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17

Mint does not care for being mowed. If you just assert your ownership of that bit of the lawn, and mow and weed whack as you prefer, eventually it will be less minty. Oregano, in contrast, seems to decide to become a creeping ground cover in the face of endless mowing, which isn't entirely a bad thing. We have fragrant walking paths. Sure, while there are ...


13

TL;DR: They're seeds that will grow up to be a peppermint, not seeds that were made by a peppermint. Yes, peppermint is a hybrid (specifically an F1 hybrid) of two other species of mint, spearmint and watermint. Hybrids between species are generally sterile, but since the parent species are fertile, one can pollinate the other to make the peppermint seeds ...


13

Looks pretty healthy to me. A lot of plants in the mint family get purple stems as they mature. It's not unusual to have a mix of dying, seeding, and new growth intermingled in common mint. Even when the whole of the plant seems to have died back, you can still have new runners appear from underground later. Common mint thrives along riverbanks or under ...


10

Oh boy! I made the same mistake and now mine occupies about 3-4 times the area in the pic on the right here (that was taken last Oct). It's hard to tell if you're really done pulling it out, because the stolons could have propagated quite far. I don't know of an easy way (I doubt there's one...). The approach I'm taking now is to mercilessly cull most of ...


9

Well, seems you'll have a lot of thinning and pricking out to do if they all germinate. If you imagine each seed as a single mint plant, which needs 18-24 inches of space around it as it grows on, if all 50 of your seeds germinate, you will need to transplant each one into individual pots, so in theory, that's 50 pots. If you sow too thickly, or too many in ...


9

Seems like your culprit is smallish. Candidates would be caterpillars Check for their droppings - greenish or blackish "pearls" - or the animals themselves hiding either under the leaves or along the stems. Simply pick them off, no chemicals needed. slugs or snails tend to leave slimy traces - search and remove like caterpillars. bugs rather unlikely, but a ...


8

From the question, it sounds like your mint plant is too dry. Mint plants in pots are very sensitive to the moisture content of the growing media. They prefer very moist, but not saturated soil while growing. Also, mint plants like lots of light. In low light conditions they will stretch and become weak, which would cause the falling over. Also, the lower ...


8

I am growing one variety of mint in my garden and I always harvest it much in the same way that Ed Staub suggested. Namely, I take the younger leaves, not the older ones. I don't just harvest the leaves, but I break the stem somewhere in the middle. Over time, new "shoots" are formed from this stem. I sometimes even use scissors and cut down several stems, ...


8

Mint leaves are just fine to use any time, including after the plant has flowered. The flavor may not be quite as strong as it was before it flowered, so you may need to add more leaves to your jelly infusion to get the same taste. Be sure to cut the flowering stems back when you harvest. Cutting the flowering stems back may even encourage your mint to ...


8

Yes, transition shock to a degree, it should have been hardened off before being left out all the time, not only to acclimatize to colder, variable temperatures after being indoors for some time, but also to get used to direct sunlight on its leaves. It is not, however, dead - turn it out of its pot, split or select live parts from what's there, removing ...


7

Mint is generally a herbaceous perennial, so it loses its leaves and dies back every winter, then new shoots sprout from the roots in spring. With mine, I cut the dead stems back to just above soil level as part of my normal garden clean-up going into winter, and that's what I recommend you do. Don't dig up the dead stalks because mint spreads by sending ...


7

Cut a little stem and pinch off the bottom set of leaves. Then place in a clear glass. Roots should start to form in about 4 days.


7

The spinach seedlings are far more fragile; I'd recommend moving the mint. You can do it anytime, but the sooner the better. As you have just planted the mint, it should come out fairly easily. Be as careful as possible, and don't disturb the spinach seedlings. Repot the mint normally in a new container, and refill the hole in the mix for the spinach. I'd ...


6

In addition to the above helpful hints: You can help spread your plant by cutting about four or three inches off the top of a few stalks, harvest the leaves you need and re-plant the stem in the soil an inch deep. I have done this with store-bought mint leaves on stalks and they have propagated very well. Very happy with my pot of mint.


6

Like your coriander, you may be overwatering your mint as well. Although mint likes moist soil, the key here is "moist" and not "wet." Unless you are experiencing very high temps and very low humidity there, then every day is probably too often to be watering your plants.


