28

Most potatoes, as far as I know, have the ability to flower and set fruit. The fruits, known as berries, are small green globes reminiscent of tomatoes, which makes sense seeing as how they're in the same family. It's very important to note that these fruits are somewhat poisonous, though! The seeds in the berries are viable and can, indeed, be planted for a ...


13

The tubers that are used for "seed potatoes" are grown and harvested exactly the same way as other potatoes, except for one thing. Like other members of the same plant family (e.g. tomatoes), potatoes are are easily infected with virus diseases. Some of these (like "potato blight") are serious and may cause the entire crop to fail. Others ...


11

Those are fine-looking mushrooms! The key for mushrooms "like from the store" (in Germany) is to harvest when they are not yet fully mature. This means that the velum, the thin skin at the underside of the cap, is still closed. A mature mushroom will have a flatter cap with exposed gills, ready to release the spores. And mushrooms mature quickly once they ...


10

All tap holes injure maple trees. Extensive research into spile-hole damage (with an eye to reducing it, and preserving productivity) is precisely what has driven the downsizing of spiles. Few producers (essentially no serious ones) use even the 7/16 size currently. The area of damaged wood (which cannot produce sap in the future, until the tree has ...


10

I would not eat them, just because there is very little left. I would have no problem eating leaves with little damage. These are just eaten (by expert), so they are good, and they don't leave traces (and poo), no more than usual insects which are not eating the leaves. In any case you will clean them with water, and then cook them. So there is really no ...


10

All of the cabbage leaves are edible, and they won't taste like bugs. Leaves with holes might not be appealing to dinner guests, but no harm or bad taste will come to you and your family eating them. Just give them a good rinse before you prepare to make sure any insects or insect remnants are washed off. I'm not sure what organism ate your plants but check ...


9

Mint leaves are just fine to use any time, including after the plant has flowered. The flavor may not be quite as strong as it was before it flowered, so you may need to add more leaves to your jelly infusion to get the same taste. Be sure to cut the flowering stems back when you harvest. Cutting the flowering stems back may even encourage your mint to ...


9

If the tomatoes have any red on them, you can set them out on the counter or a windowsill and they may still ripen. If they are all green, your best bet is to use them for fried green tomatoes or green tomato relish. Since you've already tilled the tomato plants in to your garden, you could also compost them if you aren't interested in eating them. Some ...


9

It varies by type of plant and sometimes between seed sellers. It could mean from when you sow your seeds or when you transplant. Burpee is one of the seeds merchants that is pretty clear about what they mean and in general appears to follow the following pattern: When seeds are primarily directly sown in your garden the maturity date is from the time your ...


9

It really depends on the variety. Some can stay on the vine for a long time after they're ripe (how long they can stay on is known as hang-time), and some have to be picked as soon as they're ripe. How picking affects the matter also seems dependent on the variety, as well as how ripe the fruit is when you pick it. It seems to me that if you pick them when ...


9

I have heard that letting them get too large makes them sour/bitter. According to: https://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-cucumbers/ They say, "Don’t let the cucumbers get oversized or they will be bitter, and will also keep the vine from producing more."


9

No, there isn't. Providing you check them for flavor and make sure they haven't aged too far. At about 2 inches diameter. Larger than that and you'll start noticing flavor change and flesh hardening which is the important indicator that they've gone too far. As long as the skin is soft, there is no flavor change and the flesh is fully moist, you will have a ...


9

You don't have to snap or break them - I've seen it being harvested in the fields here in the UK, and all the people doing the job have a knife. They cut right at the base of suitably sized spears, just above the fibrous root matter, using a very sharp knife so as to cause as little disturbance to the roots as possible. I'd recommend you do the same, ...


8

Maybe we should rethink the way we garden! I, too cut the main head off that was huge on my fall cauliflower. But it had been planted next to a new fruit tree and I did not want to disturb the roots so I left it there thinking that it would decompose on its own. In the spring it produced 4 side shoots - each producing a very full head. I cut those off ...


8

A couple of things to look for other than the feel (they should be firm if you can find a spot to squeeze them where they aren't too prickly). Some amount of spines are normal on all cucumbers, but this one looks especially spiny. Color: they should be medium to dark green. this depends on the cultivar though, some of them will be different colors. from the ...


