12

The aloe is not growing in that medium. Sugar dissolves, rice and coffee decompose, when exposed to the conditions required for a healthy root zone. They would sour and kill the plant roots. Not suitable at all for growing plants in. It's either temporary, or someone doesn't know what they're doing, or the plant is in an inside pot. What you could do, if ...


8

That look like Hydroton, which explained above is expanded clay. It is highly porous and holds moisture very well, and is used in a lot of Deep Water Culture/Aquaponic/Hydroponic applications.


8

These are called by various names but the one I am familiar with is LECA. It stands for Lightweight Expanded Clay aggregate and is made by this company. Having seen this material used in twenty and thirty year old installations I can attest to its durability. Lightweight? Not so much.


5

Usually, bare root plants are supplied with wrapped roots - that might be burlap or fabric or some plastic, so hopefully that's what they've done. When you get them, soak the roots in a bucket of water for at least 2 hours, then plant out. If its a good supplier, they may come with instructions, and these often tell you how long to stand them in water for. ...


4

There are two issues here the container and the plant: You can try Phyllostachys bissetii which is a runner type that is hardy to around -20 degrees celsius. It is shallow rooted and suitable for containers. The main problem I see is that this plant wants to be 16' tall (~3.5 metres). Unless you have an unusual balcony the plant is likely to be thin at the ...


4

Well firstly well done on buying such a spectacular plant! I have six, now seven as I bought an interesting one yesterday. I've been growing them for a number of years now, at least eleven and am slowly discovering what they need and don't need, though I haven't managed to kill any yet. All of mine are grafted onto japonica stock. The first one was a tall ...


4

No, you don't reuse rockwool cubes. You can't remove a plant from a rockwool cube anyway, so it should get planted with the plant. If (for any reason) the plants died in the cubes, you don't want to reuse them anyway, because they will be full of decomposing roots, which will often harbor disease, even if the original plants didn't. Allelopathy is also ...


4

Well, I'd still highly recommend composting. You don't have to improve the soil all at once, but most common edibles just have not evolved to grow in poor soil - they've been bred over generations and generations to be pampered a bit. I'm not sure what your motivation is for choosing fertilizer over compost, but you'll actually be kinder on your native soil ...


4

I collected seeds from Launaea arborescens when I was on Fuerteventura 2 years ago. I sowed 20 seeds in a transparent plastic container. In the cover plate I drilled some holes for ventilation. 50% of the seeds germinated. The plants grew quickly, but surprisingly, they looked like Hawkbit rather than Launaea arborescens. When I separated the plants after 3 ...


4

I saw a planting in Mexico of bougainvillea where the soil depth was about six inches. The planters were six or eight feet long. It looked fine but as J. Musser says if you don't irrigate then the soil dries out pretty fast. If you are using a soil less mix and shallow planting depth the big issue is some plants are going to die out. Edges and corners are ...


3

He's talking about pasteurizing wood chips or straw using immersion in water to create an anaerobic environment to kill off the aerobic bacteria and fungi. Then he removes the water to expose the wood chips to air and inoculates them with mycelium. With no aerobic competitors, the mycelium then runs rapidly. This is a known method of pasteurizing without ...


3

I checked with a local hydroponic store and their suggestion was clay pebbles, I washed them before filling the buckets (there was a fine dust on them). It has been couple weeks and the pump is clean. I hope it would help others to choose a growing media.


3

Grow beds can drain parallel or serially but in the latter case a failure anywhere affects the whole system and not just a single bed. So, if for example you were using bell siphons, and one of the siphons stopped working, then water could potentially all dump into one grow bed and never leave. There's also the issue of solids which accumulate inside the ...


3

Figs respond well to "Air Layering". Essentially wrapping the branch with soil while it's still attached to the tree. It will root into the soil and then can be cut off and planted.


3

I highly recommend winter hardwood cuttings. If you girdle the branch 30 days prior to taking the cutting you will have a higher success rate, but even w no girdling and no hormone you can easily get 30%. Best is to take them in situ where you want them to grow permanently. Loss on transplantation can be quite high unless you leave them potted up for at ...


