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12

The cost should not be that much different. In fact, you might find that it is cheaper to do it after everything else is done. First, your builder will likely subcontract the work and add a percentage to the project. Second, and I see this all the time, if irrigation goes in too soon, it often gets broken during construction or needs to be revised due to ...


9

If you want to write software probably you are looking for customized solutions, you have imagination and you don't mind to do it yourself. I suggest you try search with google: Arduino + Watering ( for example look at this document: THE GARDUINO GARDEN CONTROLLER It is a simple open-source platform with which many hobbyists have already ventured and you ...


7

If you wiggle the fitting from side to side while pulling, you can get it to step itself off the irrigation tube. This works for all sizes of these type push-in drip irrigation compression fittings. The tube itself might not reseal if you push another fitting on, but the fix is simple for the tube, cut off the marred surface or push on a little further. ...


7

Generically, go with large diameter pipe. Specifically, you'd need to run calculations based on water flow rate, pipe size, and dynamic head (pressure loss due to flow rate) against the available input pressure at flow, and the acceptable minimum and maximum pressure for the drip emitters. So, you have 250 emitters - but at what flow rate per emitter? If, ...


6

You can assemble a drip irrigation system on your own. If you’re the least bit handy, it’s not difficult at all. The system operates at low pressure, so the seals are as simple as punching a hole in a plastic tube and shoving in barbed fittings. For the larger fittings, a warm day and/or a rag with hot water to prewarm the inserted end do help. It’s ...


6

No, not unless you're frequently in long drought periods which cause the tree to go short. The tree will grow as well and as fast as its genes allow with sufficient water for its needs, enough space for root development, and preferably good, rich soil to grow in. What's likely to be at question is whether the builder improved the soil prior to planting with ...


5

I prefer drip emitter tubing over soaker hoses. They deliver more even and consistent watering throughout the length. You can get them with various emitter spacings from 6" to 18" or so. If you lay rows of tubes spaced the same distance apart as the emitter spacing you can get good watering over the entire bed. For example with 12" emitter spacing, place ...


5

If you're techie enough to mess with code, feel free to use mine. I built an arduino-based solar powered one that cues off soil moisture levels instead of timing. https://github.com/kolosy/irrigation


5

A company called Irrigation Caddy makes a great product that runs on an internal network, and even has mods for remote offsite management depending on your router and web skills. http://www.irrigationcaddy.com/


5

First of all, thank you for posting a detailed explanation and such numerous and helpful photos. The appearance of the leaves in most of plantings is indicative of over watering and root rot. Symptoms: the leaf is a dull green rather than shiny the leaf lacks turgor. The leaf is limp even though the soil appears moist. it appears that the plants on the ...


5

I would use a shut-off ball valve (as opposed to a butterfly) such as the one pictured, turned to the required gpm.


5

In terms of water? There is no difference. If you were piping and storing acidic or alkaline fluids, then there would only be one choice for each. HDPE will likely last longer if left alone once put in place, and LDPE will get brittle sooner, but if you need to flex your tubes periodically LDPE may be your better choice because it is more flexible and will ...


5

There are a few tools available to help you with this process. I would suggest getting a donut sod cutter or a Sprinkler Head removal tool. They're designed to cut a small hole around the sprinkler head to allow easier access without having to dig up a big area around the head. You can also get a sprinkler head wrench to help free the head from the pipe. ...


5

Spray some WD-40 and then try to move the balls with a piece of rubber, or with your finger wearing rubber gloves. I've used this technique to free a sensor wheel from a thermal heater clogged with mud and debris.


4

This does likely have something to do with watering, but there are several issues here. When watering, it is better to give the water all at one time, ideally over a period of ½ hour, and make sure it soaks in well. Then let it dry for a time before watering again. The time will depend on environmental factors, such as temperature, precipitation, and ...


4

You've mentioned seeds as well as transplants, so I'm assuming the bed has seeds planted in it already? If that's the case, trying to put in a soaker hose will be next to impossible without disrupting what's been planted already. I think I'd stick to sprinkler watering, but do it in the early morning instead - that way, any moisture lurking on any leaves ...