8

Once they are red or ripe get them off the vine/bush! This promotes MORE fruit setting, ripening. Keep them cool and eat them sooner than later. Don't put in the refrigerator. Keep apples and bananas away from other vegetables or flowers you don't want them to ripen or die quickly.


8

Judging by the state of the plants when you dug them up, and what the soil surface looks like there are no nutrients whatever in it. The potatoes tried to grow, using the material stored in the tuber, but that's as much as they managed to do. The leaves never developed properly, nor did the roots. They would have grown just as "well" if you had just put ...


7

Spinach is a crop that likes the weather to be on the cooler side. Spring sown spinach will generally begin to go to seed when the days become long and the temperatures are consistently in the upper 80s to 90s. It may also "bolt" (go to seed) if the plant is not getting enough moisture. You will be able to tell "bolting" is occurring when the central stem ...


7

The larger leaves don't necessarily have poor flavor. It's more about age than size. Old leaves don't taste as good as new ones. That's why a good harvesting system is key. Most people try to do this by harvesting the oldest (lowest) leaves as the plant grows, before they get too old. While this can work, it's not the most awesome method for plant form and ...


7

Garlic is grown from cloves and not from seed. You plant individual cloves and these form bulbs. You then save the largest bulbs to plant the cloves the following year. This is because soft neck garlic doesn't usually produce seeds and even if they do, they are not true. That's why it's usually propagated by the planting of cloves from bulbs.


7

Sun is essential for full ripening and flavour; though they can be picked and ripened separately, they will be sweeter if left to ripen on the plant. Watering should be sufficient and frequent enough to keep the plant well supplied, but without leaving it waterlogged. You've not said whether your plant is in the ground or in a pot, but if it's in a pot, ...


7

Most continuous production systems (tomatoes & peppers in greenhouses or the tropics being the major exception that comes to mind) do find it beneficial to replace old plants with young ones on a regular basis. In zone 4 we don't really have this problem, as winter provides a defined end point (you can pick kale in the snow, but it pretty much stops ...


7

However, the summer here has been very hot This might very well be the reason. Potatoes tend to stop the production of tubers once the soil reaches a certain temperature. Gardeners that plant their potatoes in dark plastic bags and unwittingly put the bags into a sunny spot often have the same problem. Next year, plant your potatoes as early as possible to ...


7

Yes, but you must be smarter than a doctor or engineer: some of the richest are php engineers. It is mainly economy: if there are many people that could do something, they will fight to produce it for less, the price will be low. So to have high gain you need something unique or seldom. Often this could be a terroir (just a piece of land in a well named ...


7

When you say its going to freeze, do you mean you're going to have a frost? I don't know what Zone you're in, but it seems unlikely you'll be going straight from cool to the ground freezing solid in a day. Physalis pruinosa is a frost sensitive plant, obviously, but if there's going to be frost tonight,do not pick your ground cherries - cover them with a ...


7

The simple answer is yes, all maples can be tapped for syrup. Some, such as Acer palmatum are a waste of time to try if you expect great taste and volume. This site lists the top 22 trees for the best syrup. Plenty of maples but Japanese Maple is not listed. You most certainly could try. If you follow directions you will not hurt your tree at all. ...


6

I have managed woodlands in UK for their historic and conservation values. Coppice is cut at ground level and soil often scraped against the stump to encourage development of roots from the pleachers (upright stems). Similar to layering. This means that the pleacher benefits from the original root system and also from the new root. The result is that the ...


6

My dog figured out that cauliflower is delicious. Two plants survived with just a nub of the flower intact. They have regrown and I now have two more heads! They are not as tightly packed as the first ones were. I have also cut off some of the leaves and eaten them as well. I am going to cut off the majority of the head and see if it will do it again.


6

It depends when you want them. They should last until winter in the ground without bolting. Carrots are normally biennial, and will bolt during season 2. You can harvest them at any time while growing, and can leave them until a hard freeze. They take frost, but not a hard freeze. There is another thing you can try: Put haybales end to end down both sides of ...


6

Mint leaves can be used at any time when green, but they have a stronger flavor before flowering. This is true of many related plants. I usually let my mint flower, to attract bees and butterflies, and remove the flowerheads before they set seed, but you can cut the flowers at any time. If your plants seem to be developing seeds, cutting the plants back ...


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