9

In the UK, where I live, none of this is necessary, so I've just been researching this subject. It seems that what you are doing, all parts of the procedure, are essential if you want your roses to survive undamaged through such hard winter weather. Primarily, mounding up is to protect the graft union, because if that gets damaged, the graft will fail; the ...


8

If you are in a place that's so consistently cold that it occurs to you to set up a backyard skating rink that means it gets really cold throughout the winter. What the ice and plastic has done is insulated the grass below from the wind and colder temperature. It may seem counter intuitive but the ice was actually helping keep the cold wind from lowering the ...


8

According to Wayne K. Clatterbuck in the article Tree Wounds on the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Tree Care Kit: Research indicates that wound dressings (materials such as tar or paint) do not prevent decay and may even interfere with wound closure. Wound dressings can have the following detrimental effects: Prevent drying and encourage fungal growth ...


6

I don't know about flowers, but for vegetables, I like to use humidity domes. I just cut off the bottom of a milk jug, throw the cap away and put it over my newly transplanted plants, if it still frosts. This seems to work for fairly cold temperatures, in my experience (at least down to 23° F. at the side of our house, if not colder, which is to say -5° C.) ...


6

Whilst it was once considered essential to paint wounds on trees with a protective/preventive treatment (Arbrex, for instance), this practice has long since fallen out of favour - turns out it often caused more trouble than leaving the sites untreated. It sounds like you've only removed dead parts anyway, so there's much less risk of any infection gaining ...


5

Have you tried? Basically a good, sharp chainsaw will pretty much chew through nails and wire embedded in timber. That doesn't mean you want to do it! You want to ensure your saw avoids contact - even briefly - with metal obstacles in your wood. Because such contact will very very quickly blunt your saw. And if you value your time at all, you don't want ...


5

I can tell you what not to do and what I see landscapers doing. Do not put the root ball near the cab and lay the tree down so the trunk bounces up and down on the tail gate. This will damage the bark and cambium at the point of contact. Your chances of the tree dying back at the point of damage are high. Do not drive fast! Wind shear will damage the new ...


4

Not a good idea - fleece will likely encourage fungal infection, will block or filter any available sunlight and daylight, and reduce the plant's capacity for photosynthesis, plus, unless its tied tightly round the plant (which will likely damage the plant anyway), is very unlikely to keep out aphids. You can construct a small fruit cage later on to try to ...


4

There is a good chance you have Codling Moth infestation. There are pesticides that can help but you can also likely fight back without chemicals by removing much of the fruit early in the year so that none of the pears are touching each other on the tree and by picking up and disposing (offsite) of any fallen fruit ASAP. Also dispose far away from your ...


4

Another programmer/gardener here. :) I've heard what you're describing referred to as "non-organic mulch." It doesn't decompose and enrich the soil the way organic mulch would, but that also means it's lower maintenance. Like organic mulch, it can help retain soil moisture and reduce wind-blown dust. It also helps keep small animals from digging in ...


4

I don't see that the layer of low nutrient soil will help much, but crushed rock can be beneficial. I have used them in a 3" layer on larger pots, with good results. The biggest problem with it is repotting, but that is only a minor nuisance. I've found the same thing regarding watering. Rocks also keep the plants cleaner, by minimizing soil splashing.


4

Well as you're talking about seedlings, these would often be planted in a cold frame - this has sides and a back and front, but a glass lid that can be left open during the day and closed before night falls to keep the seedlings warmer. A cloche is often removed during the day for a period of time if the weather is fair, and replaced before nightfall, in the ...


4

They're called tree shelters or tree guards, but there are other types of shelter for other plants. The only ones I know about are made by a company called Tubex in the UK, not sure if they supply outside Europe. There are also spiral tree guards, which are meant to go around the trunk or stem - Ebay in the UK currently has them available, maybe they're ...


4

I use vinyl tree guards for this, when planting out trees. They look like this: They are reusable, and if you find a good supplier, they're extremely cheap.


4

If your netting is wide-meshed enough, most likely the bees won't be bothered by it. For a bee it makes no difference whether a string from the net, a twig or something else is in the way. It will just be some kind of obstacle to fly around.