2

100% coffee grounds will not make a great soil, you should mix it with at least 50-75% other soil. Also, coffee grounds are fine for plants that like a bit of acid (azaleas, rhododendrons, tomatoes) but will be bad for other plants. You should also check your soil pH to make sure it's a good range for the plant that will be in the coffee grounds. I got ...


2

I think you're not really asking if this is soil, which requires inorganic materials ( ground rocks ) with some organic matter ( humus ), but whether this mixture is suitable medium to grow your tomatoes. There are many different types of media including those used in hydroponics ( just water alone ), flood and drain systems which use gravel, and expanded ...


2

Looks like Jasmine of some sort. If it is, and it is probably easy to experimentally propagate in any case, just cut off some of the lower leaves, dip in rooting hormone, and wrap it around a damp toilet/paper towel and put it in a vase or even a pot with rich soil.


2

There are one or two golden rules if you want to try to strike a cutting from a plant - the first is, choose a piece without any flowers, preferably between 6-10 inches in length, usually a side shoot. The second is, you must keep the cutting from drying out, so if it cannot be immediately dealt with, then it should be kept in a sealed plastic bag to prevent ...


2

I'm just a little south of you in the Seattle WA area, and there are tons of options when it comes to bamboo that will thrive around here. For planter use, I'd recommend a small clumping variety, like Rufa. It will be plenty hardy, can tolerate shade, and grows 7-10ft. You'll need to keep the watering up, at least until it is well established. It would be ...


2

Dark Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp.) having a place with Class Basidiomycetes and Family Agaricaceae is famously known as 'dhingri' in India and develops normally in the mild and Most regularly found on deciduous hardwoods and tropical woodlands on dead and decaying wooden logs (trees that lose their leaves). Beech and aspen trees are normal. Sometimes found ...


2

The Rock wool used for insulation hardly absorbs any water and hence probably is not suitable for hydroponics. Also, the one purposed for hydroponics is PH neutralized and properly treated for contamination. However, there is a variety of choice of growing media in hydroponics. There is no stipulation of using any specific media in hydroponics. Most ...


2

It looks like classic tip burn from too much light and heat. Combine with the overall small leaves and this points to either lights too close to the plants, the wrong type of light generating large amounts of heat, or having the lights on for too long. If the plants are exposed to 24 hours of light and heat they have no chance to respire properly; they have ...


1

There is a saying regarding woody plants: First year, they sleep; second year, they creep; third year, they leap. In other words No growth the first year, a little growth the second year, and typical growth (or slightly better than typical) the third year. Seeing no growth on any shrub four weeks after planting is typical and normal.


1

Nice idea. You'll have to be careful buying. Fleece: "the coat of wool covering a wool-bearing animal (such as a sheep)." There's a lot of "fiber fill" out there these days. Usually made from some water repelling strands. None that I've seen (wife makes pillows/quilts) will soak up water the way you want. Quilts used to come with wool fleece, when people ...


1

Usually it is much better to produce compost, and use compost as amendment of soil for your vegetable garden. The problem of decomposing stuffs is the heat: decomposition will create a lot of heat (you may see on lower layers some ash). In addition fruit flies and very different composition over time will make growing stuff difficult. When it is "ripe", ...


1

I noticed a big difference this year compared to last as well. I grow both Borlotti bush and Kentucky Wonder pole beans; the Borlotti germinated and grew on pretty much as last year, but the KW came up weird this year, not as bad as yours but yellowish and slow. Last year in almost the same soil they were absolutely picture perfect. Solid green all the way ...


1

I am very glad you felt something was wrong! The only soil that should ever be used in pots is sterilized potting soil. These water holding gimmicks go AGAINST great drainage. Fertilizer added to the soil means you'd better know what you are doing with fertilizer and include what it was that was added. Far better is to purchase potting soil without these ...


1

I've seen this or something like this used in propagation labs, but that is a very limited circumstance and the new plants are quickly moved to more "normal" media once they make roots. It looks like the inventor/manufacturer is trying to broaden the commercial appeal. This is what I found: Plant gel is a water-absorbing polymer such as a polyacrylamide (...


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