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11

The carbonates and oxides that are left by the burning of wood can be used to neutralise acidic soil as wood ash is highly basic. It will contain all the elements that were present in the wood except those lost as gases such as nitrogen and sulfur. Hard woods contain large amounts of calcium whereas soft woods have very little. Interestingly North American ...


9

Assuming this is wood ash from a wood burning stove. As a rule of thumb, wood ash contains 15-30% Calcium Carbonate (Lime), 3-8% Potassium (Carbonate and other salts), 1-3% Phosphorus and other trace elements depending on where the wood was grown. It changes the pH the same way as applying Lime will, being alkaline, it raises the soil pH. It's a good idea ...


8

Fertilizer is commonly rated with an NPK ratio. The P stands for phosphorus (technically, P2O5), and it is the amount (percent by weight) of the fertilizer. So in a bag of fertilizer that is rated 4-10-6, the amount of P2O5 is 10% w/w. The amount of phosphoric acid (H3PO4) in coke (original = 0.089%) (zero = 0.147%), and (vanilla = 0.147%). Source. Pound ...


7

Measuring the pH of soil is cheap and super easy (I do this often). Get a (plastic) bowl. Put a sample of soil in it. Add distilled (not rain or tap) water and mix it to the consistency of a milk shake. Wait 30-60 minutes, until the soil settles and you have mostly water on top. Test the pH of the water/supernatant with a pH meter or litmus strip(s). ...


7

The best way is to get a soil test. If you can find a COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE via the closest University, it is cheap and possibly free. Otherwise there are cheap tests like the ones used for HOT TUBS. There are also these pronged things that seem to work well. I own a very expensive pH tester and test these other cheap LOWES or HOME DEPOT pH ...


7

Full sun - most vegetables like as much sun as possible, although in very, very hot countries, some shade from the midday sun may be beneficial.The berries falling doesn't matter either way, but they'll be a pain to pick up.


7

I would stay clear of paper (eg. Litmus paper) and indicator solutions (eg. Universal Indicator). Paper strips are only a simple "is it more acidic than X" or "is it more alkali than Y". Pigmentation from the soil can also pose a problem. Soil colour and suspension will be the problem with the solutions. A well designed solution such as Universal Indicator ...


7

There's no particular reason to think the nutrient level would be high - the only way to know is to do a soil test - contact your local agricultural extension office and get a soil test kit, follow the instructions for collecting samples, send it off, then you'll know what you have and what you don't, and how much. While blueberries are definitely out, many ...


6

If you are gardening for fun not for profit, its not that important to focus that much on "PH". Your land is unique. You can't come up with the perfect solution the first year. It will take time before you know what to plant and when and where. So you will have to make several tries and be a good observer. If you can afford it, by a truckful of organic ...


5

Miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) belongs to the Sapotaceae family, and you'd need host roots from a plant within that family, though whether there are any suitable or compatible isn't something I know. But why not grow it in a pot - it's said to do well and fruit in containers, given the right conditions, even though it won't achieve its full, in the ...


5

Standard recommendation for 50 years or more (I have old books) has been to line concrete beds that will be used for acid-loving plants. In days of yore that would have been tar/asphalt type material - these days EDPM rubber (also known as pond liner, also known as rubber roofing) is a somewhat friendlier approach with very long life.


5

In short, no, it isn't possible to alter your soil's ph by growing particular plants - if your soil is chalky, choose alkaline loving plants to grow in it and avoid acid lovers, or grow those in pots in acid potting soil (ericaceous planting soil). Soil profiles and their acidity are largely determined by geography or area, that is, what underlies the soil,...


4

Well, if you only did it yesterday, it's not a problem - what could be a major problem is surrounding the rootball with manure. Go and get some ericaceous compost if you don't have any. Turn the Camellia out, remove the manure, empty the pot completely. If you really must use manure in a pot, make sure it's well rotted and smells just earthy (personally, I ...


4

This is an easy one. Downspouts are usually next to concrete foundations and having the water flowing over a concrete shield...alkaline. The lime in concrete affects the soil near the foundation raising the pH. This is the worst place for acid plants. I understand, I think, that you thought lots of hydrogen atoms that would make the soil more acidic. ...


