9

Another point of view. The beetles usually only attack trees that are compromised healthwise. They don't generally attack small trees. By the time the trees are large enough to attack, the beetles will have moved on, looking for new food sources, and the trees are going to be no more susceptible than any others. The trees should be kept healthy; the ...


7

In one word, no, sorry! Training an evergreen by practicing topiary starts when the plant is small and involves repeated prunings over a few years. If you took your existing evergreens and pruned them into spiral shapes you would expose inside areas of the plant where there is no growth. Most evergreens do not bud or grow from old wood with the exception ...


7

In my 25 years as a landscaper in the Pacific Northwest, I have never heard of such a treatment. With that said, the only thinking I can come up with is that the arborist feels that by watering in the tree, you will be overly compacting the soil, destroying the larger air pockets, and trapping excess water around the rootball which might cause rot. I would ...


7

The bottom branches dying is perfectly normal, as they get shaded out (they also have more deer pressure, assuming a typical presence of rats-with-hooves in your neighborhood.) That is not a sign of a dying tree at all. Maintaining greenery to the ground requires actively trimming and shaping to keep the tops from shading out the bottoms - I don't think ...


6

I wonder whether turtles mind bitter greens? What we find unpalatable might be just fine with them. And some of the most nutritious greens out there aren't the ones we tend to prefer the taste of. Also, from what little I understand of tortoise diets, getting the proper balance of nutrients through appropriate foods for your particular type of tortoise is ...


6

The pictures help a lot. These trees were eaten back, but not too far for a good recovery. The fastest way to get them looking normal will be shearing. Shear back the areas the deer didn't hit, and while you're at it, you can do the others, to match. Do not cut past the growth line, where there are plenty of green stems to regrow from. Also, don't cut the ...


6

It seems a loquat ( Eriobotrya japonica, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loquat). It is a evergreen, and produce edible fruits.


6

It's a mountain heath or heather, Phyllodoce empetriformis, a native perennial shrubby plant which has,variously, pale pink to deep pink to, occasionally, mauve-pink bell shaped flowers throughout summer. Classed as an alpine or sub alpine plant, likes acid soil conditions and prefers damp soil http://www.flora.dempstercountry.org/0.Site.Folder/Species....


6

Attempting to prune a large conifer down to a small size is unlikely to end well - if it survives at all, you will end up with something that looks like "a big tree that has been attacked by a chainsaw" not "a small tree". But you can certainly grow a dwarf conifer in a pot or container, provided you accept that most dwarf conifers don't look like exactly ...


5

According to this site, strategic candling can give your pine an appearance called "cloud style" that looks like the below image. They explain the technique as: Candling for a smooth look (you might have seen the "cloud"-style pruning favored in Japanese gardening) is simple. Just start breaking off the soft growth on the uppermost part of your ...


5

My desert tortoise loves bean leaves, and will eat kale if he's hungry enough. But I prefer to feed him native plants. I let him go for walks in the yard and observe what he eats, then tend those plants and try to propagate them. I don't actually know the names of all the plants he likes, but one of his favorites is globe mallow. I let one globe mallow ...


5

Those are Taxus, or yew. Which means you're in luck! That's because Taxus are one of the few conifers that can regrow from adventitious buds on old wood. This means that you can cut them back hard (which destroyed most conifers), and they will grow out again. Take it back as far as you need, but go back to a live branchlet where possible, so not leaving a ...


5

Evergreen trimmings certainly are compostable, but if there are lots of large, woody branches, they'll take a very long time to compost down. If you have a shredder, you can speed that process up by shredding the wood first. If you dried out large branches, preferably removing the green leafy parts for composting first, they'd burn quicker and more cleanly, ...


5

Depends how quickly you want your privacy hedge to be dense - as you say, the predicted eventual spread is 3-4 feet, but at ten years, the spread is predicted at 24-30 inches per plant. If you don't mind waiting till the trees have reached full maturity, you can plant them 3 to 4 feet apart, but if you want the hedge to give full privacy within five years or ...


5

In my opinion, it is not a big deal. Six hours are enough. You can cut some branches of the other tree, and wait the spruce to grow, so it will get more sun. In nature, young tree tend to grow in semi-shadows (most will die or be dormant also for decades in shadows, waiting a old tree to fall). I just expect that it will grow very slow, but (also in my ...


