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18

This is called Marcescence. Some species of trees retain their old leaves longer than others, and young trees may retain them longer than old trees. In the UK, "copper beech" trees (with naturally brown or purple coloured leaves even in summer) which are sometimes used for ornamental hedges often retain the old leaves right through the winter. It may be a ...


9

In the UK, where I live, none of this is necessary, so I've just been researching this subject. It seems that what you are doing, all parts of the procedure, are essential if you want your roses to survive undamaged through such hard winter weather. Primarily, mounding up is to protect the graft union, because if that gets damaged, the graft will fail; the ...


7

I think that might be a branch from a Juniperus species, a female, and those are the berries or 'seed pods', example here: Juniper berries (Wikimedia). Some Junipers have white berries, many have berries which start out white and change through to bluish black, so if your plant has many of these, that's all they are, and certainly nothing to worry about.


6

Two traditional methods which work but may not agree with you are: 1) tar the surface. I believe you could get a local construction company to do this as spraying hot tar may not be a chore you want to do 2) If your driveway is already compacted and drains well this is my preferred solution: Crusher run or Crushed stone: this is generally limestone or ...


6

In general, no mulch should be piled up against a woody trunk or woody stem. If you're using straw for insulation purposes because winter is coming, just leave a little clear space, an inch or two all round, the trunk, but if you're covering up herbaceous perennial plants which disappear below ground in winter, you don't need to worry, you can just heap it ...


6

Will the pepper grow back? Not exactly. However, after you harvest the pepper the plant likely will produce more flowers, which can be pollinated and grow into more peppers.


6

They look as if they were going dormant outside before you brought them in. If they are now in a warm room, quite likely they will start to grow again too early and end up etiolated because of the low light level inside the house over winter. Keeping them in normal "living room" temperatures is not a good idea. They really need several weeks below 50F (10C) ...


5

They are cones - in some conifer genera (Juniperus) the scales are fused to form berry like structures. These look to me to be more like immature Cupressus cones - eventually they will turn brown and scales split (this may take some time and in some species requires fire!). Whilst the foliage could be the mature foliage that develops on some Juniperus ...


5

No, it will not grow back. The pepper is the result of a pollinated flower, as is a peach, an apple, a tomato, etc. However, save some of the seeds inside the pepper and you can plant them to have a new plant that will flower and will produce more bell peppers once they are pollinated by your local flying insect helper (e.g., a bee). Since you have a ...


5

The tree is probably dead, as @Bamboo has pointed out in a comment. The reason for this conclusion is that the leaves are dull, dry, and curled. In normal growth the leaf expands, does its job of keeping metabolism going and at the end of the growing period forms an abscission layer at the base of the leaf stalk. This allows the leaf to fall leaving a sealed ...


4

Choose your garlic patch and plant it now. Mulch that. Straw is ideal if you have it, shredded leaves are OK, whole leaves mat down a bit too much, and also blow around too much before they mat down. If you have carrots, kale, or other crops that do well in the cold, leave them be - mulch and mark the carrots so you can dig them as you need them through the ...


4

I found a product called Stone Man Stay Put. The manufacturer is Ivy League Landscape LLC. Found it at Ace but I'm sure Home Depot has it too. Simple water like mixture. Put it in your sprayer and apply a thin coating. You literally cannot tell there is anything holding the stones together, but they do not move. It's been two years and I have not had to rake ...


4

I'll guess that the ferns have gone dormant for the winter, as many do, and that they will return when the weather warms up. This is normal, and nothing to worry about.


4

Timing's important, it's not clear how long ago the sod was put down, but as your weather is now turning wintry, it would not be a great idea to water it. In any case, if the landscaping company actually did water it for two weeks after laying, if that was, say, only a month ago, then hopefully it shouldn't be a problem. If they laid it a longer time ago, ...


4

Indoor plants, plants in green houses get confused big time come winters. Some plants (not the ones you have) actually NEED to go dormant for their health. Indoors during the winter is tough because the heating sucks the moisture out of the air, the plants relying on light from windows are getting 'told' climate has changed because of the hours of daylight ...


4

Because your lawn is not established, try to bag all cuttings from the lawn. Here are some herbicides safe for use on Centipede grass. Only use these chemicals when the temperatures are between 60 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Also be sure the soil is moist, or control will be poor. Do now mow until after the day following application. (I am not sure how many ...


