4

If you have a magnolia tree nearby, then I think you're looking at one of its seedpods that has fallen or been carried by animals to your morning glory.


4

You can allow 'climbers' to trail by not providing support, but Wisteria is a poor choice - the flowers are formed as dangling racemes, so they wouldn't look great flat on the ground in contact with the soil. Wisteria is also very vigorous and would smother the whole area you've shown in the photos, reaching 35 feet by around 12 feet when mature, with a very ...


4

Depending on where you are located, your first frost will be anytime from now till mid-November. In any case, This is an annual morning glory, so it will do it's best to flower and go to seed before frost kills it. These plants sense seasonal changes by day-length, temperature changes, and a couple other things. These things tell the plant Fall is coming, ...


4

I'll share what I'm aware of regarding the seed color and flower color of Ipomoea alba. I am aware of only 2 seed colors that relate to different strains with somewhat different characteristics. The typical white flowered form produces light , medium and some darker brown seeds and these typically produce heart shaped leaves. There is a black seeded form ...


4

That's why they are called morning glories. That will happen any day that is warm/sunny. If it's overcast all day, and especially if it's cool, the blooms may remain open throughout the day, but if the sun is out, expect them to close as soon as it warms up for the day. The yellowing of the leaves is unrelated, and could be one of a number of things.


3

If it hasn't put out any new growth by this time, the plant is probably dead. You may have let it get too dry during the dormant period, or the plant may have been too warm. Plants like a climate change to go along with dormancy. The pot should have been kept at 45-55 degrees Fahrenheit until spring. These can be tricky to get from one season to the next ...


3

Morning Glory plants are very sensitive barometers. For the flower to bloom, their internal hydrostatic pressure must exceed the surrounding atmospheric pressure. These plants are pressurized by the atmospheric pressure, which peaks early in the morning, and then it gradually drops throughout the day. As the day progresses, whilst the surrounding ...


3

You have wooly aphids, a kind of aphids that grow a waxy, fluffy, wooly protective “fur”. The crawling insects might be adults, but without pictures, a definitive id is nearly impossible. Treatment options are manual removal, predatory insects (either from your environment or bought), neem oil, insecticidal soap, chemical sprays or systemic insecticides. ...


2

Because you've bought only one variety of Ipomea seeds, they will all be the same colour, because they'll only produce a particular colour flower. Generally, if an Ipomea seed is dark, the flowers it produces will be dark (say, purple) and if they're light (peanut butter coloured) they're likely to be pale (pink, possibly). So your suggestion is accurate - ...


2

If you mean the wild type of morning glory (aka, bindweed) you are definitely in for a battle. However, I have had success in the past by removing as many of the plants and their roots as I could, then covering the ground with a dark mulch (many layers of newspaper, cardboard, or a good thick layer or two of heavy landscaping fabric) and after that, piling ...


2

I have similar problem with my chili plant. Its seems like a fungus problem in the soil if other leaves are also getting the spots. Change the soil entirely and check for root roth.


2

This is caused by excessive drying. I have seen this happen when Morning Glory vines found their way into a house and grew up to the window. Even though the temperature didn't go under 65 degrees Fahrenheit (it was summer), every leaf inside the building developed the dead areas on the leaves, but outside they were fine. I thought it was a humidity issue, ...


2

Morning glories love sun and even high temperatures shouldn't cause the damage shown. Have you added new soil or compost to the planter? Any slow release fertilizers? How regularly have you watered the soil in the planter? Not on a strict schedule but to make certain it's neither too dry nor not too wet. Start by thoroughly cleaning up your planter, ...


2

I started watering even more and it fixed it :)


2

Convolvulus is the common name in New Zealand... creeps thru everything and so hard to get rid of... dont throw it in your compost!!! Just keep digging it out as even the tiniest bit will regrow... basically you can only keep on top of it and sometimes never get rid of it!!


2

Look carefully at the join of the one leaf stalk and the stem. If there is a sign of growth in there then you may be in luck. With your rooted leaf in a moist planting compost, trim off what is clearly dead or dying and keep warm and minimally watered in filtered light and you might just get lucky. If not, at least an important lesson learned. You might want ...


1

The close-up picture shows an obvious basal stem rot. As I cannot examine it through the screen as good as by physically holding it, I advise you to check the "brown portion" close to soil level. Scratch the bark and see if the browning is just a different color [the stem beneath is green] or a dead stem [the stem is brown; sometimes a soft rot, ...


1

This looks like thrip to me. The indications are long thin looping trails where the larvae are eating inside the leaf and small black spots of "frass" or poop. Adult thrip can often be seen under the leaf and they are the size of an exclamation mark. Thrip cannot be effectively controlled by soap and water or any contact insecticide as the larvae ...


1

Haven't found records of that hybrid, just that crossbreeding has been done between Ipomoea nil and Ipomoea purpurea. http://mg.biology.kyushu-u.ac.jp/Yoneda_DB/E/species/hybrids.html


1

Ipomoea and virus Ipomoea leaf with viral infection This looks like a viral infection. Not insect at all. "Sweet Potato Latent Virus". Insects may have been the vector. There are quite a few ipomoea viruses. Make a positive positive ID first.


1

Had a bit of trouble working out what your container looks like, but you seem to be saying its five feet long, by 9 inches wide with a depth of 7 inches from top to bottom. Jury's still out on whether you really mean 7 inches wide and 9 inches deep from top to bottom, that's what I'm not entirely sure about. Either way, 10 morning glories and 8 trailing ...


1

I've used Grazon (trichlopyr but DON'T use Tordon as it will kill the other plants too) - in the past to kill roots by putting the mix in a container, cutting off the plant about a foot above the ground and feeding the cut end into the container - let it have a good drink, do probably twice for each square metre. If you spray it I wouldn't advise Roundup ...


1

I've always let my morning glories reseed. For years, they come back just as beautiful as the year before. I'd just give it some more time for the warmer weather to stick around


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