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11

It is a passion flower, but it's not Passiflora incarnata; your photo shows Passiflora caerulea. The rays on the first variety are wavy or crimped, whereas the second has generally straight but slightly curved rays, like those in your photo. P. caerulea is not quite so hardy as P. incarnata and may be killed back to the ground in a hard winter (temps below -...


10

This is definitely (I should never say definitely) but when I first saw your pictures I thought squash. This looks like WATERMELON! How long ago did you take these pictures? Any signs of little gourds? A member of the Cucurbitaceae family. watermelon plants


9

That is Passiflora suberosa, or corky stem passionflower. The fruits are edible when ripe. They can contain small amounts of cyanide when green. Note that this is an invasive weed in some areas. References: 1. (cabi.org) http://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/38805 2. (toptropicals.com) http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/Passiflora_suberosa.htm 3. (...


8

Vines are not a special group of plants, but - like trees and shrubs - defined by appearances. Vines have long stalks/shots/branches that are too weak to support themselves. Usually vines are divided in two subgroups, creepers and climbers: Creepers are vines that - if left alone - trail over the ground or hang down. If gardeners want them to grow upwards, ...


8

That looks like a clitoria ternata. The wiki page says: Clitoria ternatea, common names including butterfly pea, blue pea, Cordofan pea and Asian pigeonwings, is a plant species belonging to the Fabaceae family. The flowers of this vine have the shape of human female genitals, hence the Latin name of the genus "Clitoria", from "clitoris".


8

English Ivy (hedera helix) climbs by thin roots penetrating whatever it clings to. So if you want to use rope, it would be better to use natural fibre rather than nylon which may be too smooth for it to get any grip. It won't climb by wrapping its stems around the rope or net like bindweed, honeysuckle, etc. Another issue is that ropes will presumably move ...


7

I have it growing in my garden in the southern most part of Virginia. I can attest that it is extremely invasive. On the other hand, it makes a beautiful display with the white flowers in May. After that, I'm in a never ending battle of keeping it at bay. It is even growing up through the deck. It grows solid green in my garden with full morning sun (east ...


7

Standard, in this context, means trained into tree form. Usually standard shrubs and vines are trained from a young age, allowing only one stem to grow from the ground, forming the trunk. This must be kept free of sideshoots and laterals up to a certain point, which makes up the head of the standard. A good head will look bushy and balanced, and fit with the ...


7

It looks like Dutchman's Pipe, AKA Pipevine, or Aristolochia macrophylla. See the picture at this site. I could be wrong, especially as I don't know that this comes with white flowers in any variety (I could be wrong), but it looks the same. It's vigorous and can handle that zone and colder (to hardiness zone 4).


7

Virginia creeper. I have this in my backyard. And I had to learn the difference between this and poison ivy as young VC vines have only 3 leaves at the growing end.


7

This is Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) - Wikipedia. "Momordica charantia, known as bitter melon, bitter gourd, bitter squash, or balsam-pear, has names in other languages which have entered English as loanwords, e.g. goya from Okinawan, pākal (பாகல்) in Tamil and karela from Sanskrit. Those from the Caribbean island of Jamaica commonly refer to the ...


6

Don't kill it, just learn to live with it and look how beautiful it is. If ever it takes too much space, reduce it mechanically by hand. Remember that plants are very strong and that products which are able to kill them hurt you also... You will save money, and learn more interesting things by tolerating wild flora in your garden! In fact you are lucky that ...


6

I believe this is Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinqefolia) on the basis of the five serrated leaves that have holes in the leaves that are the typical signs of being eaten by the grape flea beetle. This plant is a robust climber that is not be treated lightly. It is a member of the grape family and around this time of the year you can often find the ...


6

It's a clematis, a climbing vine with hundreds of cultivars. I originally thought it was a Jackmannii cultivar but the colour is not quite right. To confirm the identification look for tendrils that come off the vine and help it cling and older stems that are thin but woody. Propagation of the species is easy from seed, the cultivars may not be so vigorous. ...


6

Sounds like something in the cucumber family. There are only two species in Washington State in that family that have green, spiny fruit: wild cucumber (Echinocystis lobata) and coastal manroot (Marah oreganus). The Marah has larger fruit, so I reckon it is probably that, but that species is extremely rare in British Columbia, so I wonder if it is also rare ...


