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13

Looks pretty healthy to me. A lot of plants in the mint family get purple stems as they mature. It's not unusual to have a mix of dying, seeding, and new growth intermingled in common mint. Even when the whole of the plant seems to have died back, you can still have new runners appear from underground later. Common mint thrives along riverbanks or under ...


9

From the question, it sounds like your mint plant is too dry. Mint plants in pots are very sensitive to the moisture content of the growing media. They prefer very moist, but not saturated soil while growing. Also, mint plants like lots of light. In low light conditions they will stretch and become weak, which would cause the falling over. Also, the lower ...


9

Well, seems you'll have a lot of thinning and pricking out to do if they all germinate. If you imagine each seed as a single mint plant, which needs 18-24 inches of space around it as it grows on, if all 50 of your seeds germinate, you will need to transplant each one into individual pots, so in theory, that's 50 pots. If you sow too thickly, or too many in ...


9

Mint leaves are just fine to use any time, including after the plant has flowered. The flavor may not be quite as strong as it was before it flowered, so you may need to add more leaves to your jelly infusion to get the same taste. Be sure to cut the flowering stems back when you harvest. Cutting the flowering stems back may even encourage your mint to ...


9

Seems like your culprit is smallish. Candidates would be caterpillars Check for their droppings - greenish or blackish "pearls" - or the animals themselves hiding either under the leaves or along the stems. Simply pick them off, no chemicals needed. slugs or snails tend to leave slimy traces - search and remove like caterpillars. bugs rather unlikely, but a ...


8

Yes, transition shock to a degree, it should have been hardened off before being left out all the time, not only to acclimatize to colder, variable temperatures after being indoors for some time, but also to get used to direct sunlight on its leaves. It is not, however, dead - turn it out of its pot, split or select live parts from what's there, removing ...


7

Cut a little stem and pinch off the bottom set of leaves. Then place in a clear glass. Roots should start to form in about 4 days.


7

The spinach seedlings are far more fragile; I'd recommend moving the mint. You can do it anytime, but the sooner the better. As you have just planted the mint, it should come out fairly easily. Be as careful as possible, and don't disturb the spinach seedlings. Repot the mint normally in a new container, and refill the hole in the mix for the spinach. I'd ...


6

Mint leaves can be used at any time when green, but they have a stronger flavor before flowering. This is true of many related plants. I usually let my mint flower, to attract bees and butterflies, and remove the flowerheads before they set seed, but you can cut the flowers at any time. If your plants seem to be developing seeds, cutting the plants back ...


6

It sounds like you've got veggies growing in the plot right now? I think then for this season, hand-pulling the mint is your best option. Once the veggies are out, I'd cover the area in sheets of plastic (either black or clear) And secure the edges so it is flat against the ground. It will take several months to kill the mint, but eventually it will be ...


6

When taking cuttings from a plant, I try not to take more than 1/3 of the current healthy growth. For some plants, you shouldn't take even that much. As has been mentioned, mint is very prolific and a fast grower, so you should be just fine taking around 1/3 of the currently growing, healthy young branches each time you cut. Also, mint can be propagated ...


6

Like your coriander, you may be overwatering your mint as well. Although mint likes moist soil, the key here is "moist" and not "wet." Unless you are experiencing very high temps and very low humidity there, then every day is probably too often to be watering your plants.


6

Mint does this when constrained within a pot - its natural growth habit is to throw out long runners up to 18 inches under the ground and pop up a good distance away from the original clump, which is why its so often said its not a good idea to plant it in open ground. Turn it out of its pot, cut the root ball into 3 sections, replant one in the same pot. ...


6

I remember your first question about this plant, and have just checked the image you provided then, where it looks much healthier than it does now. I note also you posted a comment under that question to me, but didn't ping me so I didn't know it was there, so didn't respond. As you know, I don't think this is regular mint, I think its Mentha pulegium, and ...


6

Pull or cut off all the dead material, soak the pot so it's wet through, let it drain down, wait a week or two, see if it grows. If it does, you would probably need to turn it out of its pot, cut it in half and repot one of the halves, but you need to establish whether it's live or not first. UPDATE Looking at your new close up photo, it looks like there ...


