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16

Perhaps the first question to ask is "Is this property suitable for frogs?" and following on from that "If it is, why are there not frogs here already?" I have many, many frogs on my property since I am close to a wetland, so their noise in Spring is quite loud. There are also many snakes here which like to have frogs for lunch, but there ...


15

Looks like a red pumpkin beetle Aulacophora foveicollis


14

I agree with the other answers, you probably have an aphid infestation. But rather than spraying your trees to get rid of the aphids, you may try putting a ring of glue on your tree, to get rid of the ants. Without their support, your aphid infestation will probably quickly rescind due to the natural predators.


13

The trees have probably got aphids. From the RHS website here: Ants may be found climbing plants with aphid colonies, they tend the aphids obtaining honeydew as a reward. The ants will remove aphid predators. Not much you can do about it. If you spray the aphids, you risk killing useful predators such as ladybirds. Best treat it as all part of nature's ...


11

That is a ladybug larvae - don't kill it. It is eating pests, and is a beneficial insect. Are the beetles they were found with ladybugs? that would make sense. But Mexican bean beetles and Cucumber beetles also look like ladybugs, I'll include a side by side comparison picture. From left to right, ladybug, mexican bean beetle, and cucumber beetle: From ...


11

As far as I can tell, there is very little empirical data on garlic and mosquitoes. And all of the studies I have seen show mixed results for ingesting garlic or using garlic as a mosquito repellent. That leaves you with anecdotal evidence, so here's mine. My garlic patch used to be 30 some feet from my deck. A few years ago, I moved it so it is now just ...


10

I can't be certain with the picture quality but based on their location in the wood chips and their appearance I'm going to say you have termites. Certainly get rid of them and/or call a bug inspector to verify.


9

Grubs like the one you've pictured feed on plant roots. If there are a lot of them, then yes, they are doing damage. You may just not be noticing it yet. The worst part is they will eventually pupate into adult beetles, and those will work on damaging the above-ground parts of your plants. If they are Japanese Beetles (hard to say without more info but the ...


9

Mantids are not spectacular for pest control because they're very indiscriminate in choosing their prey. They readily attack other beneficial insects as well as harmful or pest insects. I always get a few each year, usually around something that is blooming. In my area, they like to sit and wait for pollinators. They like to attack larger prey and tend to ...


9

I think this is a Green vegatable bug (Nezara viridula, a.k.a. southern green stink bug) in one of its juvenile forms (nymph I believe). Here are a couple of examples: There are a number of stages of growth so the adult beetle looks quite different from this one. This beetle is a recognized pest of citrus plants and legumes (among others) and will often ...


9

These are Froghopper larvaes. Also, known as Splittlebugs. Wikipedia also shows the adult which I, of course, have seen in my garden. Best thing about it: They are harmless in small quantities. No need to treat. Update: Look who turned up this evening: a parent (Cercopis vulnerata)


9

Seems like your culprit is smallish. Candidates would be caterpillars Check for their droppings - greenish or blackish "pearls" - or the animals themselves hiding either under the leaves or along the stems. Simply pick them off, no chemicals needed. slugs or snails tend to leave slimy traces - search and remove like caterpillars. bugs rather unlikely, but a ...


9

The wood at the bottom of the bed looks pretty dark in comparison to the rest of the side. It's most likely that the woodlice are feeding off a decaying box, rather than anything in the bed. They'll only be recycling nutrients from the wood into the bed. They'll cause very little damage if any, mainly to soft fruit or seedling. If anything, they're highly ...


9

Looks like a heavy whitefly aphid infestation - they're usually underneath the leaves and suck the sap within, causing the leaf to shrivel and die. You can't treat with pesticide because it's an edible plant, so your only recourse is something like neem or insecticidal soap spray, I'm afraid. Further information on how to deal with whitefly on edible plants ...


