15

If I get your question right, should you pinch the buds of the basil plant before they flower in order to maximize leaf production? Answer yes. If you don't trim the buds off, then they will flower, growing up into a tall stalk on your basil plant and producing a tower of seeds. Producing seeds will become Basil plant's "Job 1", and it will neglect leaf ...


12

Yes you can. This actually an old German Advent/Christmas tradition in honour of St. Barbara's Day (Dec. 04) and it's usually done with branches of cherry or apple trees. Forsythia will work fine, too. Branches cut on 12/04 should flower by Christmas. The basic idea is to take branches that have had "winter" (that is, some frost), bring them inside and "...


12

That is lantana. ASPCA Website says: "Lantana Additional Common Names: Shrub Verbena, Yellow Sage, Red Sage Scientific Name: Lantana camara Family: Verbenaceae Toxicity: Toxic to Dogs, Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Horses Toxic Principles: Pentacyclic triterpenoids Clinical Signs: Vomiting, diarrhea, labored breathing, weakness. Liver failure - more common ...


11

It is a passion flower, but it's not Passiflora incarnata; your photo shows Passiflora caerulea. The rays on the first variety are wavy or crimped, whereas the second has generally straight but slightly curved rays, like those in your photo. P. caerulea is not quite so hardy as P. incarnata and may be killed back to the ground in a hard winter (temps below -...


8

Parsley is an umbellifer and a biennial. This says that the flowers are produced in umbrella-like clusters and its growth takes two years to complete; in the first year it focuses on growing a solid tap root, and in the second sends up a flowering stalk, flowers, and sets seed. I have much experience growing caraway, also a biennial umbellifer, for seed in ...


8

It is the vegetative state. I know two identification flora about vegetative state: Flora Vegetativa: in French or German, of Swiss wild plants The vegetative key to the British flora


7

Monarda (bee balm) likes damp, enriched soil, but also likes a lot of sun. They often don't flower in their first year, but I'd have expected flowers in its second year, certainly. If it dries out frequently, you may not get flowers, and depending on which variety you're growing, it might not be getting enough sun. If the soil it's growing in is poor and ...


7

Okay, from your picture, those are Phalaenopsis orchids. They seem to be doing well in the light level you are giving them, although I don't think they need to be under a light 24 hours a day. In order to re-bloom a Phalaenopsis orchid, they need a rest where they are watered very sparingly, followed by a time of lower light levels until the new growth ...


7

There is a small possibility that if you cut it off now, it may form more buds before the end of the growing season. If you're harvesting them to eat, you generally cut a couple of inches down the stem from the bottom of the bud; I don't see any reason to do it differently in your situation. On the other hand, the plant has already put energy into growing ...


7

This is Catharanthus roseus, commonly known as the Madagascar periwinkle or rosy periwinkle. It is native and endemic to Madagascar, but grown elsewhere as an ornamental and medicinal plant, a source of the drugs vincristine and vinblastine, used to treat cancer. Other English names include Vinca, Cape periwinkle, rose periwinkle, rosy periwinkle, and "old-...


7

I'd rather say this is an ornamental Aillium. They often use it to decorate my town. Here is how the head will look like if I'm not wrong: Might be a giganteum; in below picture you'll notice similar leaves.


7

I have a jacaranda, also not flowering yet, which I know to be a jacaranda because it was also planted from a seed. It seems to be pretty easy to sprout these jacaranda seeds, so I would be inclined to believe your e-Bay seller for that reason alone. But also your tree looks just like my J. tree: trunk-dots, fluffy leaves, branches, fast growing, everything. ...


6

It's a clematis, a climbing vine with hundreds of cultivars. I originally thought it was a Jackmannii cultivar but the colour is not quite right. To confirm the identification look for tendrils that come off the vine and help it cling and older stems that are thin but woody. Propagation of the species is easy from seed, the cultivars may not be so vigorous. ...


6

Artichokes are large and grow fast. It appears in your photo that there are more than one plant in a pot? Are these just side shoots from one plant? They can grow fine in a 10 gallon pot as an annual. If you live a zone (8-11 USDA) where the temperature never goes below 14 degrees F during the winter you can grow them out in the garden as a perennial. The ...