4

For 100% certain protection put the fence up asap. Orchardists have been researching this for years and fencing is the only guaranteed protection. An 8' tall fence if vertical, or 5' height if slanted outwards at 45 degrees, have become standard. It may help to not have a defined upper limit to the fence (such as a solid 2x4 to rail). If the deer cannot ...


4

Creosote would have been the go to for this, but in the EU (and ongoing, still in the UK, regardless of Brexit) only professionals are licensed to use it because of its carcinogenic properties. There is a kind of replacement called Creocote which does not have the same problems and is more environmentally friendly; it is still oil based, unlike most of the ...


3

To add on to what Tea Drinker says, which is what happens on contact with metal, I don't ever use a chainsaw without wearing goggles, a helmet with mesh visor, protective chaps, heavy-duty gloves (make sure they don't go up past your wrist, or they will be easy to catch onto), and tight-fitting heavy-duty long sleeve shirt. I've never had any accidents. I ...


3

It will really depend on the dog. A lot of people say strong smelling items such as Ammonia, vinegar, and citrus oils will deter a dog from coming near the area. Others say to use Chili Pepper. Potentially some plants with strong scents will deter just the same. However, my personal experience is that my dog is NOT deterred by any of that. I had to resort ...


3

First of all thank you for the detailed pictures. Even with the detail that can be observed here we may not be able to come up with a definitive answer. This is what I notice: from the first picture the plants appear to have been started from cuttings as is the usual practice but the stems of the cuttings look a little short. Depending on the time taken to ...


3

The stakes will dry out and die very soon after cutting. You do not really have anything to worry about. They do not leach enough nutrients out of the soil to make any difference to the tomato plants whatsoever. You can use them upside down like I do with branch stakes. The small end is easier to push or pound in anyway.


3

Sounds as if you are due for a greenhouse. For your starts. There is deer fencing that comes in a package...plastic webbed fencing very very tall. Hard for deer to see and right there is a deterrent. You could get your starts thriving in 10 to 20 gallon pots (use potting soil....). By then you should be able to construct a deer fence; these fences are ...


3

For immediate protection, I can highly recommend motion detecting, animal repelling sprinklers. I have used the scarecrow to protect rose of sharon shrubs for several years. I know it works because occasionally I'll use the hose for something else and forget to reconnect it. 24hrs without the Scarecrow on and the shrubs will get hit badly. There are other ...


3

We protect our nursery stock and customers' landscaping with DeerPro Winter Animal Repellent. One spray in the fall protects all winter long.


3

I like the idea of the motion detecting sprinklers. I also know that electric fencing will probably be your best bet. You should look on youtube for this guy, but one man I saw, put in some metal t-posts and ran a strand of 15lb test fishing line at ~4' high. The idea was that that thickness of line was too thin to see and too heavy to easily break. The deer ...


2

You could put some material on the sides which are open to block cold winds and trap heat better, but it strikes me that your cloche is very low to the ground, too, so it won't be useful for terribly long. Once the seedlings are on their second set of leaves, they'll already be too tall for it. Is it worthwhile to create a cloche that can only provide ...


2

Another thing your cloche might help with is preventing rain from getting to the seedlings or plants underneath it. Which is actually a useful thing if you are getting too much rain during the rainy season and wish to cut down on the chances of root rot or mold on the leaves.


2

Just make sure you pick one that's actually mesh - there's a wide range available, and some of them look almost solid, in other words, the mesh element is entirely covered by plastic, so it looks more like a roll of material or cloth, and that won't be great for covering trees. Other versions are actually mesh, often sold as scaffold safety netting rather ...


2

This late in the season I would put them in a garage or similar space. This would also give some weather protection ( in pots is not the same as in the ground). Then put up your 12 foot + deer fence . If it is a solid fence and the deer can not see the other side , you only need 6 feet. If you leave them out, the deer will eventually eat the buds. With snow ...


2

As others have pointed out, a shroud of fleece will trap moisture and prevent airflow, encouraging fungal diseases. It will also prevent pollinators getting to the flowers, but this is only an issue while the bush is flowering and before it sets fruit. Depending on your location, a currant may have blossomed already. My gooseberry has. The main insect pest ...


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