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21

No, in your lifetime, normal amounts of pine needles will not measurably acidify your soil. They are somewhat acidic, and acidify soil over long periods of time, unless the soil base is extremely alkaline. They don't acidify soil more than other deciduous tree leaves, and oak leaves in particular (they have a pH of 4.5 to 4.7). Rain does leach the acid out, ...


11

New research tools have allowed arborists to learn more about tree roots. Tree roots can extend as far as two or three times the width of the drip line, or the farthest point from the tree where foliage grows. Pine trees are not known for having invasive root systems but if the soil is dry roots will go where the water is. Most roots grow within the top ...


9

Another point of view. The beetles usually only attack trees that are compromised healthwise. They don't generally attack small trees. By the time the trees are large enough to attack, the beetles will have moved on, looking for new food sources, and the trees are going to be no more susceptible than any others. The trees should be kept healthy; the ...


7

This is reaction to the cold and there is not much you can do in addition to providing bright diffuse light and consistent watering. The Norfolk Island Pine is quick to tell you about it's environment: grown outside in the tropics the leaves point upwards grown inside in lower light the leaves arch downwards too dry environment leads to whole branches being ...


6

Mulch around the tree frequently, and pull out any small plants growing at the base of it. Only water if soil is dry, because overwatering is a major killer. Only prune dead or diseased branches. To protect it from animals a plywood sunscreen can also protect it from insects. However if you live with large animals like deers, you may need a plastic tube or ...


6

I don't know that I'd consider it dangerous to plant the tree that close, but from a design perspective I wouldn't do it with any large tree - the tree will eventually dwarf the house and the effect will not be pleasing to the eye. Seeing that the tree is also a pine, I'm assuming that as the tree grows it will become wide enough to probably interfere with ...


5

No, it makes no difference, dying and dead needles will fall off eventually on their own anyway. The trick, IF your tree has roots, is really to not keep it in the house long enough for that to happen - but some hardening off is required before placing outside permanently, so it can acclimatize over 4 or 5 days to outdoor temperatures compared to indoor ones....


5

According to this site, strategic candling can give your pine an appearance called "cloud style" that looks like the below image. They explain the technique as: Candling for a smooth look (you might have seen the "cloud"-style pruning favored in Japanese gardening) is simple. Just start breaking off the soft growth on the uppermost part of your ...


5

From here the Norfolk Island Pine likes The ideal indoor climate for this species is bright and cool, with daytime temperatures ranging from 60 to 70 degrees and slightly cooler at night. My experiences with this plant is that the dry conditions (relative humidity less than 40%) that are so common inside our houses are not ideal for this plant. ...


5

My (limited) understanding of Norfolk Pines is that they: Don't like to be re-potted and will sometimes go into shock when this is done. Like a moist environment and some folks will mist them weekly. It is my understanding that they are originally from a subtropical climate. Can exhibit the curling up when being over-watered or under-watered. How often ...


5

I think it is possible. You should just find a good place. Near my home (on the other side of the valley) there is two trees (more than 40 years old). Windy situation and not the best place, but in Zone 8b (European standard, so not very continental climate). It seems just that it is not growing fast, but many conifers are so. It seems that Kew gardens (...


4

The tree is suffering from nutrient deficiency due to an unsuitably high soil pH. To properly absorb nutrients, these trees need a lower pH, like 4.5-6.0. Organic matter will be useful in helping the microbes thrive that feed the tree, but they will not live in a high pH. Try applying sulphur to the area in a circle around the tree about twice the diameter ...


4

if they were cut at the dripline, and only on one side, I suppose that means a good bit less than 1/4 of the roots have been cut. Assuming that the tree is between 16 and 22" in diameter four and a half feet above ground, your structural root radius (that you can't safety be cutting within) will be 8-9'. This is the root plate, which supports the tree. ...


4

If one of them is Araucaria heterophylla, and the other potted plants are also large (eventually) plants, and you say the light is good, then the problem is likely to be the size of the pot. The Araucaria wants to become a large tree, so if it doesn't have enough root room, you are likely to get a long stem with some growth on the top over time. Photographs ...


4

The pine needles shouldn't really impede the growth of the grass unless they wind up covering the ground quite thick. It is common to put straw or other cover on grass seed to protect it from too much sun, animals, erosion, etc. BUT if those "old roots" you removed were actually from said pine tree, this could cause the pine tree to drop a lot of needles ...


