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14

There is a lawn reinforcement solution, but it requires work to fit it. There are products generally known as cellular grass pavers - they are often found in places like hospital car parks and comprise a cellular construction, usually made of concrete for heavy duty areas like car parks, and the empty cells are filled with soil and sown with grass. Its a ...


10

This is one job that I get to do quite often each year. Grass doesn't grow as well in wood chips as it does in topsoil, so be prepared for some digging. I find that a pitchfork is often easier to use than a spade shovel. Tree stumps often have a surprisingly high quantity of chips once ground out. Be prepared to take more than an hours work on just this part....


10

With those long underground rhizomes (the thick white runners you see) and upright growth this appears to be quackgrass (Elymus repens). Unfortunately, controlling it isn't much easier with that bit of knowledge. Quackgrass is a tough competitor. There are no selective herbicides that can kill it without killing the lawn grass, and as you've discovered ...


10

I would put some stones, so that they lift most of the weight of cars, additionally they help the car to move without slipping, so making a lot less damages to the nearby grasses. Because the stones will be lower then the top part of leaves of grass, they are also not so bad, visually/aesthetically speaking. And I find a lot better then wet dirt. I find ...


9

They sell artificial turf at Lowes, Home Depot, and online. Check the carpet section of your local big box store. Then you won't have to worry about getting dirt in the garage, or house. The newer stuff is far more realistic than the old "Brady Bunch" style artificial grass.


9

ground prep is crucial for a new lawn. I assume sod was used in the front for appearance and cost, but the new lawn in the back was a starter blanket for lack of "street view" and return on the cost. Nothing beats sod. Period. I worked installs for landscape construction for nearly 7 years and the ROI on the sod was a bit more upfront for less hassle & ...


9

I went to Tractor Supply, a farm store, I'm sure there are others, and bought a 50 Lb bag of oat seed (hull on) for about $14.00. Horses like it. I put a 3/4 cup of seeds in wet dirt in a 12" clay or plastic pot drip tray catcher with some holes drilled in it for drainage. Cover the holes w windowscreen to minimize dirt leakage. Dirt's about 1.5 inches deep. ...


9

Your strawberry and veggie patches are almost done for the year where you live, so it seems to me it would be best to tackle them next spring. For now, I would cut down the weeds as close to the ground as possible, but not worry about getting rid of them altogether. In the spring, when the strawberries (and weeds) start coming back, you'll be able to hand ...


9

It depends on whether you want to keep the sod or no and if the ground is already pretty flat. I haven't used a sod cutter, but I think the ground has to be fairly level. I don't think it works well if there are dips in the ground. I think for 250sq/ft, which is around 16'x16', you can man up with a shovel and a pickmatic. Figure out where you want to have ...


9

Microclover (Trifolium repens var.pirouette) is a selection from the original white clover (Trifolium repens). It was bred and selected for its much smaller leaves, lower height, much less aggressive invasive tendencies, non clumping habit and its reluctance to produce flowers; flowering is undesirable in lawn clover, particularly where there are children. ...


8

Well a trimmer won't destroy the lawn but it won't do a good job. It is difficult to keep the trimmer head at exactly the same height. Try this: Use a sharpener on the blades, even sandpaper will help. oil all the moving parts of the mower, WD40, lubricating oil or whatever comes to hand Do wear protective gear when using a trimmer. Gloves and glasses ...


8

I see a problem with the size of the area. No groundcover will be so thick it will choke out grass or other wind borne seeds. After a while you will be looking at weeding and with the size of the area this means wading in. Tough... White clover is an excellent idea from @woodchips. I have used it to open up and enrich thick clay soil. There are other ...


8

If you are going to water after a period of stress then you need to keep watering it to keep it green during the summer. Grass has no problems going dormant in the summer but the turf opens up for weeds to get a hold. If you want to keep your lawn to a high percentage of grass and low amount of weeds then it needs to be watered during dry periods otherwise ...


8

It's for real, and it's not just a new notion. Foreclosures and drought probably have something to do with just how trendy it is right now. The first link below is to a July 2012 article that appeared in Business Insider. The second is to the website of a group formed in San Antonio due to "overwhelming foreclosures and drought." "The US Drought Is So ...


8

Composting Pros: germicide. Cons: it take times, some clover seeds can germinate after composting and it is not suitable for large gardens. Herbicides (Postemergent) Pros: As per @J. Musser 's suggestion > quick; especially on rocky and hard soil. Cons: all derivated from herbicide use and clovers may regrow. Herbicides (Preemergent ) Pros: quick method ...


