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9

That's a pretty prolific plant. You should have no trouble propagating it from cuttings, but… you have to select the right growth stage to cut from. You should only root from the newer (but not too new) growth. The best time is late spring to early summer when the newer growth is just starting to become woody. Cut sections of about 6-12" and strip ...


8

The time you spend in preparation is as, or more, important than post planting time. site location, cedars like access to water, not soggy and not dry some shade is fine and full sun is tolerated if the soil is not too dry a wide variety of soil types but I would avoid very sandy soils or soils low in organic matter protection from winter winds. Cedars that ...


8

Invasive plants that will be easy to establish and grow enthusiastically all over the fence will need cutting back every year. You might be better off compromising with something somewhat slower to establish and easier to maintain. Something also to consider is dealing with the cuttings of an enthusiastically growing plant. Woody plants are more difficult ...


6

The shortest answer is no. I have grape vines all over the property, and they will re-sprout from any stems underground, and from any roots thicker than 1/4" in diameter. The best method to remove them, in my experience, is to trim all excess vegetation in the hedge bushes 8" from the ground, down, with the crowns cleaned out, and cut everything else out to ...


6

Is it a pittosporum - possibly Pittosporum Screenmaster? I looked on the web and found a number of pictures of trees looking very much like these trees eg check out this link.


6

It's a bit of a tall order, wanting plants that perform best in spring, summer and winter and not autumn, but I've had a go! Check out Ruscus aculeatus, the variety 'Sparkler' if you can get it, because that one's hermaphrodite and will produce red berries which last well into Winter. Otherwise, you'd need a mix of male and female to get berries. It's ...


6

Bamboo might be a good option as they are evergreen, grow fairly tall and also grow pretty fast here. There are clumping varieties available that don't attempt to escape your yard, but a root barrier is probably your best bet just to be sure. Bamboo come in some interesting colors besides just plain green. I'd normally suggest rhododendrons or evergreen ...


6

There's an interesting piece of research online carried out in June 2005 at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, and published in the Horticultural Research Institute Journal; one of the subjects in the trial was Thuja Emerald Green. Under control conditions, they were planted with various amendments (bio gels, mycorrhizal fungi and various other ...


6

There's no easy answer I'm afraid - pyracantha hedges can be kept neat and tidy and shaped to whatever form you choose, but once they've overgrown, they're less easy to cut because of the thickness of the stems. Loppers, secateurs and a hedge trimmer are exactly the tools you need. Use the hedge trimmer to get it to roughly the height and width you want - ...


6

One common problem is trying to grow them with the sides completely vertical - they do better if the top is narrower than the bottom. If the top is wider than the bottom it will shade the bottom out. Your pictures seem to show an untrimmed (or untrimmed for a long time) "hedge" which I'd call more "a row of trees let go, than a hedge" and in that condition ...


6

It seems your trees (yes, Leyland cypresses are trees) were never properly trimmed, more likely planted once and then left alone. Which means they behaved like all trees planted closely together: Gained height quickly, losing density. And all conifers tend to become bare on the bottom and inner branches. Now, the "almost fake" looking hedge you are talking ...


6

I would choose a climbing plant. Many of them can be pruned, to that you create some holes. I think it is better to have strong sun on few places (sun moves), then translucent leaves. Maybe some rose (if you take wild types, you get edible fruits, and they are usually strong and climbing). On plus side: they make also a physical barrier (with spikes), but ...


6

The least expensive tool to use that will also be effective are loppers and a ladder. That hedger is not meant for this level of hedging. Not even close. A ladder, sharp/bypass loppers with long handles, could do this job within an hour including debris cleanup. Focus on the height just below the top of the fence. Don't try to be perfect, let there be at ...


6

To answer the part of your question... The lilly pilly is currently flowering. Is it a good time to trim it? No, do not prune while it is flowering. As a general “rule of thumb” for pruning shrubs and trees, prune after flowering and before too much new growth has progressed. There are obviously exceptions to this rule. This does apply to your ...


5

Thujas like a fair amount of "food" to jump start them after xfer/transplant. Purchase some sort of evergreen fertilizer product ("M Roots" is one name brand) that has a mycorrhiza element within it as these are the fungi that help with the nutrient transfer for a healthy plant. Also, we have used a 1:1:1 mixture of organic compost, loam, and peat moss for ...


