22

Well, basically, the perched table is the saturation point, where the capillary action in the soil is canceled out by the force of gravity. Every type of growing media has a different perched table. Capillary action will pull water up from a certain point, and below that point, gravity keeps the water from moving up. The size of the container does not affect ...


12

This activity is called "gleaning". A word you will find in the Bible. For example, "And when ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not make clean riddance of the corners of thy field when thou reapest, neither shalt thou gather any gleaning of thy harvest: thou shalt leave them unto the poor, and to the stranger: I am the Lord your God." King ...


11

'Hardening off' is the process by which plants which have been somewhere sheltered and warm are toughened up or gradually acclimatized to live happily somewhere less sheltered and less warm. Plants sold at garden centres which are under cover or inside will need hardening off, but those outside in the open won't need hardening. Seedlings you've grown ...


10

Etiolation is long, spindly growth caused by poor lighting conditions. Plants will tend to be more yellowish because of chlorophyll lack. You will see it at its worst when trying to greenhouse start plants before you have enough sunlight to properly enable photosynthesis. The plants know they're light starved and are trying to grow tall enough to get it. ...


10

Hope this is what you were looking for. These pictures are all from the site of the Colorado Master Gardener Program. (There's much more extensive information there than I can copy here.) They have more diagrams, and the explanation are very good. You can also print them out: http://www.cmg.colostate.edu/GardenNotesUpdate.shtml This one gives definitions ...


9

Sour and sweet are different words for acid and alkaline, respectively. Going sour is usually a bad thing, but some plants (such as azaleas, blueberries, most conifers, etc) prefer sour soil. Some people also refer to soil as sour when it lies unused and gets a putrid, or fishy smell, often caused by too much water and rotting organic matter, but can happen ...


9

Seems it depends where you live! In the UK, a spade is most definitely not a shovel, they're two different tools intended for different usage. A shovel is broader, more curved from left to right, and sometimes longer in the blade, sometimes slightly broader at the sharp end, sometimes with a sort of ledge running either side down to the tip. Occasionally ...


8

There are many types of roses. I'll list a few here that are more common in modern times, with identifying features. Hybrid Tea: These are the result of crossing hybrid perpetuals with tea roses. These are upright, robust plants with long cane growth and less branching than some. Thorniness varies. The flowers are large, usually single, with high centers. ...


8

Vines are not a special group of plants, but - like trees and shrubs - defined by appearances. Vines have long stalks/shots/branches that are too weak to support themselves. Usually vines are divided in two subgroups, creepers and climbers: Creepers are vines that - if left alone - trail over the ground or hang down. If gardeners want them to grow upwards, ...


8

Basically allelopathy is a mechanism where one species of plant affects the growth of another via chemicals (typically exuded from roots). It can be both positive and negative, although gardeners usually use the term in its negative (growth inhibiting) context. A classic example is the black walnut tree which produces a chemical, juglone, which inhibits many ...


7

Wikipedia tells us that the kernels "are a type of fruit called a caryopsis", which is basically what the grain family (Poaceae -- grasses) produces. Corn, wheat, oats, etc are examples of this type of fruit.


7

At least in America, distinctions fade with distance from our more rural past. Today the words are used interchangeably except by specialists, but the spade is for digging, the shovel is for scooping. This difference manifests itself as an angle in between the handle and blade of a shovel while the spade is more or less straight from handle to blade. The ...


7

Hydrophobic soils repel water or absorb it weakly. The opposite term is hydrophilic.


7

Annual means that the plant has a full life cycle (seed-to-seed cycle) in at most one year. It will germinate, bloom and die that year. This is not a calendar year per se. Some species germinate in autumn, survive through the winter and bloom next spring. A good example is the French Marigold. A biennial plant takes two years to complete it's life cycle. It ...


7

That is called pollarding. It is a pruning system that promotes uniform yearly growth, in dense heads over the tree. You basically cut the branch ends at a certain diameter, and remove all smaller growth. Then on a yearly to almost a 20 year basis, remove the shoots that form, at the base. the result is the formation of these clublike heads, which grow in ...