4

That's an unconventional setup with the 2 GPH emitters as connectors and I think it may be the cause of the problem unless that's how the 1/4" drip line was meant to be fed but I think that's unlikely. Normally you would use a connector that punches into the 1/2" line to connect the 1/4" line which doesn't create any restriction in flow. Typically drip ...


4

It is very unlikely you'll be able to adjust the faucet so that the drip system works well and doesn't over water your garden while leaving it on all the time. plants also don't want to be constantly wet. Reduces the amount of oxygen and nutrients they can take, increases chances of disease and weed seed germination. Just get the timer and remember you'll ...


4

A Strap Wrench would be the generic approach to this (intended as an example of the type, not a specific recommendation of brand or store) (and in my usual process of answer the question then read other answers and comments, I see that's what you did in a comment - If you'd like to post that as an answer I can get rid of this one): If you don't care about ...


4

Sorry, I disagree with Stormy here - and this is 1 area I have experience - you absolutely can grow tomatos well on a schedule and with automated watering. (I've done it sort of - I have done it proper with Eggplants - commercially - and had a couple of tomatos, cucumbers and Zucchini just plugged into the identical system - while it is ideal for ...


4

In general, I find ordering from Rainbird's website to be cheaper (and have more options) than ordering from Amazon for almost everything except tubing. Components (elbows, T-splits, emitters, etc...) are much cheaper. On the other hand, tubing (even Rainbird's tubing!) seems to be cheaper on Amazon. Also check Rainbird's clearance section, I found some ...


4

I tend to agree with @Bamboo. It might be good to gently do a little exploratory digging around the base of the trees to make sure the contractors removed the tree bags used to hold the root ball together. From what I've seen leaving the bags on (especially if they aren't just plain burlap) seems to be a death sentence for the tree. Another thing to ...


4

One of the cool features of greenhouses is that you have more control. Storing water makes more sense rather than hit or miss by rain...to include over watering. Our gardens are always going to be artificial. We humans will always be completely responsible for every little thing our plants our crops need to survive. If you want to be successful with ...


3

a) Those emitters appear to deliver very little water even when under the correct pressure, and they really only deliver to a single spot. Water must move through the soil to reach other areas, and the horizontal distance across which the water will move will depend on the soil characteristics, existing moisture content in the soil, and the duration of flow ...


3

Let's ponder the concept of "so you put some plants out in the yard and they get rained on" - it's the same water - so it really should not be any worse. If you incorporate a standard trick of roof rainwater collection ("roof-washing") - basically letting the first few gallons go, so that any accumulated dust/bird poop on the roof and the initial pollutants ...


3

Safety is really difficult and/or expensive to attest as J. Musser has pointed out. Your storage containers and gutter material will determine the nature of what is in your water (Roof quality does seem to be a big deal from looking it up online). At a minimum, you could use pH as a measure to see what your rain water composition is. If you are very close ...


3

This advice from Gardening Australia may be relevant Good quality water that is low in dissolved salts is a rare commodity in many parts of Australia, and is necessary for growing blueberries; as well a slightly acidic free-draining loam is ideal, and an open sunny aspect. If you could tell us what kind of blueberry that would be helpful as the low ...


3

I have used two wi-fi controllers for our irrigation from http://www.hottimesoftware.com/wifi-time-control.htm and are happy with the results. Uses the Raspberry Pi to operate the solenoids and can be set to auto or manual functions. I can now control from anywhere in the world with my smart phone.


3

This is a subject that is almost political in nature. Most regard a "Deep and infrequent" plan of watering to be the best approach. The idea is that deep watering promotes deep roots, which in turn enables the lawn to sustain droughts. The evidence supporting this idea is spotty, and the logic doesn't make sense to me. For a full explanation, see my ...


3

I was concerned about the flow in this application, because for my set-up four spray heads would need at least 360 U.S. gallons per hour (1.5 gpm × 4 × 60 min, 1365 L/hr), and the 1/2" tubing allows for much lesser flow. For instance, Dig Corporation’s Drip Irrigation Installation Guide specifies that the maximum flow rate in their 1/2" (0.600" to be exact, ...


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