5

My guess is something related to your soil. I'd get the soil tested and see what the results are. It's very possible that it is just over watering but that looks like a decent investment and a soil test is relatively cheap. If you have a university near by that does horticulture type work they probably provide cheap soil tests and advice.


5

I have used cotoneaster with great success for covering fences and walls that have gaps. I live in central Scotland, so I would guess you could get better growth in London. An example from paulnoll.com:


5

It would be easy to make 30m of hedge look like one long hedge with the electric trimmer. It would also be easy to get carried away and trim too much with the electric model. I would get both. I'd rough-cut a general shape with the electric and do detail work with the hand shears. In my experience with electric trimmers, they tend to be underpowered and ...


5

I'm in London too, and although this year has been very wet, most years we're dry as dust by August, so water might be an issue in future years. You haven't said which way the 'fence' faces - if it gets plenty of sun, consider Trachelospermum jasminoides - evergreen, fragrant white flowers in summer. Can be slow to get going, but spreads up to 33 feet once ...


5

Let me just say to begin: I... HATE... GRAPEVINE. While it's considered a decorative plant by many, for me it's become an insidious weed that resist my best efforts to eradicate it from my yard. I want to get rid of it because the previous homeowner didn't take care of it, and as a result its unchecked growth has resulted in my deck sprouting new shoots up ...


5

Depending on your space...STAGGER your plants making an equilateral triangle between 3 plants. 2' distance on each side or more (how high did you want to make this hedge?). 2'is great for a 6-8' hedge. Leave more distance for a taller hedge. If you see one of your arborvitaes begin to 'flag', a particular branch versus all over, get it diagnosed (...


5

The Ivy will be in flower, and is a valuable source of nectar for bees and wasps at this time of year. Activity on the part of those insects will be highest on sunny, warmer days, but just wait a couple of weeks, pick a chilly but dry day, or wait till late afternoon before dusk to do it. Bees can sting too, of course, but its the wasps that are the real ...


4

If you are patient enough to do it, I think its worth going through with a pair of small hand pruners (Fishers makes a very small pair for indoor floral work) and cutting free the tendrils wrapped around stalks of shrubs and branches. If you DON'T do this, they dry & harden and become more difficult to remove, often cutting into the soft tissue/bark of ...


4

There are several possibilities. This might be cultural, that is, when you trimmed it, you cut that browned area too far back, into old wood, and these trees don't regenerate from old wood. If the weather was hot and dry for a couple of weeks after you trimmed it, then some patches may have had trouble regenerating, even if you didn't cut too far back. ...


4

It is best to prune cedar hedges more than once during the growing season, starting in the spring after the sap is running. This will prevent the plant from excessive dehydration. See here. To encourage growth in the bare spots, you can try cutting out all of the dead wood in the area. Cedars do not often sprout well from old wood, but if the bare spots are ...


4

I would say that it is worth the time, based on my sharpening experiences. Here is a nice e-how article on the process that breaks it down better than I ever could. I've only sharpened trimmers a few times, but I have sharpened chainsaw chains by hand quite a bit with a round file and it didn't take long at all. Just a bit of patience. The trick is to be ...


4

You need somewhere for the water to go. If there is anywhere close by that is lower than the planting area then: dig a trench to the lower area about six inches wide and at least six to twelve inches deep. Place four inch perforated drain pipe with sleeve in the trench backfill the first four inches with gravel Optional -place a layer of landscaping fabric ...


4

I agree with Ecnerwal. Both white pines and cedars in the wild will drop needles or leaves in the fall. If you can find wild stands of these trees you will notice there is little else growing on the forest floor due to the "duff" or ground cover of old needles. As to how much is normal this can only be answered by "it depends". Competition and ...


4

Leyland Cypress is a popular privacy tree on the west coast, and will also grow well on the east coast from what I have heard. It can be planted as a dense hedge, and provides year round color. They are very hardy, and with fertilizer/good soil can grow 3 feet a year. They will get quite tall if you don't keep them under control, but they accept pruning well,...


4

Depends how quickly you want your privacy hedge to be dense - as you say, the predicted eventual spread is 3-4 feet, but at ten years, the spread is predicted at 24-30 inches per plant. If you don't mind waiting till the trees have reached full maturity, you can plant them 3 to 4 feet apart, but if you want the hedge to give full privacy within five years or ...


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