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8

From the straggly growth pattern, tiny star-shaped white flowers and opposite, oval leaves, this is Common Chickweed (Stellaria media). Left to grow, it can eventually form a dense mat. It sprouts in fall or early winter (I've had it appear underneath a layer of snow and ice -- no chickweed before the snow, lots of it after the thaw), then flowers and sets ...


7

Nothing lasts forever.The term perennial simply means a plant that will last for more than 2 years. That can mean 3 years that can mean 50 years or more. As the plants age they can lose their ability to produce the same quantity or quality of fruit. Perennials don't live forever. They do eventually die or lose their ability to produce. For example ...


7

There are many species of Sempervivum (Hens and Chicks), and each may have a different edibility status. However, Sempervivum tectorum is edible. That appears to be the same kind you have, but I don't know. They're called Common Houseleeks for a reason. Ours appears to be S. tectorum, and I've eaten lots of it without any toxic symptoms whatsoever. I've ...


7

It's extremely helpful that you included the actual ingredient list in your question, rather than a brandname - thank you! So you know, I grow anything that I eat organically and this question is one of the reasons why I do (the other reason is that I was once a Certified Pesticide Applicator for five years, and the training you receive to get that ...


6

Yes, your peppers will be safe to eat. the only chance of contamination is if soil from your planter splashes onto the fruit, but they can be washed, and soured soil isn't much higher in human pathogens than healthy soil is. Checking for good drainage is always a key component to container gardening, (any gardening, actually, but most problems cropping up ...


6

Urine from healthy dogs (and humans) is sterile on leaving the body. It can, however, encourage the growth of existing bacteria: so these you would have been exposed to anyway. Faeces are not sterile at all and fresh faeces from pretty much any animal can be very harmful to humans. Dogs frequently carry parasites which are easily transmitted to humans and ...


6

Agua de Matali with Mint and Lime Adapted from Chef Christian Bravo, Restaurante Punta del Mar, Merida, Yucatan Matali is the Mexican name for Tradescantia zebrina (striped) or Tradescantia pallida (purple), a species of spiderwort native to the Gulf Coast of eastern Mexico. In the US, it's known as inch plant, purpleheart, and wandering jew, and it's ...


6

This one isn't deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) but woody nightshade, (Solanum dulcamara); as such, its berries are toxic and therefore inedible. It tends to appear on its own, so look out for more plants next year.


5

The removal of the membrane around papaya seeds (the sarcotesta) will slightly increase germination rate and slightly decrease germination time. Typically, sarcotestas exist so some of the many seeds in plants like papayas and pomegranates will survive the digestion process of a consuming animal. If you're planting the seeds just after removal, it's not ...


5

I would add some fertilizer. Not much, rosemary is a plant of poor and dry soils. On the other hand, if it is a lot woody, probably it has eat most of nutrient in the soil. I would also check if there are some plants nearby which compete with rosemary. Rosemary is slow to grow (I think also on the roots), and it hates shadow. Really! Pruning: I would never ...


4

In short, no, they are not dangerous to your scallions. The mushrooms appear to be one of the parasol type, likely Leucopcoprinus bimbaumii (link below). Its a saphrophytic mushroom, meaning it lives off decaying matter in the soil in the pot, and is not uncommon in containers. It is toxic if you eat it, but won't make your scallions toxic or poisonous. The ...


4

I would challenge some of your assumptions. I think some annual plants are good. You can buy some of them for few francs on every "grocery" shop e.g. basil, rosemary, or also tomatoes, etc. Then you trow away in autumn, as most of our citizen, or put the pot inside for winter (not the tomatoes). Additionally I don't recommend to plant herbs as perennials in ...


4

Isopropyl alcohol acts as a desiccant and melts the wax that is some insects bodies. It also evaporates so very little remains. It is not absorbed by the plant and washing with water after you harvest is recommended anyway.


3

There is conflicting information on the web regarding the edibility of this plant (for humans), and most of it doesn't seem to be from any major reputable scientific source. It is not listed in any of the Herbal Dictionaries I've checked, including Wiki's list. Either way, from what information is available, Tradescantia zebrina is not considered one of the ...


