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13

Definitively a mushroom, a cup fungus of the pezizaceae family. (Precise identification is difficult over the internet.) What you see are the fruiting bodies - not unlike the apples on a tree. The fungus itself lives in the mulch / soil and is saprobiontic, which means it digests the wood chips of your mulch. This is perfectly normal and part of the ...


12

My personal experience is a bit different than what @Bamboo indicates, but I'm not trying to get there by adding kitchen scraps, either. Once upon a time I rented a chipper - it was an overall miserable experience since dis-assembling a pile that was not stacked specifically with chipping in mind is a slow, tedious process, and chippers can be fussy (the ...


12

This sounds like a lot of work. The picture you show of the backyard looks nicer than some other lawns I have seen where people have a maintenance firm do the fertilizing and cutting. Just some points to note: if you raise the grade anything more than an inch or two this will kill any trees inside the raised area. Trees don't take grade changes well. to ...


8

Well they're Yucca - I think they're Yucca flaccida rather than Yucca aloifolia (Spanish Bayonet) because the outermost leaves appear to be flopping outwards rather than remaining upright. Although I can't see any filaments dangling from the edges of the leaves, if there are lots of them, then its Yucca filamentosa. Pic of Yucca flaccida in the link below ...


8

You will want 3-4" diameter perforated pipes in the stone layer (also sloped 1"/10ft), and you will probably also want filter fabric on both sides of the stone layer, or it will become a layer of clay with rocks embedded in it soon enough. You might also want some much deeper "french drains" to deal with the water, rather than only having drainage 1-1.5 ...


8

That is most likely landscaping fabric designed to block or inhibit weed growth. If the soil layer is too thin where you intend to plant perennials, feel free to cut out a circle of the fabric and plant appropriately.


7

I'm not sure what the best way to remove them is but depending on the type of wood chips they could be good to mix with other green material to turn into compost for the flower beds. Using coffee grounds, grass clippings, and other plant material should give you usable compost by next spring. There's a few videos on YouTube showing how to do this.


7

I'll confirm that the identification of Peziza fungus is accurate in Stephie's answer, and it is a saphrophytic fungus, meaning it merely digests dead material, link below (if you scroll down) shows one or two which are more like yours to look at. These are commonly known as cup fungi. Now that it's present, even if you replace your bark chips with new, it's ...


6

Depending on the grass (certainly with kikuyu), it will break through the additional soil very quickly (I made this mistake recently). You might consider spraying the grass with glyphosate [ie the active ingredient in most common weed killers - often called "Roundup" ] first - although this could harm the trees if significant quantities get onto the ...


6

To compost a brush pile in-place you have three problems: Lack of nitrogen. Lack of water. Lack of surface area. One way to solve #1 is to gather lawn clippings or other green matter (leaves, etc) and add them to the brush pile. This will help with #2 as the clippings have water in them, and will act as a sponge to collect and hold rain water. #3 - without ...


6

If its lots of woody stuff, it'll take years to compost down, regardless of any 'greener' additions you may make to the pile to supply nitrogen. Adding kitchen scraps may well increase the risk of unwelcome creatures in the pile as it stands too. If you're not going to use it for hugelkultur, and you want to turn it into useable compost relatively sooner, ...


6

If you have what is basically an untidy woodpile, it will eventually decompose not by composting but by rotting. However unless you have a very "rot-friendly" climate that may take 20 years or more, and in any case the end product will most likely be full of organisms, like honey fungus or so-called "dry rot", that you don't want to spread around the rest of ...


5

Yes, you can indeed till right into the grass and not dig it up. Just understand that there is a good chance that the grass can get tied up like hair in a motor (If that made any sence). Done this many, many times and usually nothing wrong happens. Just simply remove the grass. If anything I would do it because then you just have to rack up the tilled grass :...


5

The best way I know is continuous digging them up where you do not want them to take hold. Pulling baby seedlings when you see them. You will never be able to eradicate them from your yard. This plant would be involved in some statewide eradication effort IF it weren't for the habitat it provides...some bird. Can't remember but the animal is protected. ...


5

If your looking to make sure the grass actually performs well, you should be sure to amend the soil with a decent amount of compost. I'd recommend at least 1 inch, but if it was me and I was making such a large investment in time and money with the other aspects of the project, I would go with 2 or even 3 inches . At 1 inches depth, simply multiply the ...


5

If the grass is dead, no need to remove it. If it's not dead, it may grow. If the yard puddles before mulch, it will puddle under the mulch. So fixing the shape of it for good drainage before mulching would be beneficial, even if "mulch drains well" - you'll have areas of soggy mulch and perhaps mold/fungus otherwise. Layering seems futile if your dogs are ...


5

When scraping up wood chips in the past from stacking wood for the winter I've used a grain/snow shovel to get most of them up by pushing it under the wood chips, then using a leaf rake to gather up what was left behind. If you don't have access to one of those you could always use a shovel that was flat. Put the wood chips in a wheelbarrow, or pickup truck,...


5

Get rid of it! Talk about destroying even a tiny bit of a natural soil system...landscape fabric was made only to put below gravel on top of soil so that the large rocks don't sink and the soil come up causing your rock/gravel to disappear. It is not meant for weed control. Pull it up. In no way does this fabric provide any benefits whatsoever. In fact ...


4

I come at things form an organic landscaping background, so we don't go for pre-emergents, which would prevent it from germinating next year. With that in mind, your goal is to grow the the turf grass thick enough to keep crabgrass from germinating and growing next year. If your soil is bad, you'll want to address that. Have it tested by a reputable lab ...


4

For my part, I would collect a huge amount of mulch and cover the yard with it. You won't need to bend to do the job, just shovel and carts. This will allow lots of wildlife to inhabit below there, and help retain water when it falls. This could represent lots of mulch, depending on the surface you have to cover, though.


4

Have you ever thought of planting some sort of climbing rose or ivy at the base of the pile? This would add beauty and also provide shade to the pile which would speed decomposition.


3

Branches and twigs are terrible for the compost bin. I put them in when I was new to composting and not only does it take a long time to break down but it also gets in the way of turning the pile. I would not recommend using branches and twigs in your compost bin unless you can shred those into very small pieces. I generally just put those in my green bin ...


3

I need to establish some clarity regarding your question - first, when you say ginger grass, do you mean Paspalum distichum, common name ginger grass, or do you mean Zingiber officinale, the knobbly root grown for culinary/medicinal use, which also produces grass like leaves on top? I'm assuming you mean the latter, in which case, this plant grows in Zones ...


3

Sure! the glyphosate will still work. Here's what to look out for, though. Don't walk through any bed you've sprayed roundup (even spot sprayed) until all sprayed surfaces have dried over. Then you're good. Even a little bit on your shoes can cause dead/discolored prints all over your lawn. The easy way to avoid that without taking a break, is, of course, ...


3

In general (until you provide some details/pictures, the best I can do) you can probably improve the situation with drainage tile (aka pipe) (perhaps aided by stone and filter fabric) from your yard area to the low spot behind the fence where water pools, if nothing else - presumably that is lower than your yard if that is where water pools. Slope the pipe ...


3

Sure- when you start stacking seed on seed, so some seeds don't have ground contact, it's clearly too much.


3

I've never found a mulching mower that could grind up the clippings small enough so they would disintegrate by the next week. We mowed hundreds of acres per week, too. And all our clippings had to be dumped in the proper 'clean green' dump that was licensed to handle grass clippings. Do you happen to have curb side garbage service? Ask for the landscape ...


3

If I were your close neighbour I would offer to take all your clippings. I would show up with a trailer, you fill the trailer, and I take them by appointment. You never see them again and my rather large vegetable/flower garden benefits. The clippings would be added to my compost heaps for use as top dressing. So one possibility is that there is a gardener ...


2

Pretty much, your best option is to remove all the layers of rock and landscape fabric, and rebuild from there. If you are willing to hire someone, that will save you a lot of trouble. The soil underneath is likely to be somewhat sterilized and will benefit greatly from the addition of well decomposed compost in a good layer. The more the better. As for ...


2

This is one of my favorite questions. GET RID OF ALL BARK AND PLASTIC period! Do you have a 'greenway'? Some au natural areas? This is the best place to dump the bark, thinly! Plastic does nothing for weeds and stops the entire cycle between atmosphere, rain/water, organics to feed the soil organisms that aerate and help plants uptake certain chemicals (...


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