16

Herbs (and leaf vegetables in general) must be harvested regularly and not left to mature too much or too soon. Here are a few tips to harvesting herbs — mostly paraphrased from these two answers of mine — that'll help you keep a good availability of herbs for most of the year. Harvest the young leaves There's a reason why grocery stores only sell the ...


15

There are a few 'advantages' to growing plants via hydroponics. It is mostly just a way to grow plants in a different environment (indoors, or in a non-native environment). Just like growing vegetables in a greenhouse wouldn't per se be 'better' than growing them in a field. There are advantages to both: a greenhouse allows you to grow things that aren't ...


10

Given the previous answer, which covers hydroponic growing, I'll just add an explanation of how it's possible to over water a plant which is growing in potting compost, and thereby cause plant death or disease. The key is in the word 'clean' - hydroponics requires clean water, principally. When a plant has its roots in soil or compost, this isn't clean in ...


9

Lettuces don't need a lot of light to grow. I recently read "The Winter Harvest Handbook" by Elliot Coleman and in it he describes growing lettuces in the winter in Maine (Zone 5) in the dead of winter underneath two layers of insulating row cover. They don't grow fast as in summer, but they do grow. The nice thing about leaf crops (which lettuce is) as ...


8

The reason you are not finding the answer you are looking for in regards to the lumen requirements of crops is that lumens is a measurement for humans. It is based on the level of light that we can perceive. Plants mostly require light in wavelengths of around 430,450,650,675 nano meters (depending on the crop), with highly varied intensity requirements ...


8

The seed coat is hydrating. Perfectly normal, just not usually seen when germinating in soil. having played with "germinate on a wet paper towel and carefully plant with toothpick" method, I've seen it. Here's a lovely poster (pdf) (of the science conference type) by Dongfang Zhou, Monica Ponder, Jacob Barney and Greg Welbaum of Virginia Tech - far more ...


8

These are called by various names but the one I am familiar with is LECA. It stands for Lightweight Expanded Clay aggregate and is made by this company. Having seen this material used in twenty and thirty year old installations I can attest to its durability. Lightweight? Not so much.


8

That look like Hydroton, which explained above is expanded clay. It is highly porous and holds moisture very well, and is used in a lot of Deep Water Culture/Aquaponic/Hydroponic applications.


8

I would not recommend it, but I think you should ask this question in your siste site: https://parenting.stackexchange.com/. The problem I find with this "gifts": these are very very slow to grow (so very boring for a children) very difficult to see a live trap of fly (or a digestion of I fly). IIRC two per year should be enough for the plant. It is ...


7

Well, for root crops, you need a substrate, and of suffient depth, to support the roots. Root crops are very nicely grown in an "ebb and flow" system. This set up alternately floods and drains the growing media on cycles. The cycle times are matched to the rate of development of the plants so they have enough water, but enough air-time for the roots as well. ...


7

I have had excellent indoor results with two T5 fluorescent tubes per 8 heads. The most important thing about the lights is that you must get 6400 Kelvin (+/- 300) wavelength lights. They are not the most common you will find. Place the lights about 10-20 cm from the plants (only do this with fluo or LED lights, not Metal Halide or HPS bulbs) When the ...


7

It looks like nitrogen and potassium deficiency to me. From Chapter 4, Soil fertility and crop production of the book Plant Nutrition for Food Security - A guide for integrated nutrient management published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: Deficiencies indicated by symptoms appearing first on older leaves chlorosis ...


7

Garlic can be grown hydroponically with artificial light and a substrate. However you have to work against the normal life cycle of a bulb which is to grow, flower and have a dormant period. I planted garlic bulbs from the fridge and they grew very quickly, so quickly, they exhausted their stored reserves in the bulb and died. To actually get a harvest ...


7

I think you are referring to a hydroponic clay aggregate known in Europe as Hydroton where it is manufactured in Sweden. It may also be called Geolite, HydroKorrels, Hydroleca or "grow rocks". Other products such as growstones, which are made of glass, tout themselves as a superior products. Commercial growers often use rockwool cubes or trays to start ...


7

Yes, Mint is one of the most responsive plants to use by cutting. Cut just above a set of opposite leaves and 3-4 in. down from that for one cutting. Mint is very invasive, as long as you provide the right conditions it should continually be the same as the previous cutting. Just cut the flowers off and don't let it go to seed, this would go from cloning to ...


7

Read all you can about indoor growing & seek out varieties that are know to do well in containers. (Example 1: Datil Pepper) (Example 2: Pineapple Rocoto) (Example 3: Bhut Jolokia / Ghost) The most important things for you will be light & nutrients (a good fertilizer applied properly & at the correct intervals). Get a grow light (Example 1) (...


6

I've built my own aero tank from an Ikea storage box and a 24V pond fogger. I started with these instructions and made a few tweaks and refinements over time, and the thing works quite well. Since there is no pump, and the fogger is perfectly quiet, all you can hear is a soft tinkling of water drops (the fogger knocks up a spray as well as fog). Add a grow ...


6

Theoretically you can induce most slips (of an asexually reproducing plant) to root in just water as long as the water is extremely aerated, the right temperature and the proper pH. Most plants that can reproduce asexually don't need nutrients from soil to start roots for a limited time. Once they slip/seed has used up its stored energy source it will need ...


6

"Soil-less" doesn't necessarily mean "liquid", though I often think liquid when I hear hydroponics. See, for example, this page on growing hydroponic carrots: Medium hydroponics systems require a physical substance for the vegetables to grow in (in this instance, perlite), whereas solution hydroponics systems only require a liquid nutrient solution. ...


6

It's a Chlorophytum comosum, commonly known as Spider Plant. It's not a 'hydroponic' plant though - the fact that it survives in water when you're getting it to grow roots is true of many plants. It will, though, prefer to be potted up into a growing medium eventually.


6

"If I leave the garlic in the jar with no soil and just a little bit of water (about an inch), will I end up with usable garlic?" In a word - NO. There is only enough energy stored in a typical garlic clove to get the new plant off to a good start on producing its first set of leaves and roots. If you do not give it access to more nutrients, either ...


6

Looks like root rot, probably caused by an oomycete called Phytophthora (genus). Wikipedia says: Root rot can occur in hydroponic applications, if the water is not properly aerated. This is usually accomplished by use of an air pump, air stones, air diffusers and by adjustment of the frequency and length of watering cycles where applicable. That is ...


6

Plant number one is a Rhapis excelsa palm, a real beauty.They grow well in bright diffuse light but will tolerate periods of low light. The die back at the ends of the leaves is natural. Just take a pair of scissors and trim it off leaving a tiny margin of dead material on the leaf so you do not cut into live tissue. Plant number two is a Dracaena Janet ...


6

This is debatable. So there is no clear answer and lots of opinions. You can theoretically derive hydroponic fertilizer from 'organic' sources and not synthetically produce them (from chemical rather than biological processes). But whether this is an organic method is debatable. That is: Is growing plants without a biological soil, an 'organic' method? ...


6

Any moist material placed against the stem of a plant can cause stem rot which is why you are not supposed to put material against a transplant higher then the original soil interface with tomatoes being a well-known exception. I am guessing you're using coir, and it's remaining moist and lying against the stem. I use hydroton in my flood and drain system, ...


5

Restaurant supply houses offer a wide variety of food grade equipment that can be repurposed. I also see food grade containers like totes and olive barrels available at my local recycler. A supplier like this has a wide selection however they are not pretty. If you want something that does not look industrial you need to find an outdoor pond or even a koi ...


5

Sweet potato slips root readily in room temperature water near a light source. The slips are 8" cuttings from the growing tips, with all of the completely mature leaves removed. Tomatoes are also easy to root this way. Change the water and rinse the roots in room temperature water every other day for best results. Peppers take longer, but they will root. Fig ...


5

There are quite a few benefits that comes with growing plants in soil-less culture, for example Less space required Less growing time required Labor and garden maintenance is reduced Water conservation Nutrients are recyclable Save money by recycling nutrients Pest, weed, and disease problems can be controlled easier Plants grown hydroponically ...


5

What are you doing for pollination? They do self pollinate, but without wind nor insects it can be hard. I only overwinter my habanero plants indoors, but the best I've got from fully indoor flowers has been 3 habaneros from two different plants. All of them had about two to three viable seeds, so I could be wrong but I'm assuming it's more a matter of ...


5

CFL is compact fluorescent lighting. It's basically a low energy using spiraly bulb. You can grow with them and you're correct that you would probably want at least one each of the 2700k and 6500k bulbs. These numbers are referring to the colors the bulb is putting out. One is going to be a warmer color and will be your reds and the other will be the colder ...


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