4

Yes, Pinus pinea will grow in zone 8 (minimum temperature from -6.7°C to -12.1°C or 19.9°F to 10.2°F), as stated in Conifer Cold Hardiness, section 1, chapter 'Frost Resistance and the Distribution of Conifers' by Bannister and Neuner, page 16, because it stands a minimum temperature of -16°C or 3.2°F. Unfortunately, this tree will not survive in Craiova, ...


4

I suggest you check your trees thoroughly, or get an arborist to do it - they should not be leaking pitch at all, and especially not in excessive amounts. The fact that they are indicates a problem of some sort - maybe canker, fusarium infection, or something less dangerous (in terms of compromising the tree from a safety point of view) such as an insect ...


4

Many people would say that you can't do this safely. If the roots are showing the tree is responding by bringing the roots to the surface to get oxygen since the soil is poorly draining or if the top soil is very shallow. If you do put dirt on top ( 2 inches ) of the roots and it doesn't kill the tree, then you may find the roots rise up again so that you'...


3

If you've got 16 seedlings going, leave them right where they are for the winter. To try and transplant into pots now is very iffy. The roots of a plant are the most vulnerable to cold, next would be leaves. That is why deciduous trees lose their leaves for winter. Pines or conifers have evergreen needles made for surviving the cold. Even the needles on ...


3

Do you have this plant in a container or in the ground? If in the ground I'd be more concerned with maintaining a pH range that satisfies this plant's needs and I'd fertilize organically by topdressing with compost or watering with compost tea regularly. I believe but might be mistaken that this plant prefers soil slightly more acidic than the average ...


3

I am a certified home inspector, Mr Home Check, and former Realtor. There is no need to cut down the tree until you see where the root system actually is. It has been there for quite some time and will not do anything immediately different than it is currently doing. Contact a local tree company and ask them about the individual tree. and go from there. ...


3

Turpentine beetleI don't think that replanting plants that have got a community of insects feeding off of them would be a good idea. Granted the storm weakened them, but healthy plants are going to be feeding the beetle larvae that have found the original pines. I'd find a good indigenous tree that hasn't had any problems with insects, now or in the past. ...


3

Replanting trees in this environment will likely result in weakened plants and simply feed the insect population. As J. Musser above mentions, establishing a base of hardy shrubbery is necessary first.


3

You could search out smaller or dwarf varieties (such as a Mugo Pine for example) rather than plant traditional "pine trees". This gives you a leg up on the battle. Then treat/prune them like other Topiaries. There is a significant difference between bonzai and topiary. One is simply shaped/pruned and then maintained, others are carefully groomed and ...


3

I saw a Pinus flexilis that looked just like this about 7 years ago. The cause wasn't root rot but incorrect planting - it was planted about 4-6 inches too deep. This was embarrassing because the nursery that I worked at was the one that had planted it. Oops. The plant had been in the ground 4 years, I think. The tree looked great that spring, but crashed ...


3

It won't do any harm to keep the plastic around it. However, plastic does not really insulate well. I would recommend wrapping it into several layers of cloth instead. If you do think the tree won't survive the cold, go to your local farm shop and buy a bunch of tree bark to spread around its base, this will keep the cold from penetrating to the roots too ...


3

This article from Trees for Life talks about Scotts pine and chanterelle mushrooms being symbiotic, perhaps you can get something tasty from your pines as well! Mycroryzal nets can mesh with an entire forest work of plants, even sharing carbon between different tree species.


3

I would say zero for clay soil. however; my large pines ( 4 ft. D , 100 ft tall) had up to 6 in, of sand put around them with no problem ; done 22 years ago. Porous material like mulch should not be a problem. Big old pines like this "self" mulch up to a foot deep close to the trunk with old bark scaling off.


3

Are these these Pinus pinea? Are the trees prone to falling down in your area? I would ask a local tree specialist to look at the trees and your soil and their root system. If their roots are stable in your soil, regular pruning of dead branches by a professional would probably be the best thing to do. It seems it would be a shame to cut them down completely ...


3

It is a pine (or more specifically, Picea abies, often known as spruce rather than pine, but a member of the Pine family) an old fashioned Christmas tree in fact - it will be okay for the Christmas period if you keep it away from heat sources and make sure it's watered. Unfortunately, though, these trees do not make good houseplants - they need to be ...


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