28

Most potatoes, as far as I know, have the ability to flower and set fruit. The fruits, known as berries, are small green globes reminiscent of tomatoes, which makes sense seeing as how they're in the same family. It's very important to note that these fruits are somewhat poisonous, though! The seeds in the berries are viable and can, indeed, be planted for a ...


15

First, if the potatoes are big, you should cut them into smaller pieces so that you have one or two eyes (the bit that's sprouting) on each piece. Leave the cut pieces out for a day or so to allow the cut surface to dry out a little. This will help to prevent the potatoes from rotting in the ground. While you're waiting, dig a trench about 12" (30cm) deep ...


13

The tubers that are used for "seed potatoes" are grown and harvested exactly the same way as other potatoes, except for one thing. Like other members of the same plant family (e.g. tomatoes), potatoes are are easily infected with virus diseases. Some of these (like "potato blight") are serious and may cause the entire crop to fail. Others ...


10

Potato tubers turn green as a response to sun exposure to help protect themselves from being eaten so they can reproduce. Plant it and it will proceed naturally to do what was intended, grow a new plant and shrivel up as it delivers the stored energy to it. Keep the ground mulched under the plant so no new tubers are exposed to the sun and all the new ...


9

They should all be 3 feet from one another, the tomato plants and the potatoes. Its not to prevent blight, but to prevent disturbing the roots of the tomatoes if you dig up some potatoes nearby, and to prevent blossom end rot caused by insufficient water/calcium availability for the tomatoes. The greater distance also makes it less likely that any plant will ...


8

My potato bag is one square foot in diameter, and just under 2 foot high. You have 16 square feet in your bed so you could potentially plant one seed potato ( or part of one with at least 3 eyes ) per square foot. One foot deep is about the minimum you can go. Assuming you have good drainage, and you're using a well fertilized soil, you can plant each ...


8

Staring with the basics, potatoes will take about 12 weeks from planting to cropping, and the plants will be killed by the first frost. (The actual potatoes will be fine since they are underground, but the plant's leaves won't survive). I don't know what the climate is like where you live, but midsummer is probably about the latest time you can usefully ...


8

Judging by the state of the plants when you dug them up, and what the soil surface looks like there are no nutrients whatever in it. The potatoes tried to grow, using the material stored in the tuber, but that's as much as they managed to do. The leaves never developed properly, nor did the roots. They would have grown just as "well" if you had just put ...


7

Looking at the measurements of your garden bed, it sounds like square foot gardening. And yes, potatoes are included in that method, one seed per square, so sixteen for your bed. One issue with potatoes is depth: For a good harvest the emerging sprouts are covered with soil to encourage more root mass and more tubers. In "standard" gardening, this is ...


7

It's harder to control blight when the two are planted in close proximity. Late blight caused a devastating epidemic in the 1840s in the North Eastern USA. http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/factsheets/Potato_LateBlt.htm But there are plants that have cherry tomatoes grafted onto potato stock eg. http://www.edible.co.nz/fruits.php?fruitid=77 which ...


7

However, the summer here has been very hot This might very well be the reason. Potatoes tend to stop the production of tubers once the soil reaches a certain temperature. Gardeners that plant their potatoes in dark plastic bags and unwittingly put the bags into a sunny spot often have the same problem. Next year, plant your potatoes as early as possible to ...


6

Some potatoes are harder than others. The Andean people of South America had many different names for potatoes. Red potatoes were called “weep blood for the Inca” and hard potatoes were called “knife breaker.” http://academics.hamilton.edu/foodforthought/Our_Research_files/potatoes.pdf The proper way to grow potatoes is in a high potassium soil with ph ...


6

It will grow from wherever it has the means to sprout, as with potatoes. It is also almost impossible to eradicate once you establish a bed, so pick your location carefully, thinking about the long term.


6

Carrots are shade tolerant so I wouldn't remove the potato leaves. Any leaf reduction will reduce the amount of carbohydrates being stored in the tubers. If they're early season potatoes, you may well have harvested them all before the carrots are mature.


6

Sorry, neither is a potato plant. A potato sprout is medium to dark green (sometimes with reddish undertones just when breaking through), looks like a little whirl of wrinkly, thick leaves, then unfolds to the typical compound leaf. (click to enlarge) The first plant in your post is probably a wood sorrel or oxalis, the second a clover. Without flowers ...


