Hot answers tagged

12

I use my hose all winter as part of maintaining a backyard rink. We use brass fittings and they don't leak. Now, we don't leave the hose outside with water in it, and I don't think you should either. (At the risk of being overly clear I mean the habit of turning off the hose at the nozzle (the business end), then walking back to the tap and turning off the ...


12

A raw root vegetable can sit at room temperature or slightly cooler for weeks and months without bacterial growth that will harm you. The same is not true of meat, cooked vegetables, and other things you're likely to have in your freezer. That's where the "don't refreeze" advice comes from - the food may have started to spoil, and you should therefore cook ...


10

Unless they have passed the stage of bud swelling, they should be okay at 12F (as discussed by Clemson and NCSU extension). Methods used to actively protect a tree from low temperatures work best under calm clear conditions. Under these conditions, an inversion layer occurs - this is a relatively stable cold air mass at the surface with warmer air above. ...


10

Olive trees prefer hot weather, but may stay outdoors as long as the temperature doesn't dip below 14F. I plan on getting an Arbequina olive tree and I know those are fairly frost resistant.


10

I think the advice to not re-freeze anything has more to do with the structure of the produce being broken down by the ice crystals (the cell walls burst from the pressure or the ice crystals cut through) and you end up with a "mushy" (highly technical term) vegetable. This can also lead to freezer burn (parts of the vegetable dehydrated due to water loss). ...


9

Yes, most olive trees are frost resistant, but do not like it to get too low. Usually the most cold-tolerant varieties can take temperatures of down to 15-20 degrees Fahrenheit. If it gets colder than that in your area, or stays cold for extended periods, try moving it indoors to a sunny window during the worst parts. But once it's used to indoor ...


7

Nothing to do with phosphorus levels - the usual explanation is varying exposure. One plant may shield another from the full effects, one might be further into a frost pocket and is thus more exposed than the one next to it, some plants are in a warmer spot to start with (more sun exposure, so the soil is warmer for longer, meaning frost has slightly less ...


7

The yew bushes in front of the building I work at are flattened by snow and ice every winter, (nobody cleans it off, and if the roof gets cleared, they get extra helpings on top.) They are poorly shaped for snow (trimmed dead flat on top). When the snow melts they are fine (and have been for 20+ years of this.) Therefore, my suggestion is: do nothing, ...


7

I think I've found a winner! "If this then that" is a website that lets you specify an action to take based on some trigger event. They have weather triggers available, and email/SMS actions. Here's my ifttt recipe for email frost alerts. I just barely set it up, so I don't yet know how reliable it will be. SMS is left as an exercise to the reader...


6

I think the spraying thing is not after, it's during. The cold will freeze the mist, keeping the air around the trees at (but not below) freezing. See http://www.ehow.com/how_5805520_use-freeze-damage-fruit-trees.html for example which recommends a sprinkler. The "releases heat" thing is kind of an oversimplification, but basically as long as you have any ...


6

I have an olive barrel/reservoir/water feature that is completely buried underground. The pump is at the bottom of the barrel which is approximately 4 feet underground. I drain the reservoir in the autumn. It is full of water every spring. So far, in our zone 5 location, where temperatures of -30 deg C are not uncommon the barrel and pump have come ...


6

First, a word on how USDA Hardiness Zones are determined. USDA Hardiness Zones are based on the Average Annual Extreme Minimum Temperature. So, the average of the coldest temperature on the coldest night, that's where we're looking at. If you're thinking that's around -3.5 to -5 C that likely puts you in Zone 9a according to this map The shelter is adequate ...


6

First, your comment that its still snowing - don't even think about cutting back the gardenias until you are more or less certain that winter, and its cold temperatures, has passed, so don't do it now. You need to wait till spring starts properly, whenever that will be, without the risk of sudden cold snaps recurring. When you've got to that point, check ...


6

Nothing is generating heat on or within the fruit - the paper bag acts as an insulator so that if/when the temperature drops (possibly overnight or whatever) the fruit is more protected than it would otherwise be if it were not bagged. Paper is a very good insulator, sealed at the top or not, and in this case, there's a gap between the fruit and the bag ...


