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10

You might have a case of ants farming the aphids. If this is the case, tackling the aphids will not likely be productive as the ants will just replace the aphids. I suspect you will need to attack the ant nest directly. The suggestion I thought would work best from the above link was pouring boiling chili water down the nest.


8

A teaspoon of dish soap mixed with a quart of water and sprayed on will knock down the population of aphids and kill some ants. Leave it on a minute or two and give the plant a good wash down afterwards with water. (This is in case it is a plant with delicate leaves like lettuce or the mixture has too much soap and the fatty acids burn the leaves.)


7

There appears to be a long standing insect infestation, possiby whitefly (does anything rise up and fly about when you go near or disturb the plant?) or scale infestation of some sort. The leaves look somewhat sticky, they're unhealthy with evidence of damage on the stems as well - there are white dots on the upper surface of the leaves and I think there ...


6

They are aphids which are easily controlled with soap and water. Three applications of soap and water at five to seven day intervals should do the job. They are quite variable in colour. I have seen green, black and orange ones. Adults can have wings and this is how they spread to other plants. Ants also farm them so controlling them may help as well. ...


6

Whirligig mites will eat whatever is small enough for them to catch and pierce with their mouthparts, when they suck out the contents of the body of whatever it is they've caught, usually aphids and so on. They are a reasonably useful predator for small insects and shouldn't be discouraged or killed, but I wouldn't worry about moving them where you want them ...


6

Your close up leaf images show an aphid infestation. In my experience, this is a highly persistent insect that infests chili plants amongst others with over 500 different types of Aphids specific to particular plants. My own chilli plant is over one year old and got infested while outside, and again when wintered inside. I've been spraying regularly with ...


5

Those are milkweed aphids, Aphis nerii. As kevinsky notes, these can be controlled with soap and water. Below I magnified your image to better view detail, and took a comparison photo from online: Your aphids: Someone else's aphids:


5

Use neem oil or soapy water/insecticidal soap for the aphids. Most species of ants are slightly beneficial, except when they are running a protection racket on some aphids.


5

That is leafminer damage. You can control leafminers by cutting off affected leaves, to improve appearance, and remove existing leafminers before they mature (for minor infestations) Spraying with neem oil for the adult insects early in the season before they lay their eggs (this is what I usually do), or using a stronger insecticide to knock out existing ...


5

Giles. Not really...there is no black and white but better a light gray. Sooner one treats aphids the better. Hard spray of water, NEEM sprayed at night as soon as you see crowds of aphids on your roses or vegetables. But if you are on your way to a well-deserved vacation and as you go out the door and catch sight of aphids, keep going to your vacation. ...


5

I've never seen such a thing and it isn't clear to me what it is. However, it certainly is a bug if it moves. Sucking insects like aphids and scale would be on the leaves or petioles where they can tap into the little tubes (phloem) that transport the sugars from photosynthesis away from the leaves. This thing is on a woody stem and probably not a sucking ...


5

Some ant here and there might eat a dead aphid or two, but they seem to actually have a symbiotic relationship, more or less, with the ants using the aphids for sugar, which they actually make, believe it or not, and then in turn protecting the aphids. So, no, neither is helping you. Washing the plant off with a very diluted soap and water solution will ...


5

Ladybugs like to eat two things - some insects and pollen, so if you can plant around and about with plants that they'll like, that should help to not only attract them, but keep them around, so long as you've got something in flower for them. Not sure what the temperatures are like where you are, but in the UK, finding things ladybugs like that are in ...


5

I will recommend some organic methods since I am not too familiar with chemicals you can spray on the apple tree. Depending on the amount of tree that is infected, you can try one ore more of the following: Spray the affected areas with high pressure water. That may get them away from the apple plant and go elsewhere. Get some lady bugs and they are ...


5

I'm not 100% sure because the black parts are blurry, but your "mold" looks suspiciously like aphids. I think I can see at least one specimen that's clear enough to see the legs (in the 2nd picture). And that's a frequent kind of unwelcome visitor on spinach. Please look closely and check whether the black spots are in fact small insects. A magnifying lens ...


