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7

You should really wait till late winter (in pots if its not warm enough outdoors) or spring time to plant, but assuming it's ginger root you're after, then yes, you can buy it from the grocery store - select pieces which look plump, with as many 'eyes' as you can find. Soak them overnight, then either cut them up, making sure there's an eye in each piece (...


5

I grow three different "gingers" - white (Hedychium coronarium), kahili (Hedychium gardnerianum), and blue (Dichorisandra thyrsiflora) (though that one has yet to flower so I can't say for sure that it's what it claims to be, and it's "not really a ginger" anyway.) You may be under-watering - it's somewhat hard to diagnose over the internet, but both ...


4

Hmm, well, your ginger should have been harvested a few months back, as the leaves died down - at the time when you harvest the root, you can keep a section which has incipient buds or eyes for replanting to grow the following year. Frankly, I don't know what will happen if you dig it up, cut some of the root off, then replant, depends what you find when you ...


4

Looks healthy to me! I don't think a support is necessary. If a cane grows too long for the pot, you can trim it (cut off the last 1/3 of that cane). Make sure they get as much light as possible, to avoid etiolation. You don't need to add compost to a potted plant, but you can fertilize, if you can provide bright light as well. The reason some of them are ...


3

I need to establish some clarity regarding your question - first, when you say ginger grass, do you mean Paspalum distichum, common name ginger grass, or do you mean Zingiber officinale, the knobbly root grown for culinary/medicinal use, which also produces grass like leaves on top? I'm assuming you mean the latter, in which case, this plant grows in Zones ...


2

In addition (kinda hard to see with that picture) old stalks die, new ones grow (one of mine is over 21 years now, though it was 16 before it flowered as it was not getting enough light (based on it flowering immediately after getting moved to a brighter location, and what the offspring do.) So some death/browning is perfectly normal. Depending on size of ...


2

Usual cause is either a light problem or insufficient organic matter in the soil. Regarding sunlight, they don't like it - what they want is diffuse or dappled bright light for a minimum of 5 hours a day, so if yours have been getting a lot of sun, that would explain the way they look. On the other hand, a totally shady spot isn't any good either - they do ...


2

Many of mine looked like that. Though some were a lot smaller, and I suspect these tiny ones are the ones you miss that let the patch grow again. On the other hand I did a second look a few days after removing all the sunchokes I could find, and still found several large ones! I think it must be common.


2

You haven't said which ginger this is - assuming its the type of ginger where the root is used for cooking, that plant does not like direct sunlight, though it appreciates dappled sun. Your plant looks a bit etiolated, so it's not been receiving sufficient bright daylight - the stems look a little weak, but lack of air movement could be contributing to that. ...


2

Since ginger forms rhizomes, I'd simply get a large sharp knife (one you don't mind being used like this) and cut through the branched rhizomes. Leave the large pieces with the new shoots in the soil mix and remove (harvest) the rest. The fibrous roots attached to the rhizomes with shoots will provide for the shoots and as the shoots open to leaves, they'll ...


1

Ginger needs a a big pot; it really wants to spread out. When I grew ginger that I brought from Asia in Belgium, I used really big pots in the living room in a half sunny spot in winter and planted it out in May, to dig it up in September. Only during these months it really made a lot of progress, the potted version grew mainly leaves. I will take the other ...


1

the PH of your water must be slightly acid otherwise nutrients cannot be absorbed by the roots coupled by lack of water id say use a liquid fertilizer (not miracle grow) something with a nutrient content of 5-5-5. thats 5 nitrogen 5 phosphorus and 5 potassium all essential for proper ginger growth


1

I asked about direct, full sunlight because some gingers do not like those conditions - yours look not unlike mine were when I tried growing them on my south facing balcony (full sun). They like sun, but prefer it to be dappled (as in shaded by the leaves of larger plants) - I could not provide these conditions and so I gave up with them. When they're ...


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