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11

As far as I can tell, there is very little empirical data on garlic and mosquitoes. And all of the studies I have seen show mixed results for ingesting garlic or using garlic as a mosquito repellent. That leaves you with anecdotal evidence, so here's mine. My garlic patch used to be 30 some feet from my deck. A few years ago, I moved it so it is now just ...


10

Hippotion celerio (Linnaeus, 1758) Gabi Moth, Vine Hawk Moth You must have disturbed it as it has tucked its head under its thorax and expanded its eye segments. It's agriculturally important as the adult moth contributes to the pollination of Papaya. http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/sphi/celerio.html


9

I think ladybugs are what we call ladybirds - there have always been yellow ones with black spots, sometimes black with yellow spots, and the more usual red ladybirds. They are classified often by the number of spots they have on their backs, but they all do the same job - eat aphids, which is good for your tomatoes and any other plants.


9

Mantids are not spectacular for pest control because they're very indiscriminate in choosing their prey. They readily attack other beneficial insects as well as harmful or pest insects. I always get a few each year, usually around something that is blooming. In my area, they like to sit and wait for pollinators. They like to attack larger prey and tend to ...


9

The wood at the bottom of the bed looks pretty dark in comparison to the rest of the side. It's most likely that the woodlice are feeding off a decaying box, rather than anything in the bed. They'll only be recycling nutrients from the wood into the bed. They'll cause very little damage if any, mainly to soft fruit or seedling. If anything, they're highly ...


8

I'm going to guess fungus gnats because I always think tiny black bodied winged bugs are fungus gnats but in this case I think I'm right. :) It looks like you have the plants in containers. Is that how you purchased them or did you pot them yourself? I had purchased a bag of organic potting mix once that was infested with fungus gnat eggs. Once I watered it ...


7

It's a millipede. They usually aren't a pest, unless things are very wet and/or you've got a lot of woody mulch - in which case they are one of those things that may swarm and denude your plants at night, like earwigs.


7

Those look like citrus mites to me. But it also looks like your tree may have been suffering from heat and/or moisture stress. This makes it much more susceptible to infestations of this sort, so as you treat this you need to check your cultivation practices and correct anything that is amiss. There are chemical treatments for citrus mites. You can also ...


7

Peach trees are deciduous and lose their leaves in the winter, so don't worry about that. The leaves can turn gold/brown before they drop. Some munched leaves on a healthy tree are not a problem. Hopefully you have a tree that requires very few chilling hours to produce, if it was purchased locally you should be okay. It is very young, but you should get a ...


6

Looks to be some kind of centipede, but I couldn't venture a guess at the species.


6

That is a katydid, which is any insect in the family Tettigoniidae. Yours is from the sub-family Phaneropterinae. It's a California Anglewing, Microcentrum californicum. It's probably not causing much damage on your plants, but you can control it with a general insecticide. Here's a comparison picture:


6

This bug is newly arrived in the United States, firebug. Native to Europe they eat seeds there. As they are new in North America their behaviour could change but it is likely they do not eat aphids. See the Utah State University extension fact sheet for more information. They are not hazardous to people. There have been reports of them eating other insects ...


6

I believe I found the answer after searching around a bit on this site: http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/research/biosystematics/invertebrates/invertid/list_category.asp?Ca_ID=10 I think they're called Ladybird Larvae, but please let me know if anyone thinks differently.


6

I found this document on the subject http://www.emeraldashborer.info/documents/Multistate_EAB_Insecticide_Fact_Sheet.pdf On the site http://www.emeraldashborer.info/ It seems to be a treasure trove of information about this pest. One of the key points that I noted is that the adult EAB needs to feed on foliage before becoming reproductively mature. It'...


5

Looks like a three lined potato beetle. I'm assuming control will be as for Colorado potato beetles, as described in "The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control", p260, in order of preferred controls to last resorts: shake beetles into a cup of soapy water remove beetles and larvae by hand search for & destroy eggs (bottoms of ...