8

If you are in a place that's so consistently cold that it occurs to you to set up a backyard skating rink that means it gets really cold throughout the winter. What the ice and plastic has done is insulated the grass below from the wind and colder temperature. It may seem counter intuitive but the ice was actually helping keep the cold wind from lowering the ...


8

I think you'd be better off (less TOTAL work) just filling in the holes gradually. Put 1/4" of soil in the deepest parts. Level it out with a fairly small rake (back of an actual rakehead or short board.) Wait for growth. Add 1/4" of soil, rake/level with a longer board/rakehead. Wait for growth. Add another 1/4", rake/level with an even longer board. Wait ...


8

While there are grasses that grow submerged or partially submerged, the picture you provided is not one of them. Your picture depicts a bouquet arrangement. It may be very simple and only include grass-like leaves, but that's all it is. Like putting flowers in a vase.


8

Since you are a renter, I would suggest embracing the moss as a short green groundcover that tolerates the conditions, since grass won't, and as a renter you can't solve the conditions that favor moss over grass growth. If you were not a renter you could (possibly, sometimes even owners don't own the trees that make their lawns shady) remove whatever is ...


8

I have one, bought last year. It's far more pleasant to use (quiet, not covered with green goo from head to toe) than my string trimmer, and also much easier to be selective with. Works far better than either a string trimmer or a lawnmower on tall grass and small brush. Works well in wet material. I don't concern myself with John Henry-eqse competitions ...


8

I think it could be a baby conifer tree. Those seem to have multiple bright green cotelydons and look sort of like that. I found a couple of pictures on the internet that didn't look exactly like the one you have, but had a certain resemblance, and there are certainly lots of different conifers out there. These are Douglas fir cotelydons, picture from ...


7

If you're lucky then gypsum will work on your clay, helping the clay break up. Put a bit of the clay in a glass of water for a few hours. If the water becomes milky, i.e. the clay disperses (without any human intervention such as shaking), then gypsum will work. Spread generous amounts of gypsum when the clay is moist or even additionally spike the clay ...


7

I disagree with advice about dethatching. In healthy cool season lawns this is not a problem. If you have excessive thatch it is because of the following: Excessive growth caused by over-fertilization and heavy watering; Infrequent mowing that creates long clippings; Heavy, compacted soils; Unfavorable soil conditions that interfere with ...


7

Edge your lawn by digging a trench. The edges should be defined as perfectly straight or if you are doing curves, keep the radius consistent until you change directions. If you use a string and stake, the stake is the center of your circle. That radius stays the same until you have to move the stake either outside your lawn or back onto the lawn. Doesn't ...


7

If you have enough soil to go on top, I recommend "sheet mulching" by putting down cardboard on top of the grass to kill it. Otherwise, it will inexorably work itself up, and you'll have a raised bed full of grass. This is the basis of so-called "lasagna gardening," where you layer cardboard, compost, soil, and mulch to turn lawn into garden space. If you ...


7

Having that concrete border actually makes this a much easier task than many of us (I have no separator, so it requires constant work) Two simple steps: Regularly through the growing season, use an edging tool to go around the grass edge of the concrete, cutting vertically through anything trying to grow beyond that demarcation line. Where seeds have ...


7

Definitely start with a soil test. You mention that the soil is black, rich, but artificial fertilizers and many pesticides can lead to biologically poor soil. Without good soil biology, much of the nutrients you dump on your lawn remains unavailable to grass. If you can afford it, get a bioassay done (like that from http://soilfoodwebnewyork.com/ but from ...


7

Treat it like a green roof. Use one of the green roof products as your base layer on the concrete and build something like this - minus the insulating layers. There are even growing mediums specifically designed for turf. The soil is engineered to drain well, and the drainboard will carry water to the extremities of the concrete area. This is likely to cost ...


7

I can't really answer this other than to say that you probably need to remove more depth of soil, and it would obviously have been best to deal with it when it happened rather than this much time later. Soil treatment with hydrated lime reduces leaching of hydrocarbons, but it still means you'd have to wait a good while before attempting to plant, because it'...


7

First, it sounds like you've had them in a bag for a while and depending on temperatures where you are, they may already be slimy and smelly. Otherwise, it will add to the organic content in the soil, but you can get the same result by applying it as a layer over the top and letting it rot down if the clippings are fresh. Doesn't look very attractive after a ...


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