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8

We often see fruit, small or full size, on saplings sold by garden centres, and these are surprisingly small trees. If the tree can't support the fruit, they'll just drop off. But if you want to give it the best shot of getting larger fruit, you should probably remove half the fruit at each location.


7

They will most probably yield some fruit, which may be edible - it probably won't grow very large. There is also a school of thought which says its better - long term - for you to remove these fruit so the plant can concentrate on growing.


7

Peach trees are deciduous and lose their leaves in the winter, so don't worry about that. The leaves can turn gold/brown before they drop. Some munched leaves on a healthy tree are not a problem. Hopefully you have a tree that requires very few chilling hours to produce, if it was purchased locally you should be okay. It is very young, but you should get a ...


5

Generally when the fruit is no longer green and releases easily from the tree it is ready. If it doesn't come off with a gentle tug wait a couple of days and try again. The small size is probably due to no one thinning the fruit earlier in the season.


5

This is the main problem of peaches, they will not create new twigs, so you should really prune heavily the tree, so that the bottom twigs are always healthy (and not overpowered by higher branches). The plants is already going too much in height. I would remove (after you have some peaches) the higher branches, so that the lower branches could expand.


5

Perhaps pollination is the problem. Plant some plants like lavender or any fragrant plants near the peach plant. This way bees and other insects will be attracted and they will pollinate the flowers to produce fruits. You can also try hand pollination. Usually a paint brush or a vibrating toothbrush is used for that. I hope it works for you.


5

Any chance it froze during or shortly after the bloom? Depending on the species, most peaches are quite hardy, we have several that tolerate a 25 degree freeze quite well with only, maybe a 5 percent loss of bloom. We got wiped out several times when it went just under 25 degrees. Really need some more info though. Is this a grafted "mini" tree? When you ...


5

From experience, in the hot summers of northern Portugal, peaches fruit even under partial shade but the fruit is not very sweet. The more direct sunlight the sweeter the fruit seems to be.


4

Yes, you can throw away the peach pits because they have mold. If the cherry pits are the same, throw them also. As for recommendations on how to optimize the process next time: PEACH The first thing to keep in mind is that early fruiting peach trees have immature embrios that will die before germinating. This is why you have to make sure you got the pit ...


4

Agree with Organic's answer - you may get fruit setting, but without sufficient UV rays on the foliage, less starch will convert to sugars within the fruits. They may ripen quite well, but will be less sweet.


4

I had a very similar situation with my indoor almond, when I forgot to water the plant for some time. In my case, I did not do anything about it afterwards, just provided regular watering, and wilted leaves all gradually dropped by themselves. However, new growth was strong. My advice is: Do nothing, except regular care, and pay special attention on ...


3

My best guess is that you have yourself a case of white root rot disease or maybe Armillaria root rot. Armillaria has a funky smell something like mushrooms. Either way, there is no cure and the treatment is to quarantine and destroy the effect entity. After you have disposed of the infected plant be sure to disinfect all your tools and any containers you ...


3

That looks like beetle damage to me. Beetles will sometimes not chew the veins.


3

When peaches are ready depends a lot on your tastes. However, if they're falling off the tree in large numbers, and you want to save all the peaches, it's probably a good idea to start picking them (or you'll lose a lot). You might just put something below to catch them and cushion their fall, and then shake off the ones that are loose; you can let the ...


3

None of the peach pit must be broken. Simply plant them in the fall, in the ground, and wait. Come spring, you will get some sprouts, and likely also some will fail to sprout, so plant more pits than you are trying to grow trees. Evidently the odds of getting an acceptable/palatable peach from a seedling tree are a bit higher than for apples; in neither ...


3

I'm not 100% sure there's no other problem, but your watering regime is insufficient - young woody plants require probably around 5-8 gallons of water a week each if the weather is hot and dry. It's also best to water more copiously and less often - giving a little every day encourages surface rooting, that is, the plant is learning that water arrives daily, ...


