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7

Nothing to do with phosphorus levels - the usual explanation is varying exposure. One plant may shield another from the full effects, one might be further into a frost pocket and is thus more exposed than the one next to it, some plants are in a warmer spot to start with (more sun exposure, so the soil is warmer for longer, meaning frost has slightly less ...


7

The yew bushes in front of the building I work at are flattened by snow and ice every winter, (nobody cleans it off, and if the roof gets cleared, they get extra helpings on top.) They are poorly shaped for snow (trimmed dead flat on top). When the snow melts they are fine (and have been for 20+ years of this.) Therefore, my suggestion is: do nothing, ...


6

First, a word on how USDA Hardiness Zones are determined. USDA Hardiness Zones are based on the Average Annual Extreme Minimum Temperature. So, the average of the coldest temperature on the coldest night, that's where we're looking at. If you're thinking that's around -3.5 to -5 C that likely puts you in Zone 9a according to this map The shelter is adequate ...


6

Adding to @Ecnerwal excellent answer - Draped row covers will provide a little additional support by trapping in more heat - maybe 1-3 degrees c - the key would be to take them off during the day to help heat the soil beneath them. If you look at what hardiness zones plants can be grown in and when you can plant them, that should give you an indication as ...


6

Plants grown warm, indoors, will need hardening off to transition to an outdoor greenhouse that's unheated. One aspect you may not have considered with a "simple greenhouse" is cooking the plants on a bright, sunny day - an unventilated greenhouse can become a solar oven. There are unpowered wax-based automatic vents, or else you need a person on the job ...


6

First, your comment that its still snowing - don't even think about cutting back the gardenias until you are more or less certain that winter, and its cold temperatures, has passed, so don't do it now. You need to wait till spring starts properly, whenever that will be, without the risk of sudden cold snaps recurring. When you've got to that point, check ...


6

Nothing is generating heat on or within the fruit - the paper bag acts as an insulator so that if/when the temperature drops (possibly overnight or whatever) the fruit is more protected than it would otherwise be if it were not bagged. Paper is a very good insulator, sealed at the top or not, and in this case, there's a gap between the fruit and the bag ...


5

Although it won't hurt the yew for the branches to lay down thusly, indeed this is how many confers grow naturally anyway is to spread out after grow up first. They may not lift back up. The hole will fill after a few years but you may not want to wait. After the thaw, wrap the yews with twine and lift the branches back to where you want them and let the ...


5

They should be fine as long as it doesn't actually freeze. I grow them in Montana and they are very susceptible to frost, but only if it actually frosts. If the peppers are touched by frost, they get soft and mushy.


4

These yews are going to be fine. Cut any broken branches back to a healthy main stem. Lop off ends to relieve weight. Not a great idea to use twine at this stage as that would act like a cast on one's arm, atrophying and weakening the branch. When pruning for a hedge, I am assuming this is what you are trying to accomplish, keep the top narrower than the ...


4

Edible Tree Crop Farm was Dick Robert's pioneering permaculture site in Nelson, NZ before the term existed. A sub tropical climate was created with the use of North (equatorial) facing hillsides, ponds for thermal mass and heat reflection, wind breaks to divert cold winds, rocks etc. A description of micro climates can also be found here. https://...


4

Trees vary widely in leaf-out time, oaks are a long-lived species that plays it very safe in order to not die out due to a warm spell. Factors influencing leaf-out include: Warm, sunny location, such as a south-facing hill (will leaf-out earlier) Cold, shady location (will leaf-out later) White Oak is among the last species to leaf out. Oak needs a ...


4

As a resource you can consider Eliot Coleman's The Winter Harvest Handbook: Year Round Vegetable Production Using Deep-Organic Techniques and Unheated Greenhouses which discusses growing in unheated greenhouses, and the use of floating row covers to provide extra protection against sub zero temperatures. This was a method pioneered by Prof Emmert in the ...


4

Had they sprouted yet? If they were still in the soil, they are probably fine (for frost, not freeze.) If they had sprouted (to the point of being above soil), you'll probably see the tops die and should replant.


4

It's a complicated subject, and to some extent, depends where you are and what sort of grass you're growing. In the UK, I might cut grass in early January, if it looks like it needs it - but only if the weather is temporarily mild, or at least above 5 deg C during the day - if a frost forms that night, so long as the temperature doesn't fall below -2deg C, ...