6

To answer your title question, true leaves usually appear in 2-3 weeks. Those seedlings look like they need more direct sunlight. From your photo the seedlings, especially those in the red container are quite leggy, some even falling over. Tall, thin stems are a sign the seedlings are stretching to find more sun. You mentioned in a previous comment ...


6

I have never grown mint from seed. I always get a little start instead. But I was pleasantly surprised you planted them in small pots! That is usually the biggest mistake. What I am seeing is too much water. Part of a healthy soil environment is air and drainage is critical. Not just having a hole at the bottom is enough however. The roots of the plant ...


6

This is the same effect we see when a clump of mint is planted in open soil - it starts to form a circle growing outwards, and as the roots get thicker in the middle of the circle the leaves get smaller but those on the outside remain big and healthy since the roots have room to expand. We can maintain larger leaves artificially by heavy feeding but even ...


5

Just to confuse the picture even more, there is a chocolate mint which has purplish stolons. There are, in fact, hundreds of varieties of mint, some of which are commercially grown for oil extraction or for leaf drying, and a lot of which haven't even been given names, being known as Mint 341, etc. There is a big difference in taste between spearmint and ...


5

I bought some Neem Oil to control spider mites, a task for which it has been largely ineffective. However, on trying it on the mint, the mint rust went away almost immediately ... within 4 days the mint pot was sending out new shoots and leaves and looking healthier than it had all year. Plus Neem Oil is non-toxic. I apply Neem Oil using a hand-sprayer, ...


5

Mint or Mentha are from the family Lamiaceae, which are really hard to distinguish, There are all kinds of hybrids and weather and soil can affect the shape to an extent to be mistaken. And if you could wait for the flowers it would be easier to tell them apart. But if you ask me I'll say A - Pepper Mint B - Spear Mint C - Candy Mint(Chocolate Mint) D -...


5

Few things to mention: first, mint prefers to be outdoors, but can be grown inside, second, the link you provided to show which mint you chose only leads to what looks like an internet service for a supermarket, not showing mint at all. From that, I'm deducing you may have bought a pot of mint from the supermarket, because most of them sell mint in the herb ...


5

Some ant here and there might eat a dead aphid or two, but they seem to actually have a symbiotic relationship, more or less, with the ants using the aphids for sugar, which they actually make, believe it or not, and then in turn protecting the aphids. So, no, neither is helping you. Washing the plant off with a very diluted soap and water solution will ...


5

Stormy has a nice answer, but I should add a WARNING: mint can be invasive on your garden, so don't plant in the middle of your garden and keep in mind: How do I eradicate Mint .


5

Plants often grow tall, spindly and "leggy" because of not enough light. The poor things are trying to climb up closer to the sun. In order to grow into the form we usually see, a mint may just need to be outdoors in the bright sunlight. If you do have a brighter indoor spot, try moving it over there and see if it helps "fill it out". Otherwise, it seems ...


5

I agree, a flower pot won't work. I have seen it contained successfully in a garden, in the ground, and how the owner did it was to use a galvanized metal dustbin or trashcan, originally intended to contain ashes from fires, about 3 feet feep and 18 inches across. He cut a foot off the bottom, dug a huge hole and inserted the the whole thing, leaving a rim ...


5

All the above are possible and difficult to diagnose. However, you need to consider the plant: Mint is a Mediterranean plant and needs very little organic matter, poor soil and very little water. It creeps around in open soil to find these things to survive. There could be too much of all the above but I would say over watering is the case here. If the ...


5

The mints are somewhat variable, and the many species and hybrids tend to cross a lot, but pennyroyal has a couple of characteristics that might be helpful: the leaf is generally small, much smaller than the leaf in your last image, and the flowers tend to be widely spread out along the stem. Based on the leaf size alone it is likely not pennyroyal, and you ...


4

I think you'll be fine as long as you transplant the resulting plants into clumps of say, three to five seedlings per pot. By tranplanting seedlings as clumps instead of individuals you will keep root disruption to a minimum. The multi-seedling transplant technique works fine for plants that normally grow in clumps - as many herbs do. (This, btw, is how ...


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