7

Standard, in this context, means trained into tree form. Usually standard shrubs and vines are trained from a young age, allowing only one stem to grow from the ground, forming the trunk. This must be kept free of sideshoots and laterals up to a certain point, which makes up the head of the standard. A good head will look bushy and balanced, and fit with the ...


7

Well, thank you for bringing this up; Decurrent is a synonym of 'running down the stem'...I found the same site I think that you read this description. Decurrent or running down the stem I think this has to do with the awls or how the leaves attach to the stem. They use wide flaps to wrap around the stem...I am still working this one out... Edit: John, I ...


6

Apical dominance is a type of growth habit in woody and herbaceous plants where an apical bud (or a bud at the apex typically the top) secretes growth hormones down into the plant that dictates the growth habit for the entire plant. The best example is seen in Firs and Spruces that naturally grow in a conical formation. The apical bud is controlling the ...


6

Bulbs Bulbs are plant storage organs generally grown underground, consisting of a short stem (the basal plate), from which grow overlapping, swollen leaves or leaf bases. The top growth emerges from the bulb center. Here's an example: Corms Corms are not made up of leaves, but a vertical swollen compact stem, and as such are solid. The corm is protected ...


6

Yes, they are the same species. Moench put it as different genus (Majorana), but still keeping references to Linnaeus' Origanum majorana. So they are the same species, and both are acceptable (and valid) names, but the currently accepted name is Origanum majorana. I use the Plant List: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-143853 This database is ...


5

Because perennials generally last the longest, people often choose them first when designing their garden. Among other things, this broad category includes popular bulbs like tulips and daffodils, and flowers with many varieties, like lillies. Learn2Grow offers detailed information about annuals, biennials and perennials, as well as links to other sites. ...


5

People often talk about compost going sour when you have too much nitrogen and it starts smelling and rotting instead of composting because the bacteria release ammonia. Or, it could be caused by too much water and not enough oxygen so anaerobic bacteria start dominating the process. The same phrase can apply to soil if it stays wet for a long period of ...


5

The term I've generally heard used for this is "harvesting". Technically, uprooting or cutting the weeds only really covers disconnecting the plant from the ground. Harvesting, however, also includes the collection and removal of said weeds, which is necessary for actual control of the issue. This publication by Virginia Tech mentions it specifically as ...


5

Chill conditioning or chill requirement. Certain plants need certain hours of chill time to increase production. For those plants you need to get the right amount to strike a good balance between vegetative growth and fruit production. Good info on chill conditioning strawberries here.


5

Ok this one gets on my nerves! I live in the UK and have worked as a landscaper/labourer etc. But I'm pretty sure I've known the distinction between a spade and a shovel since I was a kid. Two different things! I've done work for friends before and I've said "fetch me a shovel" and they've brought me a spade. And vice-versa. I was thinking how can you not ...


5

It would technically be topiary, meaning a plant shaped to grow in some decorative manner or form of the owner's choice - that could be a square, globe, pyramid and a myriad of other forms which might resemble animals, insects or birds, or spirals, or pillars, or even a human being. Note that plants used for topiary are those which respond well to regular ...


5

Probably you happen to be seeing mostly (likely due to locale) the output of one breeding program and that is their theme. Looking here, page 24 to 26, that would appear to be Arkansas; and many more names other than Triple Crown (from Maryland) that are not in that theme show up. Illini, (guess where that's from) Thornfree, Doyle Thornless, Black Satin, ...


5

It's said to derive from a British poem (which has also been described as a song) by John Gay, titled 'Black Eyed Susan'. The poem also refers to 'sweet william', which is possibly also the origin of the common name for Dianthus barbatus. Sounds like folklore to me - black eyed susan refers to the almost black eye in the centre of the flower. Why susan, who ...


5

These are generally known as 'stock' plants. Definition of stock plant Definition as written by talinum: A plant used to obtain propagating material, whether seed or vegetative material. source of definition: http://davesgarden.com/guides/terms/go/1219/#b as well as others.


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