6

It sounds like you've got veggies growing in the plot right now? I think then for this season, hand-pulling the mint is your best option. Once the veggies are out, I'd cover the area in sheets of plastic (either black or clear) And secure the edges so it is flat against the ground. It will take several months to kill the mint, but eventually it will be ...


6

When taking cuttings from a plant, I try not to take more than 1/3 of the current healthy growth. For some plants, you shouldn't take even that much. As has been mentioned, mint is very prolific and a fast grower, so you should be just fine taking around 1/3 of the currently growing, healthy young branches each time you cut. Also, mint can be propagated ...


6

Mint leaves can be used at any time when green, but they have a stronger flavor before flowering. This is true of many related plants. I usually let my mint flower, to attract bees and butterflies, and remove the flowerheads before they set seed, but you can cut the flowers at any time. If your plants seem to be developing seeds, cutting the plants back ...


6

Mint does this when constrained within a pot - its natural growth habit is to throw out long runners up to 18 inches under the ground and pop up a good distance away from the original clump, which is why its so often said its not a good idea to plant it in open ground. Turn it out of its pot, cut the root ball into 3 sections, replant one in the same pot. ...


6

I remember your first question about this plant, and have just checked the image you provided then, where it looks much healthier than it does now. I note also you posted a comment under that question to me, but didn't ping me so I didn't know it was there, so didn't respond. As you know, I don't think this is regular mint, I think its Mentha pulegium, and ...


6

Pull or cut off all the dead material, soak the pot so it's wet through, let it drain down, wait a week or two, see if it grows. If it does, you would probably need to turn it out of its pot, cut it in half and repot one of the halves, but you need to establish whether it's live or not first. UPDATE Looking at your new close up photo, it looks like there ...


6

To answer your title question, true leaves usually appear in 2-3 weeks. Those seedlings look like they need more direct sunlight. From your photo the seedlings, especially those in the red container are quite leggy, some even falling over. Tall, thin stems are a sign the seedlings are stretching to find more sun. You mentioned in a previous comment ...


5

Just to confuse the picture even more, there is a chocolate mint which has purplish stolons. There are, in fact, hundreds of varieties of mint, some of which are commercially grown for oil extraction or for leaf drying, and a lot of which haven't even been given names, being known as Mint 341, etc. There is a big difference in taste between spearmint and ...


5

i actually have this same plant. the kentucky mint. I would definitely replant it if i were you because this plant produces more roots than stems and will create about 30 to 40 more plants at the beginning of next year if you grow it to its full potential. I know I'm kinda late but give the plant more sunlight and more time for the leaves to grow.


5

Like many of the others, I just harvest the youngest leaves of my mint plants. If I am chopping them up to cook, I find it easies to just pinch off the little cluster of 4 leaves at the top of each stem. They are tender and mild, and easy to chop up. As an added benefit, harvesting this way causes the plant to grow bushier, so it looks nicer in the pot. If ...


5

I'm afraid it won't do well in a trough or window box however you water it. Mint likes a deep root run, so does much better in deep pots than it will in shallow containers, but even then, it inevitably stops growing well after a couple of years. Try getting a pot 18 inches deep and as wide as possible - that way, the mint will be more productive for longer.


5

I bought some Neem Oil to control spider mites, a task for which it has been largely ineffective. However, on trying it on the mint, the mint rust went away almost immediately ... within 4 days the mint pot was sending out new shoots and leaves and looking healthier than it had all year. Plus Neem Oil is non-toxic. I apply Neem Oil using a hand-sprayer, ...


5

Is your plant being kept indoors? Mint likes plenty of sunshine and humidity. The indoors may not provide enough of either.


5

Mint or Mentha are from the family Lamiaceae, which are really hard to distinguish, There are all kinds of hybrids and weather and soil can affect the shape to an extent to be mistaken. And if you could wait for the flowers it would be easier to tell them apart. But if you ask me I'll say A - Pepper Mint B - Spear Mint C - Candy Mint(Chocolate Mint) D -...


5

Few things to mention: first, mint prefers to be outdoors, but can be grown inside, second, the link you provided to show which mint you chose only leads to what looks like an internet service for a supermarket, not showing mint at all. From that, I'm deducing you may have bought a pot of mint from the supermarket, because most of them sell mint in the herb ...


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