5

Although I really like indoor plants, in my honest opinion, they have no way to prevent pests. Most pests are attracted by wet environments. If your soil is constantly wet, I bet there will be flies. If the soil contains organic substance, there will be other bugs too. I can't see if you have a tray under the container. If there isn't a tray to hold the ...


5

They are aphids. try neem oil. You see they are gathering around the veins of your plant's leaves. They are sucking the juice. Related questions : https://gardening.stackexchange.com/search?q=aphid


5

Looks remarkably like caterpillar damage - check the plant all over for signs of them, or leaf hoppers, and take a torch out at night and check then. Also inspect the backs of the leaves for signs of invaders resident there, though they won't be caterpillars.


5

Edit: After a tip from Bamboo and a close up picture this looks like a scale insect. Most likely this is oyster shell scale Control can be done in a number of ways which I list below: take a soft scrub brush soaked in 5 ml of soap to 1 litre of water and scrub them off the affected areas. Repeat three times at 7 to 10 day intervals. or prune the ...


5

To be frank, I'd bin them without a second's hesitation, and would have done so a while back, and that's what I recommend to you. They're serving no useful purpose other than as a source of infection to your other plants, but it may be too late, the aphid infestation may already have spread to those too - use neem spray to treat them with. Curled leaves on ...


5

It is Rosemary beetle, certainly. How much of a pest it is depends on how many there are; if there are a lot, they can reduce a lavender or rosemary plant to virtually woody stumps by eating it all, so if you were a professional grower, this pest would be taken very seriously. However, in the average garden, they may not be too much of a pest and can be ...


5

This insect looks like a blind springtail, which is an insect that feeds on fungi. Google "soil biology primer" download this great manual on soil biology. Look on page 26. Here's another description: The springtails are soft-bodied, oval or roundish shaped, primitive insects. Their bodies are made up of six or fewer segments and they lack wings. ...


4

A light vegetable oil. A miniscule amount can float on the water surface and totally gum up larval mosquito breathing. Put enough drops in to produce an oil sheen on the water surface. BTI Mosquito disks - they float on the surface, slowly dissolving and release BTI, a soil bacteria that's lethal to the mosquito intestinal tract.


4

I believe they are springtails. The definitive identification is whether they fly. If they jump around when the soil is watered: springtails. If they fly into your face or to the window: fungus gnats. If they are white and fly when disturbed they are whitefly. While the first two are annoying control can be as simple as keeping things dryer. Whitefly ...


4

Those are just leafminers. Anyway, I'm not sure about on seedlings with few leaves (that might actually be a problem), but they're generally not a big threat to plants, they say. I would recommend just taking good care of your tomatoes, and maybe using some neem oil on them or something, if you don't like the leaf miners.


4

From my research, sort of. The garlic plant itself does not keep bugs away but when you make a paste or spray garlic water onto the plants that acts a lot like the pesticide that can be used. It helps keep them away, which is nice. It can also keep away snakes from above. You can even use this to help keep moles, voles, and ground hogs from getting to the ...


4

I agree they do look like spider mites - however, you are in the UK, and red spider mite is only an issue on indoor plants here, never outdoors. I suggest you relocate your rose to the outdoors, and the spider mite should vanish on its own over a week or two, but if you happen to have any Roseclear Ultra, or another insecticidal spray, use that just in case ...


4

There is a good chance you have Codling Moth infestation. There are pesticides that can help but you can also likely fight back without chemicals by removing much of the fruit early in the year so that none of the pears are touching each other on the tree and by picking up and disposing (offsite) of any fallen fruit ASAP. Also dispose far away from your ...


4

I think the white things are insects (scales), they suck sap from the plant which is of course harmful for the plant. You see that yellow spots exists where they were sucking. You can try to wipe them away with a wet towel, and maybe use some biological pesticide. The brown leaves are not caused by these insects, but is probably a sign of too much water, or ...


4

That pest appears to be Black Cherry Aphid,and it will be very active and highly visible at this time of year. I didn't realise it could be a problem in Europe- this link has a great picture http://barmac.com.au/problem/black-cherry-aphid/ but its an Australian site, so the recommended treatment in the link probably isn't available where you are. You'll ...


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