4

Note that those are well-shaped, in that they are wider are the bottom and narrower at the top. People often make the mistake of trying to make them vertical, which leads to the bottom dying away since it gets very little light. Depending on your level of urgency, rather than moving them (which is fine if you feel urgent, and lots of labor), I'd go with ...


4

Minimum 12'-15' apart will reward all of us in the years to come, you and your neighbor as well. Green Giant are beautiful, deer resistant evergreens and very fast growing. Green Giant Arborvitae can create beautiful screens when planted responsibly and this is all about the spacing. No closer than 12' apart.


4

Plant them 5-7' apart for a privacy screen, 15-20' apart otherwise. These trees mature at 35-60' tall and up to 15' wide. I you want a screen, you may like the result even better if you stagger the trees, rather than planting them in a straight row.


4

The tree is suffering from nutrient deficiency due to an unsuitably high soil pH. To properly absorb nutrients, these trees need a lower pH, like 4.5-6.0. Organic matter will be useful in helping the microbes thrive that feed the tree, but they will not live in a high pH. Try applying sulphur to the area in a circle around the tree about twice the diameter ...


4

Well it's an unripe pine cone, much more mundane than the exciting suggestion of 'a pineapple grown near a nuclear power plant', sadly - though not necessarily from the Pinus family. The trouble is, to be absolutely sure what tree it is, you'd need to examine the foliage closely and to look at the overall growth habit. This cone is obviously very fresh, it ...


4

Cedars or arborvitae can take a lot of damage by pruning or being eaten. As you have found on the web even severely damaged trees will grow back but the question is how long will it take. I see cedar hedges that have been topped, about the worst thing you could do to an evergreen, after two or three years you would not know. The real question is what can ...


4

If the burned branches are completely dead, your first step is to cut out the dead parts. Keep in mind that white pines do not regrow from old wood, so even if the base of a dead branch/branchlet is alive, you should cut it back to the next growing part (trunk, branch). The next step is the shearing. Be aware of where viable growth buds are located and do ...


4

Not to worry, this guy does suck on your tree but they rarely do any damage. It is a Spittlebug or Froghopper. Each of those globs is one insect, a nymph that manages to hide himself in...excrement by bubbling a viscous liquid. This is great protection from predators and the elements. Easy to control, just spray with a hard stream of water. Your tree ...


4

It is best to prune cedar hedges more than once during the growing season, starting in the spring after the sap is running. This will prevent the plant from excessive dehydration. See here. To encourage growth in the bare spots, you can try cutting out all of the dead wood in the area. Cedars do not often sprout well from old wood, but if the bare spots are ...


4

Since the tree is small, if you have the time, you can kill the bugs by taking a cotton swab or cotton ball dipped in pure rubbing alcohol and giving each of the critters a good swabbing drench with it. This should kill them pretty much immediately, although it may not make them drop from the plant. A nice blast of water to all the sides of the branches ...


4

if they were cut at the dripline, and only on one side, I suppose that means a good bit less than 1/4 of the roots have been cut. Assuming that the tree is between 16 and 22" in diameter four and a half feet above ground, your structural root radius (that you can't safety be cutting within) will be 8-9'. This is the root plate, which supports the tree. ...


4

Yes, it will if those cedars are healthy. You should investigate to find out why the shoots died. Some possible causes with freshly planted cedars are: inadequate watering; new plants need a lot of water the first season too much watering: are they planted in a very wet area? spider mites or scale or leaf miner are common problems. See here physical damage ...


4

I personally would shred them all and use it as tree mulch. Stuff that can't be shredded can be buried, and you can plant over it. Although incinerating tree material is considered a carbon neutral activity, it doesn't take account of the loss of nutrient from the soil. The law of return says that which is taken from the ground must be returned otherwise ...


4

First, its important to say that trying to keep most conifer varieties small by regular pruning isn't a good idea, unless its one of those that doesn't mind being cut, like Yew. Second, whichever one you choose, you're likely to be able to keep it in a pot for not longer than five years at most, unless you put it in a pot that's so large you won't be able to ...


4

Blue spruces only need full sun to reach their top growth potential, they do not require it to be healthy. They will grow very well in shade, if they are not under another tree's dripline, and if there aren't many other tree roots in the soil. Under a dripline, and in dense rooted ground, a spruce will grow much slower (sometimes less than 6" a year), and ...


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