9

Of the eight pictures only the third picture shows a cedar that will look good. The rest are either dead or so badly damaged it would take years before they looked good. This kind of dieback is often seen when they are not adequately watered after planting or when stock is planted late in the fall and doesn't have a chance to root before winter. ...


7

Your trees are in very bad shape. Most of them will take quite a while to recover, if they do. At this point it would be suggested that you replace them. It's always best to plant these in the spring, before new growth begins, and the sun is less intense. The cooler temperatures and shorter days will relieve some of the stress. Make sure the plants stay well ...


6

I believe it is a Dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides) This tree looks and feels like a sequoia (and even terrestrial examples of bald cypress), but is not evergreen. Foliage turns red/brown before it drops it's leaves. More info here and here. [


6

It seems your trees (yes, Leyland cypresses are trees) were never properly trimmed, more likely planted once and then left alone. Which means they behaved like all trees planted closely together: Gained height quickly, losing density. And all conifers tend to become bare on the bottom and inner branches. Now, the "almost fake" looking hedge you are talking ...


5

My superficial understanding of the machinery of photosynthesis is that the role of carotenoids is to protect against the destructive effects of light and reactive oxygen. The yellow coloring xanthophyll, in particular, combats reactive oxygen. Photo system 2 (PSII) captures photons to hydrolyze water, creating reactive oxygen in the thylakoid lumens. The ...


5

Those are Taxus, or yew. Which means you're in luck! That's because Taxus are one of the few conifers that can regrow from adventitious buds on old wood. This means that you can cut them back hard (which destroyed most conifers), and they will grow out again. Take it back as far as you need, but go back to a live branchlet where possible, so not leaving a ...


5

This is the Bird's Nest Blue Spruce. I think. Picea abies 'nidiformus'...grins...If this went down that quickly, I'd look at the last fertilization (do you have an outside maintenance company), Blue Spruce Aphid or adelgid and I would also look at the base of the trunk where it goes into the soil. If there is any trunk at all under the soil and mulch we ...


4

Fully ripened needles (from the last growing season) will last longest. In most areas, needles are fully ripened by late summer. Before that, use needles from the previous season. Also, naturally, the cooler the temperatures the needles are kept in, the longer they will last. Older needles can be used too, but each year you go back there will be some ...


4

Some ideas, a few questions. I hope the container you've transferred it to has open drainage holes at the bottom, and that you don't leave it standing in any outer tray which has water in it all the time. It's also not clear whether you had this tree indoors during the Christmas period, and then moved it straight outside once the festivities were over. ...


4

Note that those are well-shaped, in that they are wider are the bottom and narrower at the top. People often make the mistake of trying to make them vertical, which leads to the bottom dying away since it gets very little light. Depending on your level of urgency, rather than moving them (which is fine if you feel urgent, and lots of labor), I'd go with ...


4

Minimum 12'-15' apart will reward all of us in the years to come, you and your neighbor as well. Green Giant are beautiful, deer resistant evergreens and very fast growing. Green Giant Arborvitae can create beautiful screens when planted responsibly and this is all about the spacing. No closer than 12' apart.


4

Plant them 5-7' apart for a privacy screen, 15-20' apart otherwise. These trees mature at 35-60' tall and up to 15' wide. I you want a screen, you may like the result even better if you stagger the trees, rather than planting them in a straight row.


4

Ouch! What an investment you've made. I am sorry. All but the totally green ones will not make it. What kind of soil is in your terraced beds? What is your irrigation schedule? What did you use for fertilizer, soil ammendments? What is the orientation of these beds. Did you buy these in pots or b&b? Let us help you to not make this mistake again. ...


4

I agree with Ecnerwal. Both white pines and cedars in the wild will drop needles or leaves in the fall. If you can find wild stands of these trees you will notice there is little else growing on the forest floor due to the "duff" or ground cover of old needles. As to how much is normal this can only be answered by "it depends". ...