6

It could be Corn marigold, Glebionis segetum, judging by the leaves, but ID should be easier once it flowers (which will be yellow, dandelion like ones if it is corn marigold) - it certainly looks like an opportunistic 'weed' plant, in which case, it's very likely to be highly attractive to bees and other insects. It might also, though, be very invasive, as ...


6

Some plums are inedible, from having too high a level of cyanide in the fruit. Sometimes they will also have high levels of oxalic, malic, and tartaric acid that cause inedibility. All those things you can taste, so if it's not bitter, or super sour, and it tastes like your average plum, it's going to be safe. Just make sure they are completely ripe and soft ...


6

Orchid need light. You should keep it in a well-lit place, but avoiding too much sunshine. Temperature should remain above 18°C. Orchid need to have breathing roots: you must make sure your pot allows sufficient air circulation. Your pot does not look like a regular for orchids. Here is an example: its ok to see the roots (I would remove the moss that hide ...


6

Although you've not specified clearly, from what you're saying you appear to be asking about Globe Artichokes rather than Jerusalem artichoke. I'm sorry to confirm that longstanding recommended practice says you should have removed the small heads which form in the first year as soon as they appear, and not allowed them to develop to any size. However, not ...


6

I don't know about flowers, but for vegetables, I like to use humidity domes. I just cut off the bottom of a milk jug, throw the cap away and put it over my newly transplanted plants, if it still frosts. This seems to work for fairly cold temperatures, in my experience (at least down to 23° F. at the side of our house, if not colder, which is to say -5° C.) ...


6

The term 'wood violet' is somewhat vague - this is actually one of the Oxalis varieties, so not a Viola at all; it's probably Oxalis latifolia, maybe Oxalis violacaea, often commonly known as wood sorrel (in the UK anyway). The easily identified foliage is not actually visible in the photograph with your question. Image of Oxalis latifolia here, but it's a ...


6

Ricinus communis, common name - castor oil plant. Details here and here.


5

Excessive nitrogen, heat stress, insufficient or fluctuating water availability are the usual causes. If you know your plants haven't been subjected to fluctuation in temperatures, and you're not feeding excessively with nitrogen rich fertiliser, look at your watering regime. Water supplies should be regular and sufficient to the plant's needs when its ...


5

I think these are Japanese cherries of the group of Cherry blossoms.


5

Alright, so the first thing I'd suggest is looking up a channel on youtube.com called 'Brad's Greenhouse'. It's a dude in Canada that has a ton of great videos, including a pretty extensive one on these store bought phals. I'll try to give an overview here. I'll be honest in saying that while my phals are healthy, mine haven't re-bloomed. I also haven't ...


5

If you bought these plants this year, even though they're growing in close proximity, and even if the Reaper pollinates a bell pepper, it won't affect the plants or fruits - it only affects the seeds within, which will now be some sort of cross between the peppers if you grow from them next year. If, though, you grew these yourself from seeds you saved, and ...


5

So you are saying you have not fertilized since you purchased these plants? That is a very good thing. Their time at the nursery you have no way of knowing. One could have been in the greenhouse under the artificial lighting, another might have sat on the truck in cold conditions and the dark and who knows what formula and when they were fertilized. It ...


5

Roses supplied in the condition you describe are known as 'bare root' in the UK, so 'nude root' is just another way of saying the same thing. Both these roses need to be planted in the ground, outdoors - pot growing will restrict their roots and growth and they may not develop and flower very well kept in pots, although it's fine initially. Mr. Lincoln is ...


5

You'll find them sold as bacopa, a trailing plant usd in many planters. It's not the real bacopa (Bacopa genus plants) but Chaenostoma cordatum (synonym Sutera cordata). You can see a photo and read how to care for it (very easy care!) at Bacopa Plant Info: How To Grow A Bacopa Plant It's treated like an annual but actually it's a tender perennial. It ...


5

You were pretty close when you described the "thing" as a bean, because like a bean, it's a seedpod - your aloe was pollinated and has set seeds in three pods. You could let the pods dry - when ripe, they should open up a little. At that point, you could carefully pick them and collect the seeds to plant in other pots or cells. If I remember ...


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