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7

Bolting in the fall is the normal time for lettuce to go to seed. To gather seed is a bigger more complicated task. If you didn't purchase viable seed or if that seed is GMO just will not work at all. The other thing is that you won't know the genetics of that seed. Producing seed takes growing identical plants in a big group, ideally in a hermetically ...


7

Lettuce is finicky and prone to bolt due to the heat. Once it bolts, it's done. Here's what I'd do: Save the seeds from it. They can be planted. When I've grown lettuces - leaf ones, not head lettuces - I'll make cuttings and there will be some regrowth but once it goes to seed the growing year is over. And the leaves that are there will likely be ...


7

Ants are in no way harmful to your vegetable plants. With at least one caveat. They love to raise and promote aphids. So cute, really. Lettuce is easy 'food' for aphids but rarely will you see aphids on lettuce unless there is nothing else available and/or they've been PUT there by ants! Look for tear drop shaped crawling insects. They can be bright ...


6

I believe I found the answer after searching around a bit on this site: http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/research/biosystematics/invertebrates/invertid/list_category.asp?Ca_ID=10 I think they're called Ladybird Larvae, but please let me know if anyone thinks differently.


6

Taste it. Usually when lettuce bolts it's time to pull the plant, as it turns horribly bitter. If you like bitter lettuce that may not be a problem for you. It commonly happens as the weather heats up in summer, so if you got all the way to fall you did well. Seed saving for lettuce probably makes very little sense with your garden size - indeed, you might ...


5

It does sound quite hot for lettuce germination. For those of us in the US, that works out to 62F at night, 81F during the day. Grand Rapids is an heirloom variety from here where I live in the Great Lakes region, where lettuce is grown in the spring and fall. That means temperatures generally hover in the 40's at night (around 4-8C) and only get into the 60'...


5

Unless you are interested in harvesting seeds, it makes sense to cut off the top. I had to do that for my lettuce as well. I also noted that the leaves from the lettuce started tasting bitter right around that time. So, I ended up removing the entire lettuce plant and replacing it with something else since space is always limited.


5

Peas and lettuce are very hardy and can handle a few frosts. Green beans should wait until it warms up. Other plants you might consider are spinach and kale, which are also both very hardy. (This is not an exhaustive list of good candidates for early spring planting, but I've had good experience with these.) The challenge you will face is that seeds will ...


5

In addition to Stormy's answer, the other possibility is that the ants are looking for water. Lettuce and chard leaves often trap drops of water even in hot weather, and as a result are used as a source of water by ants, bees, and other insects.


4

Yes, you can. Don't try to separate the plants, plant them in groups as they are potted. The biggest issue I see is the potential to bolt, which is high under the proposed conditions, at least for tired crowded plants. If you don't mind, you can remove all but the healthiest seedling at the base, to provide better conditions for the remaining plant.


4

That doesn't look like a slug, because it looks like it has segments. I think it's a caterpillar. And that looks more like caterpillar excrement. But if it is an unusually marked slug, it will be slimy. Caterpillars are dry, and have legs. Whatever the case, good job finding it. Getting rid of it is easy and disgusting. You should pick it off (you don't have ...


4

Lettuce seeds show "high-temperature inhibition", or, plainly put, won't germinate at temperatures over 85 °F / 30 °C. Considering the fact that they are native to the Mediterranean, that's a wise mechanism: summers tend to be dry there and the seeds would be at risk of drying quickly. While they will germinate between 40 and 85 °F / 5 and 30 &...


4

Control the lighting so it never exceeds 12 hrs. And keep it cool, below 70 degrees F if you can. Why you growing it indoors though, that's not usually done.


4

Mealybug is my guess but they are usually warm season bugs and it's a bit early for them. They are sucking on the plant juices by clustering on the veins of the lettuce leaf. Or they could be aphids that are whitish. Aphids come in a lot of colours. Frankly it doesn't matter what they are, you need to control them. A good hose down followed by a spray of ...


4

I would go ahead and plant them, but if you want to be safe, you could try planting some of them now, and save the rest just in case. I do this often when I gamble with the early spring weather. Lettuce and peas can stand very cold weather, and will probably survive even if the weather turns around and gets cold. Green beans will germinate better produce a ...


