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7

This type of occurrence is called a split due to a weak crotch and two competing leaders. The split has been inevitable for many years, and was just waiting for the weight of wood on one side or the other to pull the branch down. It is quite commonly seen. The activity in the root zone probably has no relevance; while this may have reduced the overall vigour ...


6

Looks like root rot, probably caused by an oomycete called Phytophthora (genus). Wikipedia says: Root rot can occur in hydroponic applications, if the water is not properly aerated. This is usually accomplished by use of an air pump, air stones, air diffusers and by adjustment of the frequency and length of watering cycles where applicable. That is ...


6

Your tree looks very healthy. The depression between the trunks looks amazingly clean and dry! Keep on doing what you are doing because it is working. I see that your neighbor to the west has an even larger tree. Have you talked with your neighbors/friends who have these mature oaks next to their home what they have done and how often these trees break ...


4

Start by cutting out any more of the rotted root should you find it. Leave healthy root intact, but be thorough with any diseased part. Ask a local nursery to see if they sell fungicide and consider applying that on the healthy part. Choose a new pot, wash and dry the pot thoroughly. Wash the plant and wipe with paper towels to dry and clean the surfaces. ...


4

Your tree is a very, very old lady - average productive life span for a plum tree is around 10-20 years, though it obviously varies between individuals and many go on for longer, getting more gnarly as they do, see here https://www.hunker.com/12272347/fruit-tree-life-expectancy But 50 years and still fruiting well is quite remarkable, although it is not ...


4

Yes. This is similar to another thread which has a more detailed answer to this question. My aloe plant displayed the same symptoms when it was potted in a regular potting soil. When I replaced that soil with play sand with just a few clumps of manure the problem disappeared. I didn't need to apply any medicine to the plant, and it is now over 10 years old....


4

Creosote would have been the go to for this, but in the EU (and ongoing, still in the UK, regardless of Brexit) only professionals are licensed to use it because of its carcinogenic properties. There is a kind of replacement called Creocote which does not have the same problems and is more environmentally friendly; it is still oil based, unlike most of the ...


3

It is better not to use soil right now. Wait until it dries completely and plant something very hardy there. The pot is OK to use, just wash it with hot water.


3

This plant can be rejuvenated but it should not be over or under watered in the short term. cut all dead leaves off do not keep the plant soaked for a few days at least add a wick so it can become a self watering plant (special pots or a strip of cotton will do) See this answer for more detail


3

It does seem to me by the photos that it could be root rot, but really hard to say 100%. The best advice i can give you is to remove the plant from its pot and make sure you remove as much soil from the roots as possible, washing the roots gently is the best method for soil removeal. after replace the soil with fresh heathy uncontaminated soil. i have ...


3

We had the same type of rot in various Birch trees, however there weren't any termites or other insects. It appeared to have been caused by some sort of fungus that caused it to rot from the inside out, producing a similar strange brown/black rotted wood mass. I wouldn't take any chances though, especially as you mention that there were already termite ...


3

Botrytis cinerea. The plants were already infected when stored, that's why it's important to treat plants during their lifecycle. High humidity and low ventilation speed up the development of the fungus.


3

where are you located? Depending on where you are located, you might need to seek specifically available advice. Internal Decomposition can be quite tough in terms of root cause determination. It is likely that the problem is fungal or bacterial in origin, and the fact that it has been ongoing for 3 years means the problem is deep. Heat should affect the ...


3

Since you're starting with soiless systems, the time for severe fungal infections takes longer to develop. But they do. And it may be that the seedlings get infected before transplantation into the hydroponic systems as they may not be grown in sterile media. Run to waste systems seem more prone to symptomatic infection then recirculating systems ...


3

If the 'crumbling' area is at the base of the tree, it sounds as if the problem causing it to die is coming from the root. You haven't said what the diagnosis from the tree surgeon was as to the cause of the tree dying, but if he did tell you, that would be useful to know. On the assumption that the problem is at the base/root of the tree, then the twelve ...


