15

A healthy, mature, Aloe Vera will bloom (flower) when it's ready... Which translates into -- as far as I'm aware you can't "force" an Aloe Vera plant to bloom, it will flower once it reaches maturity (roundabout 4 years old), is in good health and has stored up enough energy to-do-so. Below are some points which will help keep a potted Aloe Vera plant in ...


15

If I get your question right, should you pinch the buds of the basil plant before they flower in order to maximize leaf production? Answer yes. If you don't trim the buds off, then they will flower, growing up into a tall stalk on your basil plant and producing a tower of seeds. Producing seeds will become Basil plant's "Job 1", and it will neglect leaf ...


12

Yes you can. This actually an old German Advent/Christmas tradition in honour of St. Barbara's Day (Dec. 04) and it's usually done with branches of cherry or apple trees. Forsythia will work fine, too. Branches cut on 12/04 should flower by Christmas. The basic idea is to take branches that have had "winter" (that is, some frost), bring them inside and "...


12

That is lantana. ASPCA Website says: "Lantana Additional Common Names: Shrub Verbena, Yellow Sage, Red Sage Scientific Name: Lantana camara Family: Verbenaceae Toxicity: Toxic to Dogs, Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Horses Toxic Principles: Pentacyclic triterpenoids Clinical Signs: Vomiting, diarrhea, labored breathing, weakness. Liver failure - more common ...


9

You can also get blossom drop without fruit forming if the bushes are stressed by a lack of water. It is normal for the blossom to drop after the fruit forms. But if the fruit are not forming, you may have stressed plants.


8

Parsley is an umbellifer and a biennial. This says that the flowers are produced in umbrella-like clusters and its growth takes two years to complete; in the first year it focuses on growing a solid tap root, and in the second sends up a flowering stalk, flowers, and sets seed. I have much experience growing caraway, also a biennial umbellifer, for seed in ...


8

It is the vegetative state. I know two identification flora about vegetative state: Flora Vegetativa: in French or German, of Swiss wild plants The vegetative key to the British flora


7

I realize this answer is late -- you should be able to confirm by now -- but this is normal behavior. The flowers fall off and the little bit that is left behind becomes the berry.


7

Orange colored cannas invariably have orange or yellow streaks on the leaves. Yellow cannas don't have orange streaked leaves. The almost white canna's streaks or similar variations in foliage will be very pale.


7

You need only prune out the spent flower stalks. Aside from removing old leaves and flower stalks, yuccas do not require any pruning. If you need to prune to control height, prune in the spring before new growth begins. If the plant is well established, you can cut it off at any height (including ground level), and it will begin two to four new stems from ...


7

Okay, from your picture, those are Phalaenopsis orchids. They seem to be doing well in the light level you are giving them, although I don't think they need to be under a light 24 hours a day. In order to re-bloom a Phalaenopsis orchid, they need a rest where they are watered very sparingly, followed by a time of lower light levels until the new growth ...


7

Monarda (bee balm) likes damp, enriched soil, but also likes a lot of sun. They often don't flower in their first year, but I'd have expected flowers in its second year, certainly. If it dries out frequently, you may not get flowers, and depending on which variety you're growing, it might not be getting enough sun. If the soil it's growing in is poor and ...


7

This is Catharanthus roseus, commonly known as the Madagascar periwinkle or rosy periwinkle. It is native and endemic to Madagascar, but grown elsewhere as an ornamental and medicinal plant, a source of the drugs vincristine and vinblastine, used to treat cancer. Other English names include Vinca, Cape periwinkle, rose periwinkle, rosy periwinkle, and "old-...


7

I'd rather say this is an ornamental Aillium. They often use it to decorate my town. Here is how the head will look like if I'm not wrong: Might be a giganteum; in below picture you'll notice similar leaves.


7

I have a jacaranda, also not flowering yet, which I know to be a jacaranda because it was also planted from a seed. It seems to be pretty easy to sprout these jacaranda seeds, so I would be inclined to believe your e-Bay seller for that reason alone. But also your tree looks just like my J. tree: trunk-dots, fluffy leaves, branches, fast growing, everything. ...