6

Seed potatoes by the time you get them from your supplier have a chronological age and a physiological age. Depending on how well it has been kept by the supplier, its physiological age may be older then its chronological age would suggest. Factors that increase physiological age include crop stress ( high temperatures, low moisture, frost damage, disease )...


6

Yes, they will growth again. Potatoes are the winter house of potato plant (Solanum tuberosum). But you will have too many plants. I think in spring, you should harvest them and replant some of them (as the original distance). If you will do this early in spring, you can eventually eat the rest of potatoes, you should check visually that they are still ...


5

Best not to plant straight into pure farmyard manure, they'll do better in decent potting compost, maybe 20% John Innes and multi purpose mixed. You can buy this at the garden centre already mixed up, if not buy both and mix them yourself. I'm saying 20% JI because its loam based and can be heavy once wet, likely too heavy for lighter bags than the one you'...


5

Yes, I have sunchokes. The bigger the "finger", the more stored energy the tuber has, and the bigger the plant will be. I generally plant fingers/tubers that are at least 1 inch in the thickest portion. These are fun plants. I even got them to overwinter in the ground in Michigan zone 5b.


5

When it gets hot and humid tomatoes grow fast, and they can block the light to the potatoes which don't grow so big.


5

In general, try not to mix plants of the same family (and in this case both share Solanum as genus), both for competition on same nutrients (they share similar metabolism), and their can share diseases. Tomato plants don't have deep roots, so I think you can have problem harvesting potatoes without damaging the tomatoes. EDIT: I never had problem with ...


5

The potential problem is due to the fact that potatoes and tomatoes are closely related, both members of the nightshade family, Solanum. This means, they are both susceptible to a few fungal diseases, which can "jump" from one type of plant to the other. Note that there are more members of the solanum family that are less susceptible, but can carry the ...


5

You are somewhat in need of relaxing. The blue potatoes that keep coming up in my garden (despite being harvested, some always seem to escape and grow the next year, for at least 3 years in a row now) were found, rather sad, dried up and moldy (with long, but rather shriveled, sprouts) under a bag of chicken feed, in mid-summer - evidently the person who ...


5

Typically you harvest potatoes once the green stuff has at least started to dry up and wilt, for early types at a "greener" stage, later types when the green tops have completely turned yellow and dried. How long it takes until the potatoes are ready to be harvested depends a lot on the type you planted. Super-early kinds may be ready after as little as 100-...


5

That is actually a pretty straight-forward proposition, regardless of flowering or not. Basically, as long as the stems and leaves are viable, then they are feeding the growth of the tubers. When they die back, there's no reason to wait any longer. Since plants devote energy to reproduction, not having flowers might be a better thing (not sure about this ...


5

I planted a few different varieties this year and I didn't see flowers on at least one variety. About a week ago it seemed like the flowerless plants were just starting to die off (plus I was eager for potatoes) so I dug them up and found a ton of medium to very small, very tasty potatoes. I'm sure if I had left the plants another few weeks or more I would ...


5

You need to either mound the soil up over the bottoms of your plants or you could use straw and a tomato cage. Don't allow your potatoes to see the sun because then the skin of the potato turns photosynthetic and poisonous. Solanaceae, deadly nightshade? Just keep covering the soil and potatoes beneath the foliage. Mounding it higher as the foliage ...


5

There are already good general answers to this question, but I will add a couple of specifics. La Ratte is male and female fertile variety, so it is capable of producing seeds without a pollinator. If there are no other male fertile varieties nearby, the seeds will be self-pollinated. Self-pollinated seeds of La Ratte produce mostly tubers similar to the ...


5

This is known as 'brown center and hollow heart'. It is caused by abrupt changes in growing conditions (think of temperature or watering regime changes). You can still eat them, but you better remove the affected parts first. Unfortunately it makes it not suitable for sale anymore.


4

The best fertilizer for potatoes in the choices listed above is the tomato and vegetable fertilizer. Generally, you should have the most phosphorous, then nitrogen, and the least potassium in the ratio. Potatoes are an underground crop, which means they need lots of phosphorous. In a container, they will require more nitrogen than in the ground, because it ...


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