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11

Step one - if the holes are not particularly large/numerous, ignore them, you don't eat the leaves anyway unless you have a death-wish. Step two - identify the pest - often a quick trip at night with a flashlight is the most effective method - day or might, look under the leaves if you don't see things on top. You can't control or manage an unknown pest ...


10

I watched a video on this precise question because my neighbour invited me to take rhubarb from her plant, and I wanted to make sure I did it in a way that wouldn't affect her plant. The video was made by Tom Cole at Capel Manor College in London. It has been deleted, but these are the points I took from it: Don't cut the stalk with a knife. Pull it right ...


7

Grind isn't the word I would use. More like split. What you want to do is dig up the plant. You dig 6-8 inches deep all the way around, then pry the plant up out of the ground. If the plant is relatively old, this may be difficult as the roots can get very tough and wooden. Once you have the plant uprooted, you split the root mass. You want to have one to ...


6

I agree that dustbins would work well; I have forced rhubarb under buckets, cardboard boxes, and other containers that exclude light. But, in my experience, a cheap, common-size dustbin is best... for excluding light and allowing the maximum space for the rhubarb, as well as costing less than "bespoke" forcing jars. However you choose to force rhubarb, ...


6

When I grew rhubarb in England, it thrived without any help. Of course, the climate in England is temperate. It doesn't grow very well at all in climates approaching sub-tropical and warmer. Even if there is a noticeable cold season, rhubarb will find it difficult to thrive when summers are hot. The humidity level might be important too. I've attempted ...


6

I grow it in the UK where it thrives. I'd suggest putting it in a shady area under some trees or shrubs. Maybe you could grow it in late winter / spring and autumn as an annual? It needs cold dormancy (induce in late summer by putting the root in a bag and in a freezer). Then in late summer when it is cooling down - plant it and harvest in late autumn / ...


5

You should not grind it. It is not like horseradish which you probably could grind up to multiply. Rhubarb you need to let it multiply naturally and divide it after its growing multiple crowns. It's a slow process, but it's the only way to go. You could always buy more crowns.


5

I grow it very successfully here with summer temperatures to 42 Celsius. We also get sub-zero winters with frosts common. I have mine under bird netting, which believe it or not reduces direct sunlight. I planted mine into a sand mixed with horse manure. I water virtually daily in summer and a lot less in winter. I cannot stop them raging. I am in Australia ...


5

I'm recently retired here in southern Brasil from Manitoba, Canada. I too miss rhubarb crumble, and of course nobody ever has heard of rhubarb here. I brought some seeds from Canada, and started the plants outside in a planter in mid winter (July here). They grew amazingly well! I even managed to savour a rhubarb crumble, then the weather got really hot, and ...


4

My sun-room doesn't get enough sunlight for rhubarb. I went to a local nursery that sells rhubarb and the plants were thriving outside in 90F heat. The only difference: they had a very porous soil vs. the clay I had tried growing mine in. I am now successfully growing rhubarb outside in 80-90 degree F heat. The soil MUST be porous. (+ daily watering)


4

Q. Is there a reason your rhubarb is standing in water? Rhubarb prefers even moisture during the growing season (but does require well-drained soil), it most definitely does not like standing in water... If it has been standing in water for a while, I would hazard a guess you're seeing a form of fungi (disease) brought on by crown rot. Rhubarb isn't ...


4

Since you did get the roots, their best chance of survival will be planting them in the ground, and trying to get them as far along as possible by winter. Ideally, spring or fall planting is best. Rhubarb roots do not have extremely large energy reserves, so storing your root until fall may not work well. Here are some good points to note when planting ...


3

I have planted rhubarb in central Michigan in early August. It did great - just water liberally in the evening until it's established.


3

Michigan is a great area for rhubarb - the only thing I don't know is how soon your winter kicks in, because, as you suspected, it is a bit late to start new plants off. I suggest you pot them up in good size pots immediately, so that any root material isn't cramped, water well, stand them outside and then prepare an area where you want to grow them. This ...


3

As you're in the UK, the timings olantigh mentions are more or less accurate - my info on rhubarb forcing says to cover the plants in December or January, then harvest as the stalks get large enough. I'm not a 'real' rhubarb grower, preferring to let mine grow perfectly naturally, but the info also suggests that the best time to topdress with well rotted ...


3

It depends where one lives but I do it in December and leave it on the plant until May. Overfeed them with plenty of manure, but don't let it touch the new growth -- keep it a finger's width away from them as this will and can burn them. When they are a size you want them, then harvest them but leave all the leaves on during the summer to recharge the root ...


3

Do you have just spots, or do some of those spots have holes? If there are holes, then according to "The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control", another possibility is rhubarb curculios: yellowish gray, powder covered, 1/2-3/4 inch snout beetles. They eat into the stalks to lay eggs. To control: Handpick adults. Eliminate ...


3

I need to establish some clarity regarding your question - first, when you say ginger grass, do you mean Paspalum distichum, common name ginger grass, or do you mean Zingiber officinale, the knobbly root grown for culinary/medicinal use, which also produces grass like leaves on top? I'm assuming you mean the latter, in which case, this plant grows in Zones ...


2

I would say you're best off waiting until fall, or early next spring. Transplanting shock is worse when plants are under extra stress. We're heading into summer now. The longest, hottest days of the year are just ahead of us. Transplanting now means putting the plant under extra stress from its roots being cut back just as it needs a strong root system the ...


2

The state of North Carolina says you can't grow rhubarb anywhere in the state except in mountainous areas. That said, my wife and I have been developing a method for over 18 years and got to the point last year that we grew about 300 pounds of rhubarb in eastern North Carolina about an hour east of Raleigh. It can be done, but you have to totally rethink ...


2

It's probably wasps. For some reason they love to eat holes in rhubarb leaves and stems. Normally they use dead wood or hogweed etc to build their nests so why live rhubarb I'm not sure. Would be interested to hear if anyone knows.


2

Watering gets tricky if soil has not been constantly watered. It becomes hydrophobic and sheds water like plastic. You have to water before run off and then water again and then water again. Stick your hose down into the soil. I've found animals tunnels that collect and divert an awful lot of water doing this. You'll be able to tell. Overhead watering ...


2

Well it can and does flower under certain conditions; first, some varieties are more prone to bolting or flowering, but otherwise, the factors are usually maturity, or conditions such as a very warm spring might trigger flowering, or stress such as suffering drought. Rhubarb crowns which are lifted and split when they get large enough are less likely to ...


1

Assuming these leaves are the lower and thus larger of the leaves of your rhubarb, this is totally normal. Using sharp pruning shears cut those leaves off as close to the ground as possible. Are you Fertilizing at all? Nitrogen is a mobile chemical in plants. Where there is too little Nitrogen, the Nitrogen the plant has in its own cells gets transferred ...


1

Depends how bad the damage is - it may form a callous, a woody area you won't want to eat anyway. Leave it, pick it, up to you, but if you're feeding anything with it, don't give the leaf, its toxic.


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