18

If you had more mint, I'd go with what Yoda said. But for a plant you're harvesting as hard as shown, pulling the biggest leaves will result in a lot of bare stems and a pretty lanky plant - as shown. So I'd suggest going the opposite way. Harvest from your tallest stem, starting at the top, and pruning back as you harvest. When you get down to around 2-...


16

Here's a picture of my mint plant showing a flower (left) and most of the plant (right). The way I harvest is to pick a few leaves (how much ever I need), but never all from the same stem. I pick the biggest leaves from different parts of the plant, and by the time I need more, the plant will have produced lots more. As you can see, I have way more than I ...


16

If you harvest when the flowers fall you will get a more tender potato, better for frying and boiling. If you wait until the tops are dried, you get the best storage potatoes, better for mashing and baking. Harvesting over time is easier on you and gives a steady supply. Also, there is nothing wrong with frost on the vines at maturity, because the vines ...


16

Herbs (and leaf vegetables in general) must be harvested regularly and not left to mature too much or too soon. Here are a few tips to harvesting herbs — mostly paraphrased from these two answers of mine — that'll help you keep a good availability of herbs for most of the year. Harvest the young leaves There's a reason why grocery stores only sell the ...


15

Every time I've grown potatoes, there's been a day when the plants as a whole just all collapse. Distressed, I've dug up to see what's going on, and ended up with perfectly nice potatoes. If that doesn't happen to you, then do it before a frost, because potatoes aren't one of those vegetables that is nicer for frost exposure. (Actually I grow them in a ...


11

I have had that happen to me before, and I found a very small worm, the sunflower moth larvae, resembling a miniature corn ear worm. They were boring very small holes in the shells and eating the insides out. They can be controlled the same way as corn ear worms. They can do real damage to a crop of sunflowers.


11

Those are fine-looking mushrooms! The key for mushrooms "like from the store" (in Germany) is to harvest when they are not yet fully mature. This means that the velum, the thin skin at the underside of the cap, is still closed. A mature mushroom will have a flatter cap with exposed gills, ready to release the spores. And mushrooms mature quickly once they ...


10

I watched a video on this precise question because my neighbour invited me to take rhubarb from her plant, and I wanted to make sure I did it in a way that wouldn't affect her plant. The video was made by Tom Cole at Capel Manor College in London. It has been deleted, but these are the points I took from it: Don't cut the stalk with a knife. Pull it right ...


10

Pick them as soon as they are as ripe as you want them. They won't get any bigger, and too many fruit will restrict the formation of more fruit. If you live in a dry climate, then @Brian's suggestion of hanging them up is definitely the way forward, and is very traditional in places like New Mexico. @Kate's dehydrator should work in a humid climate, but ...


10

All tap holes injure maple trees. Extensive research into spile-hole damage (with an eye to reducing it, and preserving productivity) is precisely what has driven the downsizing of spiles. Few producers (essentially no serious ones) use even the 7/16 size currently. The area of damaged wood (which cannot produce sap in the future, until the tree has ...


10

I would not eat them, just because there is very little left. I would have no problem eating leaves with little damage. These are just eaten (by expert), so they are good, and they don't leave traces (and poo), no more than usual insects which are not eating the leaves. In any case you will clean them with water, and then cook them. So there is really no ...


10

All of the cabbage leaves are edible, and they won't taste like bugs. Leaves with holes might not be appealing to dinner guests, but no harm or bad taste will come to you and your family eating them. Just give them a good rinse before you prepare to make sure any insects or insect remnants are washed off. I'm not sure what organism ate your plants but check ...


9

Having been in a commercial apple "cold store", I would think coolness was the most important. The lights were on when I was there, but I assume they went off when the door closed. Can't comment on air circulation, or what kind of humidity control existed (this was in England). However, I think windfalls are probably a major reason for your problem. ...


9

Once the vine starts to die back, that is a useful indicator that they are ready or nearly ready. Other indicators of a ripe pumpkin include: It should sound a bit hollow when you slap it The stem should be hard and start to have cracks in it Pressing the skin with a fingernail should dent but not puncture


9

If the tomatoes have any red on them, you can set them out on the counter or a windowsill and they may still ripen. If they are all green, your best bet is to use them for fried green tomatoes or green tomato relish. Since you've already tilled the tomato plants in to your garden, you could also compost them if you aren't interested in eating them. Some ...