4

You don't say what part of the world you're in, but this is more of a problem than it once was in many parts of the northern hemisphere, and there is little you can do about it. It's because of climate change - temperatures fluctuate in parts of the northern hemisphere quite naturally during winter, but that fluctation is now greater and less predictable ...


4

I live in Wisconsin, where we also plant when the temps can get below freezing, and I think that you're right to be concerned - 9 F is awfully cold for your plants—according to this sustainable farming site, it's just below the lowest temperature spring peas can stand without being killed. Assuming that you have a typical garden-sized row or rows of peas, ...


3

Sunflower plants are not frost tolerant, but the seedlings are, they will tolerate down to -3deg C at the cotyledon stage for a brief period; that is why the suggestion to sow 2 weeks before the last frost date is made, because it's unlikely the seedlings will be any size at all if there is a frost and will therefore survive. But once they become small or ...


3

If you're asking whether the soil in your potted trees is better being damp when you know cold weather is coming, yes, it is, so watering if necessary, preferably in the morning to give the plants time to take up the water, is a good idea. Frost damage can still occur on newly opened, young leaves, but frost and freezing are not always the same thing - there ...


3

Grass is not normally sensitive to frost and is not burned by the sun due to frost crystals. That is because when temperatures are low the plant goes dormant. More information is found here where the only issue seems to be a sensitivity to herbicides. This turf supplier in Australia notes that is cold tolerant down to -10 Deg C in Canberra. As long as ...


3

I have gardened for years,too many to count. The most success I have had has been to keep the greenhouse area above 10 celcius at night, water your plants so they do not take up all the moisture when sweating. That's what causes them to freeze.keep them off the ground as it is colder there.I run a fan during the day so they get used to a breeze and makes ...


3

When your grass crop looks frost covered, do not step on it. You will easily kill the crowns of some of the grass species. I've seen the footsteps of dead grasses where an owner walked out on his lawn when there was frost. Even just freezing temperatures during the early morning hours could freeze the crowns of your grass without 'frost' appearing on the ...


2

For the more rugged grape varieties, keep them pot-to-pot and well-drained. You should mulch them both above the soil and around and between the pots. Do not fertilize. Check the soil moisture and water if required. Don't introduce electric or other heat to the plants. This can curtail dormancy and trigger premature growth, which will stress the plants. If ...


2

In addition to finding this question when looking into this, I came across an article from the University of Illinois Extension, which had some relevant information: Probably the concern over eating produce after a freeze goes back to one plant – rhubarb. [...] We eat the rhubarb stalks and should never eat the large leaves any time of year. The leaves are ...


2

I've developed www.ifweather.com for managing custom weather alerts and sending email just like you describe. It isn't free, but it's the best option for managing many alerts for more than one location that I've found. It currently has the ability to watch the forecast for temperature and precipitation conditions. When the conditions you specify are ...


2

If they get hit by frost, they will go dark, translucent, and mushy. In a while they will dry off and shrivel. If alive, they will remain rigid, and slowly increase in size as they grow. If you can magnify them and get a better look, that would help. If you're still in question, wait a week and note any differences. If they haven't shriveled atall, they're ...


2

I don't know what frost is like in Australia, sadly...but here it is a big deal for lawn grasses. The deal is to NOT WALK ON YOUR FROSTED LAWN. This breaks the blades and crowns and if your grass is frozen enough will kill the grass you walk upon. You'll actually be able to see your footprints in the spring. Just stay off your grass when the lawn is ...


2

Watered believe it or not. The best solution is to WATER with an oscillating sprinkler BEFORE morning. Watering like this actually slows the already frozen cells in thawing. Fast thaw is what kills most plants or plant material subjected to a freeze or frost. Watering slows the thawing down. Healthy plants will be able to recover. So yes, water them. ...


2

I'm sorry to say they will not germinate, regardless of last night's grass frost or not. Tagetes or French marigold (which is the type of marigold you've described with those varietal names) are half hardy annuals in the UK and need to be sown into seed and cutting compost, in trays, in temperatures of 21-25 deg C, see link here http://www.thompson-morgan....


2

I would recommend using heating cables, although they cost more than lights. There are heating cables designed just for use in soil, so they'd be weather resistant. You can set them up with a thermostat to control the temperature. You don't need to keep plants at room temperature for frost protection obviously, so I'd set it pretty low. You could wrap the ...


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