4

No. Most conifers, once cut down, will die, so if you removed all the trunk and topgrowth, the rootball on its own is the equivalent of incipient compost. Or doomed, dead, extinct, basically, not going to grow again.


4

At school for propagation of cuttings we were told "Cool tops, misty middles and hot bottoms." The "hot" part is there for dramatic effect; warmth is the point. The critical thing is to get the roots forming ("strike") fairly rapidly by encouraging constant warmth in the rooting zone. Warmth brings risks of fungus attacks, so all cuts must be clean and ...


4

A big mistake many people make when planting trees and shrubs is to either plant them too deeply or mulch them too incorrectly. The fact that you had to scrape soil away from the trunk to get a photo of the trunk trying to put out roots indicates that the plant was planted too deep or mulched wrong; my guess is that it was planted too low or sank after ...


4

One group won't work to make this look. You would need at least 3 groupings of the same species...5 groupings using the same species but differing amounts of each species, some groups without one or two species. I would chose 4 species; a couple that are tall and columnar, a couple that are globular and medium height and one or two that are low and ...


4

Junipers tend to do better with their roots covered. Your suggestion is apt, but I actually, it should be set deeper in the pot. However, I see a number of things that raise additional concerns. Firstly, I assume the pot it is in has at least one drain hole. If not, either find a similar one that does or buy a diamond hole saw at your local hardware store ...


4

Black thumb the middle of winter is just fine to prune anything. I prune a little on any and all plants any old time when I've got the pruners sharpened sterilized and in my hands. I love to prune. If you are thinking of limbing up the trunk of your conifer, 7'? you should have a good reason why. It is sort of a no no for aesthetics as well as health of ...


3

Not a bad idea, unless you wanted a tree with branches close to the ground. You can do pretty much whatever you want with trees as long as you don't do anything that will cut off oxygen from getting to the roots (e.g., pave over them, raise the ground level) AND always leave so green above ground. WYSIWYwG.


3

If you've only just planted it, dig it up and reposition it if you want, if you think it'll look better that way. It may not grow from the side which currently has no branches anyway. Keep well watered.


3

There are two trees that look very similar, on is the dawn redwood and the other is the bald cypress, both trees are deciduous conifers. the main difference is the growth habit is slightly different, here is a video with more info... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIlu0I3Pulw in short, yours has alternate needles and branches (it looks like to me) and ...


3

Internally shaded parts of pretty much all dense evergreens will die off due to lack of light, as the exterior parts grow and shade them out. When light levels reaching a leaf become too low for the plant to get a net benefit from the leaf, it cuts its losses and shuts the leaf down.


3

That is winter burn. It is caused by the dehydration of the foliage during abnormally long or cold winters. Evergreens let off water vapor throughout the winter through their leaves, but the roots cannot replenish the supply, while frozen. The yellow areas are dead, and you should follow each dead stem back to a live green shoot or bud, and trim it off ...


3

Those are Yew. If you cut them back drastically, it will take a long time before new foliage fills in the voids. Based on their size, I'd say they were planted way too close to the sidewalk. If you feel up to it, I personally would move them back 1 or 2 ft. Otherwise I think you will want to trim them back a little at a time over the next few years.


3

Needles live on spruce trees for 2 to 3 years then drop. You don't notice this on most trees, as the bare twigs are on the interior of the tree. Few spruce tolerate root immersion for more than a few days during the active growth period. P. glauca tolerates immersion in spring during the melt. -- O2 demand by the roots is low, since the top is still ...


3

Sometimes fast growing conifers put out lots of growth into the leaders and the soft new growth bends over. Usually it straightens on its own. If it hardens while bent, you can head it back a little. be sure to go back near a strong growth bud, and the tree will use that to grow a new leader. They are strongly apically dominant. Also, if there is more than ...


3

Everything that Stephie said is fine. However, the trimming would most likely work for the right side of the hedge (right side of the last photo), but for the left hand side, it would be a difficult uphill battle. Simply, there is not enough branches with green leaves in that area that would be able to produce desired new growth, no matter how often you ...


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