9

It varies by type of plant and sometimes between seed sellers. It could mean from when you sow your seeds or when you transplant. Burpee is one of the seeds merchants that is pretty clear about what they mean and in general appears to follow the following pattern: When seeds are primarily directly sown in your garden the maturity date is from the time your ...


9

It really depends on the variety. Some can stay on the vine for a long time after they're ripe (how long they can stay on is known as hang-time), and some have to be picked as soon as they're ripe. How picking affects the matter also seems dependent on the variety, as well as how ripe the fruit is when you pick it. It seems to me that if you pick them when ...


9

I have heard that letting them get too large makes them sour/bitter. According to: https://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-cucumbers/ They say, "Don’t let the cucumbers get oversized or they will be bitter, and will also keep the vine from producing more."


9

No, there isn't. Providing you check them for flavor and make sure they haven't aged too far. At about 2 inches diameter. Larger than that and you'll start noticing flavor change and flesh hardening which is the important indicator that they've gone too far. As long as the skin is soft, there is no flavor change and the flesh is fully moist, you will have a ...


9

You don't have to snap or break them - I've seen it being harvested in the fields here in the UK, and all the people doing the job have a knife. They cut right at the base of suitably sized spears, just above the fibrous root matter, using a very sharp knife so as to cause as little disturbance to the roots as possible. I'd recommend you do the same, ...


8

I am growing one variety of mint in my garden and I always harvest it much in the same way that Ed Staub suggested. Namely, I take the younger leaves, not the older ones. I don't just harvest the leaves, but I break the stem somewhere in the middle. Over time, new "shoots" are formed from this stem. I sometimes even use scissors and cut down several stems, ...


8

Maybe we should rethink the way we garden! I, too cut the main head off that was huge on my fall cauliflower. But it had been planted next to a new fruit tree and I did not want to disturb the roots so I left it there thinking that it would decompose on its own. In the spring it produced 4 side shoots - each producing a very full head. I cut those off ...


8

Do you mean the flower has died back (all brown and dead looking), but when you break the head apart, there aren't any seeds? These are typically black or stripey. If they are missing, then the florets did not pollinate - I've often seen this where only a part of the flower pollinates, and perhaps the edges don't. Also, don't discount animals. Birds and ...


8

I would take basil by pinching whole stems off. The new growth is the best tasting and the plant will sprout multiple new stems from the old one. You have to be careful not to overdo it which is why you might want more than one plant to produce enough basil on a regular basis. Most herbs will respond to this treatment, I can't think of any exceptions, but I ...


8

A couple of things to look for other than the feel (they should be firm if you can find a spot to squeeze them where they aren't too prickly). Some amount of spines are normal on all cucumbers, but this one looks especially spiny. Color: they should be medium to dark green. this depends on the cultivar though, some of them will be different colors. from the ...


8

Mint leaves are just fine to use any time, including after the plant has flowered. The flavor may not be quite as strong as it was before it flowered, so you may need to add more leaves to your jelly infusion to get the same taste. Be sure to cut the flowering stems back when you harvest. Cutting the flowering stems back may even encourage your mint to ...


8

Once they are red or ripe get them off the vine/bush! This promotes MORE fruit setting, ripening. Keep them cool and eat them sooner than later. Don't put in the refrigerator. Keep apples and bananas away from other vegetables or flowers you don't want them to ripen or die quickly.


7

This hasn't been answered yet so I'm going with the most likely causes and you can derive the most likely out of those. Sorry I can't be more specific, but it would probably depend on really localised variables given your cherry tomatoes are so flavourful: Prolonged cold spells weakening plants (redirecting nutrients), especially while tomatoes ripenening. ...


7

I have had that happen when I put the basil into a sink of water to wash instead of washing the cuttings under running water. The newest growth turned black and even older growth did at the "crotches". I maintain indoor plants for a living, this is exactly the same reaction as over-watering does to a plant. My understanding in that event is that it is ...


7

According to Diane's Flower Seeds, you should wait until they fall to the ground to harvest them. Harvest ground cherries when they fall from the plants. They should be eaten when they are fully ripe and have turned from green to yellow.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible