13

Some things I've noticed about basil: 1) Basil is deep-rooted. I have medium size basil plants in fairly large pots (pots which originally contained 5ft pears trees). The basil roots have grown out of the drain holes and anchored the pots to the ground. Basil roots can easily exceed 1ft of depth. 2) Basil can root from the stem like tomatoes. I ...


10

I live in USDA zone 6b (Southeastern Pennsylvania), and Pawpaws are native growers here. Cold shouldn't be an issue in 6b, but winter length may have some effect. They don't do well in really long winters. As for the conditions. Soil: What I've noticed is that these don't like compacted soil at all. Lawns are not best. Even a mowed meadow can have ...


9

Chives are one of the easiest herbs to grow and are trouble free unless you grow onions close by. The onion fly will attack most members of the onion family of which the chive is a member. What are ideal conditions for germination? Soil less mix, moisture, light, bottom heat, moderate to high humidity to start germination with more air movement after ...


9

Contrary to what you often see, Wasabi can be grown in moist, but not submerged, soil. You'll do best starting with fresh, viable seeds. Here's a few points on preferred conditions in soil growing (this does not all apply to hydroponic growing): Soil should be free draining, highly organic soft soil at least 10 inches deep. The soil should not compact ...


8

Those sound like the kind of temperatures we get here in North Texas (today will probably hit 40C - we have a hot week forecast!). Every summer for the last 10 years I've grown peppers in those conditions. Peppers are adapted to heat stress, so they'll appear to wilt during the day (leaves turn floppy like thin paper) but will perk up with a good watering. ...


8

You can also prune when it freezes, without problems. I do that regularly under snow and have never had a problem. It is also done regularly in my region. Just: don't prune too much early: wait a few weeks until after the last leaves fall, in order to let the starch to reach the roots. if your region could have a strong freeze (less than -15° C, 5° F), ...


7

Basil is a great companion plant. Have a search for 'basil' on this list of companion plants to see what's good to plant nearby.


7

Bacterial leaf spot infection. There is no cure, but you can try to avoid it next season. Here are some tips: Cultural: Clean up and burn/landfill fallen leaves/fruit. Don't compost. Loosen the soil around the base of the plant. Add 1" of rich compost to the soil. Mulch well with an organic mulch to help conserve moisture Water whenever the ground is ...


7

A commercial Ontario grower lists them as hardy to Canadian zone 5 and the USDA site shows it growing as far north as Hudson Bay. It will be hardy in your area and will do best in: moist to wet soils probably best naturalized near water all types of sun exposure but full sun will need adequate access to moisture likely better with protection from wind


7

Plant them as is, do not try to mend the bulbs. At best the bulb just needs some moisture from the surrounding soil. At worst, the bulb simply won't grow. If you are concerned about disease, you can throw the sad looking ones out, but don't bother trying to mend them, you'll do more harm than good.


7

The outer layers are thick, dry and dark brown. Should I peel them away, or is there reason to believe they may be protecting the healthy part of the bulb? Only remove them if they are hanging loose from the bulbs. The ones wrapped around the bulbs are protective and should not be removed. The tops are shriveled, but I can see some green down ...


7

Like many plants, Jade plant stems are comprised of 'nodes and internodes' (the nodes containing the concentrated meristem tissue): The nodes hold one or more leaves, as well as buds which can grow into branches (with leaves, conifer cones, or inflorescences (flowers)). Adventitious roots may also be produced from the nodes. The internodes distance one ...


6

When I grew rhubarb in England, it thrived without any help. Of course, the climate in England is temperate. It doesn't grow very well at all in climates approaching sub-tropical and warmer. Even if there is a noticeable cold season, rhubarb will find it difficult to thrive when summers are hot. The humidity level might be important too. I've attempted ...


6

I grow it in the UK where it thrives. I'd suggest putting it in a shady area under some trees or shrubs. Maybe you could grow it in late winter / spring and autumn as an annual? It needs cold dormancy (induce in late summer by putting the root in a bag and in a freezer). Then in late summer when it is cooling down - plant it and harvest in late autumn / ...


6

It's listed as an annual many places because any amount of frost is likely to be fatal to an unprotected plant. Fortunately, in your zone frost is not really a certainty. If the winter is on the mild side (for your climate) your coleus could probably make it through unprotected. If you make an effort to shelter the plant; coverings, mulching around the ...


6

In carved stone, there shouldn't be any chemicals or toxins. At least, as part of rock, they shouldn't be coming away (people typically carve out of hard rock, so that will diminish wear and tear). There really shouldn't be anything to worry about. As for the surface, rough is helpful. Cracks and poc marks/small holes is even better. Moss is a non-vascular ...


6

Minimum temperature changes among walnut (Juglans regia) varieties (where I live, the walnuts withstand -30 to -40°C / or -22 to -40°F). The maximum temperature is generally around 35°C (95°F) and above this the twigs, leaves and fruits start to burn. Walnuts survive even if the temperature goes occasionally in some days to 45°C (113°F), although I don't ...


5

I grow it very successfully here with summer temperatures to 42 Celsius. We also get sub-zero winters with frosts common. I have mine under bird netting, which believe it or not reduces direct sunlight. I planted mine into a sand mixed with horse manure. I water virtually daily in summer and a lot less in winter. I cannot stop them raging. I am in Australia ...


5

I'm recently retired here in southern Brasil from Manitoba, Canada. I too miss rhubarb crumble, and of course nobody ever has heard of rhubarb here. I brought some seeds from Canada, and started the plants outside in a planter in mid winter (July here). They grew amazingly well! I even managed to savour a rhubarb crumble, then the weather got really hot, and ...


5

Some say vitamin B1 (thiamin) is supposed to help for transplant shock. Thiamin contains sulfur; so, maybe that has something to do with it. If sulfur has anything to do with it, Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) may help. Peppers are supposed to appreciate a certain amount of Epsom salt (diluted a lot, of course). After googling it, I see a recommendation for ...


5

This is from my own experience rather than anything scientific but this seems to work well for me. Any loamy potting soil mix - it must be fairly nutrient rich for best results and you may need to take care not to overwater Very shallow, best to press into the soil gently with a finger and sprinkle a thin layer on top Anything between 5 degrees celsius and ...


5

First, dig down to the subsoil to see what your soil base is. Remove a sample, and spread it out. remove all stones, roots, and debris, and crumble the soil into a fine texture. Fill a quart canning jar (clear) 1/4 full with this soil. Fill it about 3/4 of the way with water, so that there is still some air space. Add 1/2 tbs of dishwasher detergent (don't ...


5

I grow three different "gingers" - white (Hedychium coronarium), kahili (Hedychium gardnerianum), and blue (Dichorisandra thyrsiflora) (though that one has yet to flower so I can't say for sure that it's what it claims to be, and it's "not really a ginger" anyway.) You may be under-watering - it's somewhat hard to diagnose over the internet, but both ...


5

Yes, those are very close. You can still use most of them. First, get their new (cell pots?) containers ready and make sure you have moist mix ready. Moisten it beforehand, rather than after planting, especially if it's bone dry. To remove the seedlings from their flat: Use a plastic knife, popsicle stick, or similar, and starting from one edge, push them ...


5

No those aren't too many. Not nearly too many. I think your plants may not be getting enough light however. Craigh Lehoullier who is known online as nctomatoman has grown and sold heirloom tomatoes for decades using a dense planting method. He is also the author of the book "Epic Tomatoes: How to Select and Grow the Best Varieties of All Time" and was the ...


5

When it comes to growing tomato seedlings, or starting other vegetables indoors from seed the light intensity is more important than the color. Blue light is better for vegetative growth than red light so standard daylight (5000K - 6500k) bulbs work just fine. All the university studies I've read on the subject indicate that they work just as well, sometimes ...


5

By English Lavender, I assume you mean Lavandula augustifolia - it does well in Mediterranean countries, not sure if it has an upper heat tolerance, but will certainly thrive in temperatures up to 45 °C and likely higher. French lavender does well Zones 8-11, and the upper temperature in Zone 11 is around 50 °C. What Lavender doesn't like is heavy, ...


5

No, doesn't need to be in shade - lilac does prefer full sun, but that doesn't mean it won't cope with any shade. It may be getting more sun than you're aware of, but whether you can move it successfully or not is dependent on how long its been there - if you don't know that, then it depends how big it is, and whether its a dwarf variety. If it's been in ...


5

In my opinion, it is not a big deal. Six hours are enough. You can cut some branches of the other tree, and wait the spruce to grow, so it will get more sun. In nature, young tree tend to grow in semi-shadows (most will die or be dormant also for decades in shadows, waiting a old tree to fall). I just expect that it will grow very slow, but (also in my ...


5

Pruning during winter is just fine. Make sure you use alcohol to clean your bypass pruners (avoid anvil types) before, in between different vines and after you have finished. pruning grapevines


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