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12

Many people plant marigolds (Calendula officinalis, not the French marigold, Tagetes) as a 'trap' crop, but the 'trap' attracts aphids, particularly blackfly. The theory is, if the blackfly inhabit the marigolds, they won't inhabit your roses or whatever it is you're trying to protect. In my experience, blackfly do love marigolds - not quite as much as they ...


11

Purple Dead Nettle (Lamium purpureum) It grows to 5–20 cm (rarely 30 cm) in height. The leaves have fine hairs, are green at the bottom and shade to purplish at the top; they are 2–4 cm long and broad, with a 1–2 cm petiole (leaf stalk), and wavy to serrated margins. Family: Mint (Lamiaceae) Habitat: roadsides, waste places, gardens Height: 4-12 inches ...


11

I recall doing something like this each spring (for several years) growing up, and the plant of choice was Marigolds (planted in a paper cup, as far as I recall) which were grown in class and then taken home at the end. Tough enough, and if grown in the classroom they can also be an educational experience while not taking up any of your growing space at ...


10

It looks like Cleome hassleriana, commonly known as spider flower. Identifying characteristics are the compound leaves with seven leaflets, the long petioles (leaf stalks), the way that the individual flowers are held tightly furled around the flower head, and the long stamens visible on the older flowers lower down on the head. It's an annual, and spreads ...


9

I haven't done specific research, but am happy to provide you with my personal experience. Every year I grow many varieties of marigolds and they're always among the least bothered in my garden. Animals who eat annuals and perennials planted alongside my marigolds almost always completely ignore them. Those include chipmunks, rabbits, squirrels, and larger ...


9

My two suggestions; Scarlet Runner Beans and the second is Carex testacea or Orange Sedge. Easy to grow, very pretty no matter its age, wonderful to tuck into any plant bed or pot, nice just left in the pot and moved around to dress up a corner or a group of pots. My second suggestion would be Scarlet Runner Beans. Tough, hardy, vigorous, fast...very ...


8

Marigolds will keep some animals away - works best on insects. Some people say marigolds will keep cats out of a bed, but I have had some feral cats that hadn't read this and they went in the beds and did their thing where the marigolds were. Marigolds will keep nematodes away from the members of the Solanacea family - tomatoes, peppers, petunias, tobacco, ...


8

That's a Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus), identified by its almost round leaves with the stems joining the leaves slightly off center, and the pronounced radial veins. Some cultivars are trailing and work well in hanging baskets, some are bushier and are useful in garden beds. The seed is a light grey color, spherical and wrinkled; i could see how it might ...


8

Have you considered something as simple as Garden Cress (Lepidium sativum)? You can simply hand out a pack of seeds and a piece of cotton wool. The kids can then "plant" it themselves (really just sprinkle the seeds on damp cotton wool) and watch it grow. Given how fast it grows - couple of inches a week - and that it is edible, its a pretty good learning ...


7

As far as I'm aware, Dahlias are perennials in USDA Hardiness Zone 7 and higher. In zone 6 and below they are treated as an annual. Instead of collecting seeds (which can be done, see below), it's generally recommended to dig up the tubers (roots) in the Autumn (Fall), clean them, store them, then replant them in the Spring a week or two before the average ...


7

Annual means that the plant has a full life cycle (seed-to-seed cycle) in at most one year. It will germinate, bloom and die that year. This is not a calendar year per se. Some species germinate in autumn, survive through the winter and bloom next spring. A good example is the French Marigold. A biennial plant takes two years to complete it's life cycle. ...


7

Well, yes and no, or maybe. Annual plants have one purpose - to grow, flower, be pollinated and fertilized, set seed and die, all in a year. Then there's biennials - these form, usually, a basal clump of leaves one year, then flower the following year, set seed and die. Other plants that are considered 'annuals' may actually be perennial, but either look ...


7

Some things are annuals in some places (usually colder) and perennials in other places. And some people say things that are not strictly true. Tomatoes are perennials - in the tropics, or in a heated greenhouse. But we treat them as annuals in the colder regions, normally. I find "French sorrel" to be an unreliable perennial in my garden - I will get a few ...


6

Oh cute...Marigold plants are said to help keep predators/insects away but I've never seen anything that would verify this...grow marigolds for their beauty...they are STINKY so maybe that helps. Grins, I've never seen that marigolds helps with; cutworms, aphids, slugs, earwigs, powdery mildew, or any regular problem for other ornamentals. Vigilance, going ...