4

Lowering soil ph isn't a one off treatment - it needs to be ongoing, with frequent soil tests to check its not getting too low. Sulphur is the safest from a planting point of view, but takes longer to work in cold weather. Aluminium sulphate works more quickly, but its easy to overdose - it can build up in the soil to toxic levels, and reduces phosphorus ...


4

A chunk of my garden is acidic, mostly dry shade, so here's what does well for me: Groundcovers: Lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) - may require more water than you have under the trees, Wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens), Partridge berry (Mitchella repens) - afternoon sun could be a problem with this one, though. Perennials: Trillium, Uvularia (can ...


3

The crux is that its not just about the amount of iron in the soil. It has to be in a form that the plants can absorb. Plants mainly acquire Fe from the rhizosphere. Although Fe is one of the most abundant metals in the earth's crust, its availability to plant roots is very low. Fe availability is dictated by the soil redox potential and pH. In ...


3

You could apply a foliar spray of chelated iron once or twice a season, but that's not fixing the problem which is the soil pH is not allowing the plant to access the nutrients in the correct proportion. It's very unlikely to see iron deficiency in soil itself, and like you, I have chelated iron on hand for my aquaponic plants which do get iron deficiency. ...


3

I can offer up two suggestions to enrich your soil. The first option is to mix horse manure and chicken manure (3:1) in your existing soil. I use store bought manure but since you are planning to use fresh manure, I would be careful in terms of what vegetables you plant in them for contamination concerns. The second option is to use compost (homemade or ...


3

Okay to get right to it, no, most of those listed nutrients aren't practical to test for at home. That said, you can get test kits, for basic info about levels of N,P,K, and pH, but they will not cover all the other elements you were asking about. Basically, if you want to do that yourself, you'll have to actually build yourself a lab. It would be expensive,...


3

One of the most common reasons of tomato plants shriveling up are fungal diseases. The spores live in the topsoil and can get on & infect the leaves by falling raindrops. (Sounds complicated, but actually the "splashing" rain drops just propel the spores upwards.) Some kinds can even survive on porous substances like wooden stakes and re-infect new ...


3

Carbon dioxide easily dissolves in water, creating carbonic acid: H2O + CO2 <===> H2CO3. This will soon reverse the effect of aeration, relowering the pH. So it's best to wait until the water pH is stabilized in the particular environment. After the mixture is ready, test the pH and let it sit for ten minutes. If it stays the same, there is no necessary ...


3

About the only thing that will acidify soil over a period of years, and keep it so, are certain trees, mostly conifers, though it varies between species. The variation is accounted for by the presence of calcium in the leaves - the lower the calcium content, the more acid the soil will be. The link below might be of interest on this subject http://www....


3

Acidic soils are great for potatoes, blueberries, hydrangea...but most vegetables do better in more neutral soils. There are no plants that actually DECREASE the pH of the soil PER SE. Whenever organic matter decomposes some acidity is produced but nothing that would make even a temporary change in the soil to make even blueberries happy. The best way to ...


3

Take a handful and mix it in a cup of distilled water or some other low mineral water. Stir and let it settle, then check pH of the water. Quantities are not critical. I use bromthymol blue—it is a liquid used for aquarium water. The range is 7.4 to 6.0, as I remember. I have never been a fan of the paper test strips, although I had unlimited access to all ...


3

Pretty cool system you have there, it looks very sophisticated! You say that the lights go off at midnight and back on at 6 am. You can indeed see a bit of rise in pH during that time, but I see more fluctuations, what happened for example at 18h on 5 December? Overall the pH stays somewhere around 6-6.5 so I would not worry about it. But your question is ...


3

You want to acidify your soil, so sulfur because that is used to make sulfuric acid.


2

Well, I suppose there's spagnum moss, but that will take even longer than the pines @Bamboo mentions, and it's not so much the growing as the decay that does most of the acidifying, though a certain amount of "locking up calcium and magnesium" is mentioned in the wikipedia article. While the classic commercial blueberry barrens are lowland bog-type ...


2

I'd like to know where you read that - the only thing I can think of is if you plant a lot of coniferous trees such as pine - the needle drop from those will increase pH of soil and any water courses nearby. You may be confusing agricultural crops with trees - persistently farmed land may finish up with an altered pH which then needs correcting. So far as I ...


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