6

Have you had unseasonably warm weather in the past few weeks? (we have down here in Texas). Unseasonably warm weather will often 'trick' plants into producing new leaves and/or flowers early. The real problem occurs if there's a frost which kills new buds/growth (I suspect daffodils are less prone to that than, say, fruit trees).


6

Artichokes are large and grow fast. It appears in your photo that there are more than one plant in a pot? Are these just side shoots from one plant? They can grow fine in a 10 gallon pot as an annual. If you live a zone (8-11 USDA) where the temperature never goes below 14 degrees F during the winter you can grow them out in the garden as a perennial. The ...


6

It may be inedible, but it's worth giving a leaf a taste to see if it is not too bitter. If it doesn't taste too bad, harvest the whole lot and eat some baby spinach salads. There may be some spinach varieties which are more resistant to bolting, but it's probably a better idea to simply let nature do what it's going to do. Some years are warm, and some ...


6

It's a clematis, a climbing vine with hundreds of cultivars. I originally thought it was a Jackmannii cultivar but the colour is not quite right. To confirm the identification look for tendrils that come off the vine and help it cling and older stems that are thin but woody. Propagation of the species is easy from seed, the cultivars may not be so vigorous. ...


6

It could be Corn marigold, Glebionis segetum, judging by the leaves, but ID should be easier once it flowers (which will be yellow, dandelion like ones if it is corn marigold) - it certainly looks like an opportunistic 'weed' plant, in which case, it's very likely to be highly attractive to bees and other insects. It might also, though, be very invasive, as ...


6

Some plums are inedible, from having too high a level of cyanide in the fruit. Sometimes they will also have high levels of oxalic, malic, and tartaric acid that cause inedibility. All those things you can taste, so if it's not bitter, or super sour, and it tastes like your average plum, it's going to be safe. Just make sure they are completely ripe and soft ...


6

Orchid need light. You should keep it in a well-lit place, but avoiding too much sunshine. Temperature should remain above 18°C. Orchid need to have breathing roots: you must make sure your pot allows sufficient air circulation. Your pot does not look like a regular for orchids. Here is an example: its ok to see the roots (I would remove the moss that hide ...


6

Although you've not specified clearly, from what you're saying you appear to be asking about Globe Artichokes rather than Jerusalem artichoke. I'm sorry to confirm that longstanding recommended practice says you should have removed the small heads which form in the first year as soon as they appear, and not allowed them to develop to any size. However, not ...


6

The term 'wood violet' is somewhat vague - this is actually one of the Oxalis varieties, so not a Viola at all; it's probably Oxalis latifolia, maybe Oxalis violacaea, often commonly known as wood sorrel (in the UK anyway). The easily identified foliage is not actually visible in the photograph with your question. Image of Oxalis latifolia here, but it's a ...


5

There is a small possibility that if you cut it off now, it may form more buds before the end of the growing season. If you're harvesting them to eat, you generally cut a couple of inches down the stem from the bottom of the bud; I don't see any reason to do it differently in your situation. On the other hand, the plant has already put energy into growing ...


5

Your spinach has bolted, and is (probably) no longer edible. To prevent this, predict warm years ;-) and plant earlier in them. Seriously, if you see that everything seems a couple of weeks ahead of normal, plant accordingly and hope for the best. If the weather turns cold against you, you can replant - better to be too early than too late.


5

It's a Kalanchoe, and they typically bloom in spring so it's natural for yours not to be bloom now. (You can find them blooming in the stores all year round, but those plants have been forced into bloom by their growers.) To get it to bloom again, give it: plenty of light -- where you have it looks OK. moderate water while it's growing, less during winter ...


5

I think these are Japanese cherries of the group of Cherry blossoms.


5

Excessive nitrogen, heat stress, insufficient or fluctuating water availability are the usual causes. If you know your plants haven't been subjected to fluctuation in temperatures, and you're not feeding excessively with nitrogen rich fertiliser, look at your watering regime. Water supplies should be regular and sufficient to the plant's needs when its ...


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