3

There are a lot of reasons but I can give you some general guidelines that will hopefully help you. Firstly, it takes a few years for a fruit tree to bear fruits in good quantity. The first few years the fruit production will be limited. While the fruit tree is growing, regular maintenance is very important to ensure it bears fruit year after year. ...


2

These seem to be Scale insects, you see the scale which protect the insects inside them. They eats the sap. If they are active, usually you find ants nearby, taking part of the sap. There are many types of such insects, with a lot of colours. These are very large, compared what I usually see. Insecticides which enter to sap helps. You can remove them and ...


2

This happens to a lot of plants when bright sunny days come suddenly. Make sure you water the trees as they are already stressed by the long bright days and prevent them suffering from drought also, otherwise some of the leaves might fall.


2

This peach tree looks incredibly healthy for being dug up and potted. Seriously! That graft or injury is just fine. Obviously because the top growth isn't even wilted! Your tree looks very healthy. It would not if there were any problems with this injury, from staking or graft? This looks just fine. Keep it watered. How long until it gets its new ...


2

Your tree dropping leaves is very normal. It is dormancy time so do not fertilize and make sure not to water unless that pot, soil and plant when you lift them are light. I would think about a new pot, clay. A few inches in diameter larger. Use ONLY potting soil out of a bag. No gravel beneath. Lift the bottom of the pot off the surface with a few thin ...


2

You've confirmed you did not harden off your peach tree before transferring it outdoors; there's nothing to be done about that now it's planted. It doesn't mean its going to die, just that it will likely suffer from any cool temperatures as well as suffering some sunburn. That just means the leaves you've got now might not look very good, or may even drop ...


2

Same experience here in MS, incredible amounts of rain. I would think the rug adds to the problem by holding the water. You may want to consider pulling the rug back during these rainy periods to allow it to dry a little quicker. Also, if the ground around the tree is depressed or does not drain well, that can add to the problem. I raised my young trees ...


1

On short term, you should choose which variety you want to keep. Forget to have 4 varieties: they will fight to have food from root. Only one will survive. [Such plants are scams from cheap gardening centers]. Now you should prune continuously, to have all branches with the same strength. The top branches will get naturally more, so you should prune some ...


1

Personally, I'd enjoy the blossom and fruit, ie leave them alone. The critical thing to aiding establishment of any tree is to keep the area around the trunk vegetation free. No weeds, no grass, nothing. Aim for a one metre clear circle with the tree in the middle. Mulch the circle if you like, but keep it vegetation free.


1

Black Cherry (Prunus serotina) is the best one where I am, because it's relatively fast growing (splittable wood every 12/18 years in decent conditions, and can be coppiced. The favorable smoke fragrance is very good with this species. It is hardy in zone 5.


1

This is a disease called brown rot it is very common and can be treated. Brown rot is a fungal disease that commonly affects stone-fruit trees like peaches and cherries. To treat I would start by first pruning out all signs of disease in limbs as soon as they appear and make sure to clean pruners between cuts. Then immediately dispose of prunings and other ...


1

Not necessarily, E.B. Keep that plant watered and I would get some shade cloth to cover it for a while. Acclimatization or hardening off takes weeks to ensure the plant's leaves epidermis gets thicker. Otherwise, your plant will get sunburn. Your plant has gotten sunburn and is in a bit of shock. Find some shade cloth; it is a black plastic fabric that comes ...


1

Anthony, I am sending a site of images showing phosphorus deficiency. Purple is pretty indicative of phosphorus deficiency. Have you used any fertilizer for this tree? Plants have to have the proper amount of chemicals (nutrients) just like the proper amount of water, drainage and light to make their own food and support their own health. Looks rather ...


1

This peach tree is infected with a fungus called Taphrina deformans that propagates itself by spores that overwinter on the tree's bark and buds. In the spring it starts a new life cycle, especially if the weather is cold and rainy. It stops its growth when temperatures rise above 82 degrees F (or 28 degrees C), but when the temperatures drop, the fungus ...


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