6

There are two basic varieties of Epipremnum, or Pothos (Devils' Ivy in the UK, and often still referred to as Scindapsis, its original Latin name) - one is variegated and the other is plain green. These days there are a range of variegated ones, but the basic species is either variegated or non variegated. The variegated ones like more light, and if they are ...


6

I think you are looking for a moss pole. They come in round and square shapes. Google Images Moss Pole.


6

This is a vigorous tropical climber. It can be propagated in numerous ways: cuttings rooted in water cuttings rooted in a medium like vermiculite or perlite layering where you root part of the stem in another pot As long as you have a node on the stem this plant is not fussy, almost anything goes! The one method of propagation that is unlikely when ...


6

I don't think it matters what material you use to train them, but what type of structure you provide for the plants to climb up. To create a foliage "wall" you'd be better off providing a net, in order for the ivy to spread out. Hanging ropes will lead to the thick "green lines" growing around individual ropes. http://www.slideshare.net/jinadevkv/green-...


6

The clematis you describe is probably the sweet autumn clematis which is sold as C. maximowicziana, C. paniculata and C. dioscoreifolia and is also remarkably similar in habit and appearance to the better behaved Clematis ligusticifolia 'Prairie Traveler's Joy' and Clematis mandshurica. hardy from zone 2 up fragrant autumn bloomer with small cruciform pure ...


6

Ah, so that's what you mean by Money Plant - this one's more commonly known as Devils Ivy or Pothos, but is, as you now say, Epipremnum aureum. It is on the list of plants toxic to rats, so again, I'd be very surprised if the damage has actually been caused by rats. That said, cut back the plant to remove badly damaged or unattractive areas - the odd hole in ...


6

I believe that's Chinese Stonecrop. I think we're having a hard time pinning it down because this species is most commonly seen today in the form of it's red-leaf-tipped cultivar "Coral Reef Stonecrop." My double-checking on this has led me to conclude the "Coral Reef" cultivar became so much more popular than the original that the cultivar name ...


6

It is Hedera helix 'sagittifolia', see the image below: Hedera helix 'SAGITTIFOLIA' It's hardy down to USDA zone 6 outdoors, but you're obviously growing it as a houseplant - it's a relatively slow growing variety and doesn't need sun exposure.


5

If your cucumber vine had a fungal infection, the cause was probably too much rain and too acid of a soil. Fungi spores are everywhere and blow around like dust in the wind. Plants survive this by being healthy, if they're not healthy, they don't survive it. Rather than trying to fight the fungi, I would focus my energy into fixing the soil for next year ...


5

This plant has several names such as pothos or Epipremnum aureum. Is an evergreen vine from the Australia/South Asia area and has become naturalized worldwide. The reason you do not see any flowers on this due to it's life cycle. Botanists saw two forms of the same plant: the juvenile form that you have that does not flower and whose leaves are not split ...


5

I agree, you certainly don't need a formal blueprint to construct a garden trellis. What I'd do on spacing is take the recommended support spacing for hardy kiwi, and use that as your standard since it is likely to be the largest, heaviest vine you will be planting. If you do this, your structure should handle any of the other vines you plan to put on it ...


5

I have a big 'compost pile', where truckloads of trimmings and weeds that aren't shredded/shreddable go. it is a larger scale, most likely, than what you have, but if you turn it over on a regular basis, like every few weeks, the ones that start will likely die after a few turns. Now, wisteria is easy to grow from semi-ripe cuttings, and I used to raise ...


5

I would guess that this 'weed' is a basal shoot from that large vine (which is some Clematis cultivar). You can see the fallen petals on the ground in the picture. Basal shoots are often different in color and form than top growth.


5

Judging by the seed description, the tendency to climb and the small tendrills at the top and the flattish stem together with fact that it's often in "seed mixes", this is most likely a Sweet Pea. Plant it near a fence or other structure where it can get a grip with the tendrils to climb or provide some other kind of support.


5

It depends on the building. If the building wall is made from brick, concrete etc, then a climbing vine is unlikely to damage it. If it has a textured plaster finish, then the vine will damage that. If it is wood, then it will tend to make the wood damp, and this can encourage borer attack. I think you're better off with a wooden house not to allow vines ...


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