5

Although it won't hurt the yew for the branches to lay down thusly, indeed this is how many confers grow naturally anyway is to spread out after grow up first. They may not lift back up. The hole will fill after a few years but you may not want to wait. After the thaw, wrap the yews with twine and lift the branches back to where you want them and let the ...


5

I could not find a service so I have made one, http://frostalertemail.com (UK only).


5

Tomatoes are on their own roots. If they are sprouting new leaves and branches they will be fine. Just work on making sure they don't freeze again. This is true of virtually all herbacious plants btw. For woody plants if they are on their own roots, again you are usually ok but if they are grafted the leaves and branches are from the rootstock rather ...


5

I had the same problem and couldn't find a solution..so I developed ColdSnap! for Android..costs less than a packet of seeds (and now does high temperature warnings too).


5

They should be fine as long as it doesn't actually freeze. I grow them in Montana and they are very susceptible to frost, but only if it actually frosts. If the peppers are touched by frost, they get soft and mushy.


4

Yes, it's safe. Spoilage in vegetables that have had "too much" frost is obvious -- e.g. spinach leaves will be discolored or mushy. Classic advice is to let parsnips overwinter, so that the cold weather makes the plant convert starches to sugars. This works with carrots too, though if they experience too many freeze/thaw cycles, they'll turn to mush (in ...


4

My initial thought was to cover them with tarps if they aren't too big. I like the suggestion in the question you linked to about placing heaters under the tree as well. A quick search found this site about protecting orange trees. It suggests keeping the ground near the tree wet and wrapping the trunk with cardboard or cloth. This site has a fantastic ...


4

Edible Tree Crop Farm was Dick Robert's pioneering permaculture site in Nelson, NZ before the term existed. A sub tropical climate was created with the use of North (equatorial) facing hillsides, ponds for thermal mass and heat reflection, wind breaks to divert cold winds, rocks etc. A description of micro climates can also be found here. https://...


4

These yews are going to be fine. Cut any broken branches back to a healthy main stem. Lop off ends to relieve weight. Not a great idea to use twine at this stage as that would act like a cast on one's arm, atrophying and weakening the branch. When pruning for a hedge, I am assuming this is what you are trying to accomplish, keep the top narrower than the ...


4

Plants grown warm, indoors, will need hardening off to transition to an outdoor greenhouse that's unheated. One aspect you may not have considered with a "simple greenhouse" is cooking the plants on a bright, sunny day - an unventilated greenhouse can become a solar oven. There are unpowered wax-based automatic vents, or else you need a person on the job ...


4

Adding to @Ecnerwal excellent answer - Draped row covers will provide a little additional support by trapping in more heat - maybe 1-3 degrees c - the key would be to take them off during the day to help heat the soil beneath them. If you look at what hardiness zones plants can be grown in and when you can plant them, that should give you an indication as ...


4

Trees vary widely in leaf-out time, oaks are a long-lived species that plays it very safe in order to not die out due to a warm spell. Factors influencing leaf-out include: Warm, sunny location, such as a south-facing hill (will leaf-out earlier) Cold, shady location (will leaf-out later) White Oak is among the last species to leaf out. Oak needs a ...


4

Had they sprouted yet? If they were still in the soil, they are probably fine (for frost, not freeze.) If they had sprouted (to the point of being above soil), you'll probably see the tops die and should replant.


4

It's a complicated subject, and to some extent, depends where you are and what sort of grass you're growing. In the UK, I might cut grass in early January, if it looks like it needs it - but only if the weather is temporarily mild, or at least above 5 deg C during the day - if a frost forms that night, so long as the temperature doesn't fall below -2deg C, ...


4

You don't say what part of the world you're in, but this is more of a problem than it once was in many parts of the northern hemisphere, and there is little you can do about it. It's because of climate change - temperatures fluctuate in parts of the northern hemisphere quite naturally during winter, but that fluctation is now greater and less predictable ...


3

Now we come back to your other question, which mint have you got. All mint varieties commonly available are hardy in your USDA zone, except one, which is Mentha x piperita vulgaris, common name Black Stem Peppermint, which is hardy from Zone 6 upwards. This one has almost purple stems with dark green, oval leaves which have a small, toothed margin. If you ...


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