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6

This is Galanthus nivalis and it grows from perennial bulbs, that's why it comes back every year. If you want it to spread, separate the bulbs every few years. If you want to get rid of it, dig out the bulbs and cut the leaves as early as possible for the ones that you miss when digging out.


6

Well, asparagus is listed as deer resistant 1,2,3, etc, but in my experience, they love the new shoots, and can be almost as bad in this respect as groundhogs, at least in my yard. They do seem to avoid adult plants when possible. So, if you can't fence, it may get eaten as it emerges, as it sounds like your local deer are widening their menus.


5

No. Deer resistance is based on taste, not smell. You are confusing mammal pests with insect pests. If you look at the odor-based deer repellents they are super strong, and sometimes don't work. "Deer resistant" plants are plants the deer do not prefer, but they still still eat them if it's a harsh winter and there is no other food. We've had deer eat ...


5

There is a lot of anecdotal evidence on the web to suggest that blood-based repellents do work on deer. However, not everyone agrees. As deer are so olfactory-driven, it should last as long as the smell from the repellent lasts, and the deer aren't so hungry that your garden is their only option. Due to the high nitrogen content in blood, this will indeed ...


4

Product called Plant-scyd is a mix of pig blood and a sticking agent. It generally lasts a season if not rained on too frequently. It reeks Deer will overcome aversions when starving. Deer will adapt to almost anything odd with time. Leaving a few dead deer carcases around is quite beneficial, and is a lot less work to apply. Note: Local wildlife ...


4

If you're wrapping something round the trunks already, then that's likely to protect the bark from nibbling deer, and from their rubbing against it. However, you can also get proper Tree Guards, usually made of out of strong mesh, pre formed for you to use on your trees. They come in different heights, and if you have larger deer about, as opposed to ...


4

Yes, this works quite well. It's more work to put in, but if as you say it is necessary for aesthetic reasons not to have an 8' fence, go ahead. The specifications you have are good, but I'd like to add that using aluminum wire for the inside is far better than other things, as it never rusts, and is much easier for deer to see even than galvanized steel. It ...


4

For 100% certain protection put the fence up asap. Orchardists have been researching this for years and fencing is the only guaranteed protection. An 8' tall fence if vertical, or 5' height if slanted outwards at 45 degrees, have become standard. It may help to not have a defined upper limit to the fence (such as a solid 2x4 to rail). If the deer cannot ...


4

I do have personal experience, and it depends on snowcover and available food. Phlox subulata is not known to be deer resistant, so if it's an "open" winter and more tasty food is not available, the deer will browse the phlox but they probably won't kill it (they never killed mine). I've never seen deer dig it out from under snow, though, so if you're in a ...


3

Firstly, even if You were to populate an entire garden with plants that never produce flowers, it still wouldn't prevent yellow-jackets, wasps or hornets from flying in and possibly building their nests nearby because nectar isn't the only food source for them. You see, come spring all the way through summer, wasps need protein to support the hive and the ...


3

I like the idea of the motion detecting sprinklers. I also know that electric fencing will probably be your best bet. You should look on youtube for this guy, but one man I saw, put in some metal t-posts and ran a strand of 15lb test fishing line at ~4' high. The idea was that that thickness of line was too thin to see and too heavy to easily break. The deer ...


3

We protect our nursery stock and customers' landscaping with DeerPro Winter Animal Repellent. One spray in the fall protects all winter long.


3

For immediate protection, I can highly recommend motion detecting, animal repelling sprinklers. I have used the scarecrow to protect rose of sharon shrubs for several years. I know it works because occasionally I'll use the hose for something else and forget to reconnect it. 24hrs without the Scarecrow on and the shrubs will get hit badly. There are other ...


3

Sounds as if you are due for a greenhouse. For your starts. There is deer fencing that comes in a package...plastic webbed fencing very very tall. Hard for deer to see and right there is a deterrent. You could get your starts thriving in 10 to 20 gallon pots (use potting soil....). By then you should be able to construct a deer fence; these fences are ...