6

Well we're already into July, past the longest day, so it rather depends where you live - if you're somewhere that experiences fall by September, no, don't nip those off. If, on the other hand, you have warm temperatures right up to Christmas, then yes, you could do - but shortening day length also has an impact on plants in terms of growth and flowering. On ...


6

Usually when I see button chrysanthemums (the most common kind) and Michaelmas daisies (Asters) labelled as annuals, which they are not, it's because they've been treated with carvacrol (C6H3CH3(OH)(C3H7)) or phosphon-D (tributyl-2, 4-dichlorobenzylphosphonium chloride), or a similar dwarfing agent. Of course, this treatment doesn't last forever, so when ...


6

Edit: I retract my opinion on the ID. I think it is Persicaria orientalis as stated in the newer answers. Good catch Actually, it's not a tree at all, but an herbaceous annual, called Love Lies Bleeding. It's Amaranthus caudatus. It is a common ornamental plant that lasts only a year, but will frequently reseed itself, and return year after year that way. ...


6

That is an unripe seed pod of Nigella damascena, also known as love-in-a-mist. It is a common garden annual, partly so because it is attractive through various stages, from bloom to seeding. Also, it has a tendency to self-seed, making it a relatively hassle-free ornamental. Seed pods are also dried for dried flower arrangements. The most common colour for ...


5

Not sure whether you're after a solution for this year only or for years to come. Though if you're about to have your first (?) child (congrats) your garden is going to be neglected for more than a year or two (in my experience). The overall all-time lowest maintenance item I have in my veg garden is rhubarb which simply comes back year after year and needs ...


5

Marigolds are about the easiest thing I know of to save seed from. When the flowers die, let them stay (don't deadhead), then when they are thoroughly dry just pull the centers from the dried up flowerhead. The seeds are about ½" long. The only complication I can think of in your situation is that you only have a single plant. It might be self-fertile, but ...


5

Because perennials generally last the longest, people often choose them first when designing their garden. Among other things, this broad category includes popular bulbs like tulips and daffodils, and flowers with many varieties, like lillies. Learn2Grow offers detailed information about annuals, biennials and perennials, as well as links to other sites. ...


5

Without disrepsect for your answer, @J. Musser, This plant is actually Persicaria orientalis, formerly Polygonum orientale as noted by @Mayra, commonly known as "Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate". Wikipedia article: Persicaria is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants in the knotweed family, Polygonaceae. Plants of the genus are known commonly as knotweeds ...


5

This plant is "Polygonum orientale".


5

It is a succulent and won't take much foot traffic at all, compared with grass. If you plan to walk through your yard often, I wouldn't recommend you do this. Also, it will shade and cool the soil, and so will encourage the germination and establishment of weeds where they otherwise would be getting baked. Other than that, it could look good while green. I'...


5

That appears to be a sunflower seedling (Helianthus annuus). it could have come from bird seed, or droppings. They can get quite large, and if you can put them in the ground that's ideal (if you want to keep them). They love nitrogen, and well drained neutral soil. Either way (pot or ground), they will probably flower and you can save the seeds.


5

I don't know what you mean by 'frosty' leaves, but the plant looks like a Petunia, specifically, a double flowered variety similar to the one pictured here https://www.bakker.com/en-gb/p/petunia-double-pirouette-pink-white-M58773. It'll only be that if you live somewhere warm and temperatures are over (roughly) 18deg C currently-these plants are grown as ...


4

It looks like 'bur ragweed', Ambrosia confertiflora to me. However, you need the inflorescence (or sometimes the fruit) to ID the Ambrosia genera. It does not really matter as you deal with most of the genera the same way. These are considered weeds in Israel. http://www.sviva.gov.il/InfoServices/ReservoirInfo/DocLib2/Publications/P0701-P0800/P0707.pdf


4

As far as the plants are concerned, it's still dark at night, unless you spent the price of a house on some very abnormally large and bright solar lights.


4

Depending on where you are located, your first frost will be anytime from now till mid-November. In any case, This is an annual morning glory, so it will do it's best to flower and go to seed before frost kills it. These plants sense seasonal changes by day-length, temperature changes, and a couple other things. These things tell the plant Fall is coming, ...


4

You can plant lettuce and other small-seeded plants without needing to thin. One trick that can help you avoid thinning is to make your own seed "tape". You can make these indoors so you don't have to bend down in the garden while trying to carefully drop tiny seeds at appropriate intervals. Get some cheap paper napkins from a fast-food joint (really cheap: ...


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