4

I don't know anything about hydroponics, so I can't answer the part of your question about "knocking off" time for growing hydroponically. When seed packets say "matures in XX days", they're referring to the time you put it in the ground. For plants that are usually directly planted (e.g. corn, beans, carrots) this is the time between putting seed in soil ...


4

The classic viability test for is to place a counted number (10, 20, 50, 100) of seeds separate from each other onto a damp paper towel or blotting paper, supply them with optimal germination conditions as far as temperature and humidity are concerned and wait the standard time for germination. After that, count the number of seeds that show signs of ...


4

There is no right answer. It is up to you: How many pots, seed topsoil and space do you have How expensive are the seeds (some varieties are very expensive) How do you feel eradicating double seedling (but healthy) I tend to be more in the: "one seed, one pot", but commercial farms tend to consider seed cheap, but labour most costly, so they tend to put ...


3

technically bolted means run to seed prematurely. as opposed to flowering and seeding by usual time for species. factors for bolting include unusally long hot spells, drastic fluctuations in weather over few days, poor soil structure and/or soil moisture problems, unbalanced chemistry due to fertilizer use, crowding, improper handling of seedlings when ...


3

Plants require 14 essential elements, and it sounds like you're only going to provide nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium and sulphur. You also need to dissolve the constituents with distilled water unless you can compensate for the Ca, Mg, and S in tap water. Plants require 14 essential elements in the root zone,including the ...


3

I would pull it out of the ground and replant. Cutting it might spur some regrowth, but I think the leaves will be bitter.


3

We provide commercial hydroponic systems and the channels that we use are made from virgin HDPE and are 2" X 4". The 2" depth is perfect for romaine and butterhead. They don't fall over and will grow from seed to harvest in about 6 weeks. Go to the American Hydroponics website to see the full line of commercial hydro equipment.


3

I havent seen this exactly before, but it does look like that soil is very wet... not sure if it is some sort of moisture retaining soil, but if it is, I would mix it with some sort of normal garden soil mixture... or peat or something that doesn't have polymer gelling agents... make sure you have good drainage, and replant. it also looks like there could ...


3

Very well looks like that could be slug/snail damage. If you have a small amount of lettuce plants then just going outside at night with a flashlight and hand pulling off plants and the ground will be sufficient. Or putting a small cup full of beer will attract and subsequently drown them. This is probably all you need. I grow a lot of lettuce and ...


3

The fluffy stuff (puffs of white cotton) is ready for harvest, they are attached to the plant very mildly when ready. If you take the fluffy stuff and it lets go/ detaches they are ready. In nature they will be taken by the wind to find a new spot to grow next year, so be sure to be one step ahead of the wind. After reading Giacomo's comment (thanks!), I ...


3

The problem is you're eating them when they're at the rosette stage - they actually reach a foot high if left to grow on, and at that point, the problem of soil getting into the rosettes is much reduced. This salad green is sometimes available as part of a mix of cut and come again salad leaves sold in supermarkets - these do not have the issues you ...


2

When my red leaf lettuce bolted this year it tasted very bitter, to the point of making me gag; and I like Arugula. When the Romaine bolted, the higher the leaf the more bitter it tasted. I have pulled all our lettuce plants now, and will try to replant some soon. This is my first year with a vegetable garden in about 5 years; and at a new house and in new ...


2

The bitterness is caused by heat. Lettuce likes cool temps, where they don't often get over 75F, if you don't want them to get bitter. When the heat becomes more consistent, certain chemicals are created for flowering, and producing seed. This is what causes the bitterness. You cannot fix this batch of lettuce but you can grow another batch and keep temps ...


2

You question appears to be asking about unopened flowers rather than seed heads, I'm not sure that's what you mean really, you have to wait for seed to form, which necessarily means the flower has opened and been pollinated. If you collect or plant lettuce seed when its immature, it won't grow, which suggests burying the immature seed heads won't do a thing, ...


2

Well, your lettuce looks very good for the middle of summer, especially for somewhere as hot and dry as San Francisco. The dry tips on the older leaves look like they were caused by heat and/or a lack of humidity. Giving it lots of shade is good, and it looks like it's been watered well. What you can do about heat is limited, but you could screen it during ...


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