2

Garlic has done OK outside the fence, as have chives. Neighboring garden had apparent success with potatoes outside the fence (makes sense, the plant is poisonous.) Raspberries (and other bramble fruit) are generally OK. They have not hassled my blueberries as far as I recall, though plenty of smaller beasties go for the fruit. I've had no noticeable trouble ...


2

This late in the season I would put them in a garage or similar space. This would also give some weather protection ( in pots is not the same as in the ground). Then put up your 12 foot + deer fence . If it is a solid fence and the deer can not see the other side , you only need 6 feet. If you leave them out, the deer will eventually eat the buds. With snow ...


2

If you are concerned about deer nibbling the new growth on your branches, then your best bet would be to build a deer fence. There are various designs, ranging from very tall ( >8 ft ) woven wire ones, to nicer looking short electric fences that deter the deer from coming near. http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/deer/deer-eating-fruit-trees....


2

Black plastic mesh deer netting, and don't skimp on height. The fencing is pretty affordable and visually minimal, but effective. Indeed, part of its effectiveness is that they think they can run through it, and bounce off it instead (it's strong - use good posts.)


2

Talk your Barber into allowing you to collect hair trimmings - bag up in small cloth bags or sprinkle loose hairs, moderately thickly, throughout the nursery. Another choice, provide whatever else in your area is in their hierarchy of food ie #1) baled clover, #2) baled or collected hardwood twigs, etc (very localized). Place it in an area close to forest ...


2

If you want a plant that bees don't bother to visit, buy something that has double flowers - these are often sterile and don't produce pollen, so they're no use to bees. As for deer resistant, that's another matter altogether; Trumpet Vine and Wisteria are not terribly attractive to deer, but they are both attractive to bees. Finding something that ...


2

Deer take serious fencing. So, fence seriously, further from the plants, and use deer netting which they cannot stick their heads through (they can fit their entire bodies through spaces you'd not think they could, and they can jump more than 6 feet.) Otherwise, expect another year of growing plants to feed deer with.


2

I've seen arb lollipops that looked like something out of Dr. Seuss - a mop-head on a stick. They'll live with 75% of the leaves and branches eaten, but they won't like it and they will grow extremely slowly or not at all. I think they're embarrassed that they look so stupid. I'd plant columnar juniper instead (white-tailed deer will eat juniper, but only if ...


1

This maybe isn't the best solution and certainly not fool proof, but could be effective when combined with another option, such as the fencing. I've heard of numerous products and tricks to repel deer from desirable plants. I'll list a few cheap, readily available options here. Human hair - It's been said that the scent of human hair can be enough to repel ...


1

This solution may or may not be available to you but works very well. If you can, get yourself a dog. I would suggjest you get yourself a dog which is very trainable and is... well... rather loud. Personally, I like the idea of a hound. From what I understand it is rather easy to train a hound to chase off dear and other wildlife and their natural propensity ...


1

No personal experience but deer eat everything, they eat my azaleas


1

I have three solutions: thick plants that physically keep out deer. Thorny plants (maybe a climbing rose) Enclosure (possibly with wood) or wire mesh (this could be small and enclose also a single plant). And possibly keep some ground for them, so that they will stop where you care less.


1

Based on a few sources I've found, it looks like Tick tubes aren't really intended to keep total tick populations down, but rather to keep the number of Lyme disease carrying ticks down. At Larval stages, deer ticks feed on small mammals, like rabbits, mice etc. At adult stage, they go for larger mammals like deer and sometimes humans. The reservoir species ...


1

You can cut Arborvitae back to a growing green shoot. Any further, and the foliage will not grow back. Arborvitae should be pruned back in early spring, not late fall. One thing that might discourage the deer-and I have seen this work if heavy deer country-is to lay wrinkled chicken wire flat on the ground around the area you are trying to protect. The ...


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