5

The Planet Natural's website has good information about the problem. here is some information they have on the subject. The common ladybug or lady beetle — every school kid’s favorite insect — is a great, natural solution to aphids. It’s reported that a ladybug will eat some 50 aphids a day. If you’re lucky enough to have ladybugs in your garden, ...


5

Aphids are always with us - they're flying insects and can affect indoor plants (especially in summer) as well as outdoor ones. Using a soapy water spray may well kill any which are currently present, but will not prevent more arriving. As this is not a food plant (meaning you're not going to be eating any part of it) you can use a systemic insecticide. ...


4

First and foremost, do confirm they are aphids. Pictures would help us confirm. Once you have been attacked by aphids, you are probably going to see them again. The real long term solution is to employ lady bugs. These guys will take care of the aphid problem quite well for you. Stormy is right. Hot water is not a good idea, unless you are talking about ...


4

Unfortunately the products that can control aphids are either not organic or they are organic, but also toxic to fish (ex. pyrethrins). It seems like you've got three options: Manual control - you systematically poke through each plant and smash the aphids OR you can use a strong jet of water to dislodge them (at which point they become Barramundi food?). ...


4

My method: take all peppers and flowers. Then put in the soil some "Actara". This should be enough to save the plant, and not to poison yourself. Usually I take some pepper and I plant it again: they grow quickly, but your pepper plant is an hybrid, so not sure if seeds can generate plants, and the seedling will not be like the original plant.


4

You can put them straight on the compost heap - aphids suck sap from the plants,and once the plants start to die back and stop growing, they'll just leave anyway, they won't live on the compost heap.


4

When I have an aphid infestation outpacing my ladybugs, I use my homemade pesticide spray of Dawn, water, and baking soda. (1 gallon water, 2 teaspoons Dawn, 4 teaspoons baking soda) Good for insects and fungus. Coat liberally. When aphids first moved in on my gardens, I bought a few thousand ladybugs. (Despite my region being thick with Asian Lady Beetles,...


4

It shouldn't be an issue to add aphid-infested plant matter to your compost. If your heap gets up to the right temperature, they'll burn to death anyways. If they lay eggs, those eggs will probably be eaten by the composting bacteria as well. I've added aphid-infested stalks in without any problems with the resulting compost.


4

Don't want to disuade you from trying but when a problematic bug explodes in number, they will never be quickly eradicated with a predator bug. Better to attend to conditions that caused the aphid outbreak. Without plentiful other sources of food for ladybugs and other conditions, they don't hang around. In any case, they will not effectively clean up aphids ...


4

Totally aphids, probably being cultivated, feed and protected by ants. I think that is so amazing. Anyhoo, the Neem should work and please spray at night. Not during the day, no matter what the label on your Neem purports. Hate to kill ants as well, but bees are our lifeline in this world! This is very temporary and not very detrimental to your plants. ...


4

You've got a scale insect infestation rather than aphids; this question and its answer is relevant Indoor plant is looking sickly although it's in regard to a different plant. It would be good to identify the plant you actually have - can you add a photo of the whole plant, including the pot as well please? It might then be possible to give a more informed ...


3

You've said you used Provado Ultimate Bugkiller and Doff All in one, three weeks in a row. Provado Ultimate Bugkiller should only be repeated every 10 days, and is both systemic and contact in action. Because its a systemic, that's why it shouldn't be used more often. Doff All in One bugkiller is a contact killer only - I've been unable to access the ...


3

Usually around this time of the year, many gardening/nursery stores carry and sell beneficial insects, such as ladybugs and praying mantises. You can even order them online. Adult ladybugs can eat up to a 1000 aphids a day and as a larvae, about half as many. Release some of them around the base of the tree after the sun goes down, so they stay put, ...


3

Hmm, that's impossible I'm afraid. Anything 'organic' isn't usually systemic, and you'd need a systemic pesticide for any lasting effect, and even then, depending on the product used, the average length of time for the product to still be having an effect will be around a fortnight. As for which product to choose, rather depends on a few things, that is, ...


3

These look like some kind of aphids to me. It wouldn't hurt to check other nearby plants for these, especially if there are also ants (sometimes ants protect and 'farm' them).


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