roots of trees and making their way into fruit. They might get blown onto the skin so one might wash the fruits after ...


4

It seems to be Hedychium gardnerianum or Kahili ginger, originally from the Himalayas. Here an example on wiki. It is not a banana, it is actually a member of the ginger family Zingiberaceae. It is poisonous for grazing animals.


3

The banana plant forms a stem which is actually a pseudo bulb made up of old leaves and in nature it matures, flowers, fruits and dies back to the underground rhizome which keeps making new stems. There are two types of pups, a sword pup and a water pup. The former has a much larger root mass which allows it to be separated from the parent, but the water ...


3

On the assumption you mean 30 deg F and not 30 deg C (which would make leaving your banana outdoors impossible), I think a little more insulation round the pot and possibly over the banana plant itself is called for, although it's not entirely clear to me whether your sun porch is fully enclosed, or actually open to the elements. I don't recommend you cut ...


3

Banana trees have male and female flowers, on the same plant. Many vegetables and fruits plants are polyploid: this is a "genetic defect" which produces additional copies of chromosomes. More copies means more proteins which means larger plant/larger fruits. But then the plant is also more dysfunctional (so it needs help [active cultivation] and often ...


3

The growth rate depends on the climate. They'll grow super fast in tropical areas, but only a couple feet a year indoors in a temperate area. The problem for you is that they mature rather big. The smaller dwarf edible bananas mature at 5-7', but most will grow 12-25 feet tall or more with leaves up to 9' long and 2' wide. If you intend to plant them out, ...


2

Where do you live? How long have you had these plants? How long have they been planted in your garden? To move them now if they are not root pruned and acclimated to the indoors will be risky. Depending on how much time you have before the first freeze, you need to use the time you have left to give your plants some transition support. First you need to ...


2

Without more input from you the best advice would be to cut the leaf off at the trunk. Do not pull or strip. Please send a photo or at least some sort of response...


2

If I see a plant that is fruiting, and could do with a bit of potassium, then I'll take any banana peels that we have, blend it with some water (any stick blender), and then pour it around the roots. I then cover it with a little dirt. Covering it stops flies. Blending it reduces it to very fine particles increasing the surface area to bacteria, and worms, ...


2

Leave it alone. I wouldn't have cut it back. The banana draws those nutrients back into itself as the leaves fade away.


2

Musser's given an excellent answer, but there's a few other factors you should consider for your big potted plant: Miracle gro comes in a variety of different NPK formulations. You might want to check online for what formulation your type of banana, or bananas in general favor. Also, premixed fertilizers are usually sold without Calcium and Magnesium salts ...


2

I have a few concerns, each of which may not be huge things, but together they can take a toll on your plant's health. Room: Do you have enough room for it? These are big plants when mature, and even if it isn't touching anything, if the leaves are constantly getting brushed against, by people walking past, etc, that will hurt your plant. It should ...


2

What is too big about it? It's height or breath? You can cut back a few leaves or shorten them. It will be somewhat ugly that way, but it will not suffer the die back or trunk cut back and will be fully ready to come back in the spring.


2

My suggestion for the reason would be nothing more complicated than a pot too small, poor soil and irregular watering. You might like to read up on a feature of the Bahamas called "banana holes" which tend to emphasize that banana plants appreciate room to spread their roots and good rich soil that along with the ability of the hole to catch water then ...


2

Banana trees/plants grow differently from trees, as they are large herbaceous plants (genus Musa) . The upright part that seems like a trunk consists of the bases of their leaf stalks/petioles, which are tightly curled together circumferally. This pseudostem grows from an underground rhizome (the visible part of the base above ground is called the corm). ...


2

The banana is the tropical equivalent of herbaceous perennials in the temperate regions. Their normal pattern of growth is to fire up vigorously during the vegetative phase, produce flowers and fruit/seeds, then the top dies back as the plant stores resources in the root ready to sprout out in the following season. In the temperate zone this is governed much ...


2

Hydrate the soil immediately and introduce it back into sunlight similarly to new seedlings Finally getting water will not shock the plant; it needs it if it's going to be getting sunlight again. If the soil is hydrophobic like mine was you'll want to soak it somehow. I usually do this by submerging the entire pot in a 5 gallon bucket, or something similar ...


1

It may be powder mold, If it's mold, mildew, fungus, you need a good fungicide, I'd recommend a metal based one. In a pinch, cinnamon will knock it back..


1

I have bananas. Gran Naine (Chiquita). 2-4 inches seems remarkably slow to me for growth. I would check the soil pH first. Like citrus, bananas like 5.5-6.5 of well-draining soil. If it's too wet, or the pH is too high, you won't be able to absorb certain nutrients. If your leaves have purple regions between the veins, your plant is not absorbing phosphorus ...


1

It may depend on where you are. In E TX , zone 8, they grew almost a foot per month ( in summer). Although I had small stalks of small bananas , We never had the 14 months of warm (or not cold), weather it took to ripen them. It was an interesting plant for conversation.It should send up at least two new plants each year as the original tree will die after ...


1

I grew banana plants from a (free) root again this winter. Got 6 pups (sprouts). When the leaves overgrew my growth chamber, about 3 feet, I cut them down to within a few inches of the ground. It is NOT spring here yet. All the pups are growing back.


1

I would not be concerned about the bacteria absorbed by the plant but rather any solvents, petroleum or heavy metal contamination that might have occurred in the water and then absorbed into the plant. Since it's not a huge crop of bananas, I would not be so concerned and if the plant and fruit did absorb some quantity of bad stuff, it won't kill you or make ...


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