3

I checked out the pictures, but frankly, they're not much use - they're blurry and only show the flowering tops of the plant. What we need to see are the leaves/stems/foliage, and a clear, focused shot would be good. However, the likelihood is that the plant is Foeniculum vulgare - good photos will confirm for sure, or you can examine what you see in the ...


3

A lot of light is required for plants to produce food. You will find lights at aquarium web sites . I think it would require a few to several hundred dollars for lights for a 10 square foot shelf.


3

The plant is a fuchsia, possibly Fuchsia magellanica: http://www.perennials.com/plants/fuchsia-magellanica.html or Fuchsia triphylla: https://plantsam.com/fuchsia-triphylla/. Looks more like triphylla to me... Although considered to be edible, fuchsia fruit is not very tasty. it can apparently be made into a nice jelly, however, which kind of puts them in ...


3

This plant is, as Jurp says, a Fuchsia, but its actually Fuchsia boliviana. The fruits are edible, but as already said, are not usually very tasty so may be made into a jam or jelly, though they can be eaten raw if you want http://www.strangewonderfulthings.com/125.htm


3

Yes, it's edible regardless of its size. I'd imagine however that just like the leaves, the roots get probably more bitter as they age. With that being said, the biggest reason why its roots aren't commonly eaten lies in the fact that they're usually small and particularly hard to clean. Once you do clean them thoroughly, though, they can be eaten just like ...


2

Warning: Some of these solutions may actually be or become problems, due to the invasive nature of most of my suggestions. I'm just assuming you might prefer some of them to garlic mustard. Use my suggestions judiciously. Clover might work reasonably well. Creeping Charlie would probably work great. It is a weed and hard to get rid of, but it's perennial, ...


2

I did some research with the phrase "Cuban Cumin" you gave in your post: Have you checked Plectranthus amboinicus"Cuban Oregano" / "Spanish Thyme" / "Indian Borage"? Your plant looks quite similar to this: . As you told us very little about the characteristics of your plant, you could compare yours with the description at the link abobe.


2

Sheep sorrel. My yard is a small lot shaded by some trees and other buildings and this grows fine in mostly shady areas. But most food plants need some sun during the day. It has a tart lemony flavor and is literally a weed, so is easy to grow given reasonably good conditions. Frankly I'd get a grow light, or some other type of bright light (like for ...


2

That is going to be very difficult. A few tough herbs might work - mint and thyme come to mind. Have you thought of a small hydroponic system?


2

I went out with a friend on Friday and harvested the seed pods from that plant to make anisette. We went near the mouth of Topanga Canyon up the coast from LA. The seed heads have a licorice taste. My friend refers to the plants as fennel. I am trying to find how to differentiate fennel from anise. Apparently, they are in the same family related to ...


2

Garlic has done OK outside the fence, as have chives. Neighboring garden had apparent success with potatoes outside the fence (makes sense, the plant is poisonous.) Raspberries (and other bramble fruit) are generally OK. They have not hassled my blueberries as far as I recall, though plenty of smaller beasties go for the fruit. I've had no noticeable trouble ...


2

It's called evolution. Different plants have different strategies to help replicate their genome across the planet. Annuals, or bi-annuals have found it best to flower in the first or second year. So, you'll see cabbages etc change their shape dramatically as they become tall and flowery so that they can disperse their seeds as far as possible. Once they ...


2

I learned that this plant is edible, when traveling in Uruguay in February 2016. Upon returning home we here at Earthship Biotecture have been eating it in salads all the time, as we have it growing profusely in our greenhouses. It does not have a distinctive taste, but makes the salads look really colorful and beautiful, and I am sure it adds plenty of ...


2

This looks quite a bit like Persian Cress. (Lepidium Sativum) I have a Jhonnys seed catalog and its pretty much the only green that looks like that leaf type, pretty distinctive serrated edge and oval shape. The bright true green color is right on too. Catalog says the flavor is mild. 21 days to maturity at 2-6" long. Yum.


2

Lingonberry, blueberry, and cranberry come to mind. ;^) Checkerberry (wintergreen) too. Give them more light (cut down enough spruce/fir to make some sun on the spot) and fruiting should improve. Or move the plants to the sunny spot. Potatoes actually like a light, acid soil pretty well, though they would probably appreciate more nitrogen than there ...


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