2

It looks like slime mould and I'm pretty sure it is - it's possible for this to grow over and in moss if the area has been pretty wet for a while, the same way it can on lawns. You could try blasting the affected areas with a high pressure hose, or at least with the tap turned on full. If that doesn't work, what will work is mosskiller - which of course you ...


2

It looks to me as if, originally, it was planted just a bit too deep, and when you 'sloppily' repotted it, and subsequently, you planted it at the same or even a fractionally deeper level. In both 'arms' that have rotted, its apparent that some of the ridged growths were below soil level, and that's where the rot started, probably caused by damp soil sitting ...


2

I am not sure what I should be seeing. Is it the branch closest at a 45 degree angle? That blackish scab on the end? Welp let me tell you you haven't a single thing to worry about. Totally normal. Think about these plants in the wild with all the wind and wildlife...The spines have taught much wildlife to stay away...You should not do one thing ...


2

How big are your cuttings? Best thing to do is just take one node and leaf, and let it root in water. Do it for all the node/leafs you have taken from the plant. Important factors are light and temperature, they need indirect light and warmth. There is a nice video here on youtube, the first part is about propagation, the second part about the hydroculture ...


2

If the second picture shows the roots or what is left of them you bet this is root rot. You plant looks healthy, new leaves as well. Except for the root rot bit. Did that come out of the same pot/plant? I would transplant that plant into fresh potting soil after bleaching/cleaning the pot. Too much water. Don't allow the plant to sit in a water filled ...


2

If you have fungus gnats, that is an indicator that the soil in the pot has been or is too wet. It may be the plant already had this problem when you bought it, that's hard to know, but do you empty out that outer pot 30 minutes after watering so the plant is not left sitting in water? If not, start doing so. More information on fungus gnats and how to deal ...


1

The stuff in the pitcher, and the pitcher itself, are rotting. Given the color I'd say you gave it too much food. Stick with smaller flying insects, or better yet, a dilute fertilizer like Maxsea or Jack's, especially if it's going to be indoors. I use 1/4 tsp of Jack's All Purpose 20-20-20 to a gallon of distilled water, and fill the pitchers ~1/2 full (do ...


1

It's hard to say for sure from the picture, but it doesn't look good. The top part looks pretty good relative to the bottom. Is it soft or just discolored? If it's soft I recommend cutting it off above the bad part and let it rest in a shady but airy place for the wound to heal over or "cork". Find some actual cactus/succulent soil if possible. The ...


1

If you had the plant for some time (like longer than a year) dispose of the soil anyway - it will be exhausted, and any new plant you want to replace it with, if it actually needs a bigger pot, should be repotted using new, fresh potting soil. If you have space outdoors, just spread the spent potting soil over the surface of the soil to get rid of it - ...


1

What you're looking at there is not the bark, but the heartwood of the tree which has been exposed via some kind of injury to the outer layers of the tree. The heartwood is effectively "dead" anyway and does not play a major role in the tree's biological processes, but it does provide structural strength. The holes you can see are most probably created by ...


1

If the coloring in this picture is close to natural then I see a less than vigorous plant that is in need of chemistry (nutrients) necessary with which to do photosynthesis to make its own food/energy. Have you given this plant any balanced fertilizer at all? If so what and when? The other issue is the amount of light. What is the light source for your ...


1

Not sure what's caused the problem, causes can be physical damage, cold damage or insect invasion, but stone fruit trees like plum are very prone to getting something called gummosis - whilst I can't actually see any heavy weeping going on, there does appear to be something that looks like amber coloured ooze in the area at the top of the damaged bark in ...


1

Overwatering is the cause of the majority of indoor plant deaths. This usually goes hand in hand with not enough light. We tend to think if we can see indoors then that is enough to grow a plant. Outdoor light levels are commonly measured at 100,000 lux. Indoor light levels range from 20 to 1000 lux. A reduction in light reduces the amount of plant ...


1

I pretty much do the same thing as bamboo. We have it here in our office. I take care of the office plants. Typically, I end up cutting this stuff off about a 1/2" above a growth node and throwing it away, because we've filled tons of pots with it. It grows like crazy for this low light environment. So, like Bamboo, I take a cutting, which is usually ...


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