3

Looks very professional, especially since you say you are a first-time gardener. If you don't expect anymore harvest (no flowers, no fruits anymore), you can get rid of the plants. They are indeed suitable for composting, if you know anyone that wants it for their compost, it will be a good source of 'greens'. You can also let the plants die, after the ...


3

Ragnarsson, that is a very sweet picture. Aren't rabbits cute? I wouldn't blame you if you opted to feed them in the winter and turn over your garden produce to them in the summer. As alephzero points out, that is the choice you are faced with. As you yourself note, they are wild, so they have been taking care of themselves up until now. Cute as they are, I ...


3

Japanese elm is a deciduous tree and, as such, it expects to lose its leaves and become dormant during winter. It is an outdoor bonsai, but may be susceptible to frost damage when the weather is very cold because of its shallow root system and container, so is best moved to a cold greenhouse or somewhere that isn't warm, but frost free. It's not good to ...


3

Prune back old, dead, or suspect branches older than 3 years. Doing so now is fine. Don't prune last years growth except where it's really in the way or causing another problem at this time. You risk loosing that branch. Don't prune climbers in the Spring, but wait until after blooming next year. Unfortunately, there are really hardy climbers and not-so-...


3

Because paint has the possible effect of interfering with gas exchanges through the bark, I wouldn't recommend doing it until the bark breaks, and roughens with age. I wouldn't expect much trouble though. You could also use trunk wraps. I would spray the oil on first, so that it will affect the fungus that will otherwise be covered by paint. If you wait ...


3

Try using a gravel stabiliser! I used one on my driveway, which was also on a slope. The one I used was called COREgravel Coredrive, and it has really helped. It's from the UK, but you can probably find something similar wherever you live. I saw another forum which said these grids must have a weed membrane already attached, so when I was hunting for a ...


2

Avocadoes prefer lots of sunlight and do not like to have wet soil. They do not do well in the dry indoors environment of the winter months here in the western hemisphere, but they do survive. Yours looks like it is dropping leaves perhaps because of the low light levels or the coolness of the room? In my experience, keeping them as close as possible to a ...


2

If you actually have climbing roses (as opposed to rambling roses, which are pruned in September) then you will need to prune them in spring. Roses usually lose their leaves in winter, and some stem or tip dieback almost always occurs during winter, which is why you leave the main prune till spring. Where you are, not all roses will do very well because its ...


2

There are two different types of "climbing rose." In the UK they are usually known as climbing roses and rambling roses, but I don't know if the US uses those descriptions. You need to find out which type you have, before you prune it. Rambling roses grow new stems from the base, so you prune them by completely removing stems that are getting old, or are ...


2

I'd be cautious. Very cute! However, depending on where you live increased prey may attract predators. I've got coyotes in my area (in the suburbs) and I've seen varying numbers of rabbits hopping around during the year. Rabbits I'm sure will do just fine during the winter as they can forage the existing plants under the snow. One great thing with winter ...


2

Quite a few, but some may not like the damper, cooler weather during January/February and may stop flowering at that time. Look for Oleander, Pelargoniums, Bougainvillaea, Russelia equisetiformis, Hibiscus, Lonicera, and roses, though these last will do better if you can find somewhere to plant them that doesn't get full sun during high summer when it's ...


2

"However, I feel like the direct sunlight would lead the to cover crops decomposing more quickly because of photodegradation? Am I totally wrong about that?"- fnwovnwownf Well no, you aren't totally wrong about that. However, the microbial and macro decomposers are going to be far more effective. Decomposers like the mulch; it keeps the sun and the eyes of ...


1

My own experience is that planting the hardwoods now will work, even if the soil freezes soon afterwords. This is one time when planting a potted plant, though, that I would NOT try to break the root ball a bit to encourage rooting into the soil. You have three major concerns, though: Current location - Where are the potted trees stored right now? A semi-...


1

I think you should find some cover place to store it (and your gardening tools). This "hut" do not need to have walls on all sides, but it need to be covered (roof) to protect from rain/snow. As you wrote, a plastic will create too much condensation, and so it will ruin the engines and other electric parts. This is less problematic than gasoline engines: ...


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