9

The problem with not treating for aphids is it's likely to get worse, especially with ants warding off aphid predators. With large trees, it's obviously next to impossible to treat for aphids because you can't reach the top easily, but for your smaller tree, if there are a lot of aphids,I would recommend some treatment, even if that's just you physically ...


8

You can't avoid bugs in compost. They're an important part of the process but there are a few things you can do. If you do passive, cold composting, where you just throw in material and let things decay on their own over the course of months then you'll have an environment that is better for bugs. You can still do some things to deter nuisance bugs such as ...


8

Look on the bottom of the leaves. If you see small rows of tiny white capsules, you have leaf miners. These devastated spinach and chard for our garden. They also infest beet greens but are not a problem unless you eat the tops. Control is to remove infested plants, put screens over the plants to keep the flies from coming onto the plants, and eliminate ...


8

They are not baby spiders, but you are not too far off target. They are Spider Mites. Spider mites drink the sap of plants and in great enough numbers they can cause severe damage. The webbing is also from them, they produce it in an attempt to protect themselves from predators and to shield themselves from unfavorable climate conditions. Spider mites are ...


8

It's certainly possible to spread some fungal infections on gardening gloves and tools you may have used. Given you're wearing rubber gloves, after handling diseased plant material, its sensible to go indoors and wash your gloved hands, in a similar manner to that you would use if you weren't wearing gloves, in between healthy and non healthy plants; the ...


8

It's the surface tension in your current setup that keeps the fruit flies safe. Even if they decide to party on the vinegar, they can simply fly away again and take a nice break elsewhere. But your trap becomes a real trap if you add a tiny drop of dishwashing soap: they can no longer walk on the vinegar, but sink and drown. Using this method, you can use ...


8

We make a simple paper funnel by just rolling a sheet of paper into a cone and stapling or taping it. Then we make sure there's a small opening at the bottom. We put this into a tall glass that has a little juice or wine in it - even a little bit of chopped up fruit sometimes. This works marvelously. Also, check your drains. Fruit flies breed in a biofilm. ...


8

I'm not an entomologist but by googling, it looks to be a Rose Weevil or Fuller Rose Beetle aka Naupactus (Asynonychus) godmani. It doesn't look like it's a goodie to have on your roses The damage done by this beetle is to the foliage of the host plant by the adults and the root system is damaged by the larvae. Death of the host rose bush is a very ...


8

Be careful to only pick native species. If you want to introduce toads into your garden for pest control, I have one word of warning for you: make sure to only use a species of toad native to the area you live in. In Australia, in the 1930s, someone had a very similar idea to you, and they decided to import some South American toads, in the hopes that they ...


8

Those „eggs” are not eggs, but cabbage aphids at different stages of maturity. They feed exclusively on brassicaceae, so other non-brassica plants nearby remain safe. In dry summers they can cause severe damage and multiply very quickly. Like all aphids they suck the plants’ sap and when the infestation is severe, cause the leaves to shrivel and prevent ...


7

This is the pupa of a female Lucanus cervus. It's protected in the UK by some law.


7

That picture shows what looks remarkably like a chafer grub, commonest in lawns, but also found in borders and vegetable beds, where it particularly likes root crops. Japanese beetle grubs are similar, but have, if you look closely, a sort of hairy spine - small, fine hairs that stick up, which I cannot see in the picture, so closer examination would be good ...


7

I'm not sure what the best way to remove them is but depending on the type of wood chips they could be good to mix with other green material to turn into compost for the flower beds. Using coffee grounds, grass clippings, and other plant material should give you usable compost by next spring. There's a few videos on YouTube showing how to do this.


7

Actually, that's a Bess beetle or Patent Leather Beetle (Odontotaenius disjunctus). They eat rotting logs and are beneficial. Put it in the woods.


7

I think that might be a branch from a Juniperus species, a female, and those are the berries or 'seed pods', example here: Juniper berries (Wikimedia). Some Junipers have white berries, many have berries which start out white and change through to bluish black, so if your plant has many of these, that's all they are, and certainly nothing to worry about.


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