17

Mint does not care for being mowed. If you just assert your ownership of that bit of the lawn, and mow and weed whack as you prefer, eventually it will be less minty. Oregano, in contrast, seems to decide to become a creeping ground cover in the face of endless mowing, which isn't entirely a bad thing. We have fragrant walking paths. Sure, while there are ...


16

After a bit of research, I believe my suspicion was correct. It seems to me that you have Tall Blue Lettuce (Lactuca biennis). Wikipedia article: Lactuca biennis is a North American species of wild lettuce known by the common names tall blue lettuce and blue wood lettuce. It is widespread across much of the United States and Canada from Alaska and Yukon ...


10

Oh boy! I made the same mistake and now mine occupies about 3-4 times the area in the pic on the right here (that was taken last Oct). It's hard to tell if you're really done pulling it out, because the stolons could have propagated quite far. I don't know of an easy way (I doubt there's one...). The approach I'm taking now is to mercilessly cull most of ...


9

Even though I am no type of botanist, I can't resist a good puzzle. So I decided to look into http://www.wildflowersearch.com and came up with "creeping eryngo" or Eryngium prostratum Note those wild looking sepals. Now I do see that Christy B. has already proposed a sea holly, and others thought it couldn't be Eryngium at all because of the ...


8

Just be sure that you plant the right type of honeysuckle! That white/cream colored honeysuckle that you are seeing/smelling everywhere right now is Japanese honeysuckle. It is extremely invasive, and once it is established, is nearly impossible to eradicate. I also live in VA, and have personally seen older roots as big as my wrist. You mentioned birds. ...


7

Virginia creeper. I have this in my backyard. And I had to learn the difference between this and poison ivy as young VC vines have only 3 leaves at the growing end.


7

Firstly, you will probably want to cut the plant off at stump level again. I don't think burning stumps is very effective, or practical. I usually remove the crown, and kill the roots, but there are options. When I deal with this type of thing, I find that I get great results (but use a lot of energy) using a stump grinder and some full-strength glyphosate. ...


6

It sounds like you've got veggies growing in the plot right now? I think then for this season, hand-pulling the mint is your best option. Once the veggies are out, I'd cover the area in sheets of plastic (either black or clear) And secure the edges so it is flat against the ground. It will take several months to kill the mint, but eventually it will be ...


6

It looks likes the beginnings of blue Hobbit stikle


5

Ain't no such animal. Well, Plant. I've looked... Clumping bamboos (cold-climate tolerant) do not grow particularly "large and structural". For that matter, in zone 5, about the best you can hope for IME is "garden stake size" and that's with a running bamboo (Phyllostachys). The big stuff won't survive the winter, and the stuff that will survive the ...


4

I have experienced the same problem where the mint started taking over the raised bed and also started expanding beyond that. I did not want that problem to re-occur so I basically removed all the mint from the roots. So, it involves hard work where you will have to pull out the mint and all the root system. It may take 2-3 attempts because you will ...


4

Oh, dear, I'm sorry to say its a difficult, tedious and time consuming job, but I have done it many times. First you need to cut it right down, then dig each patch, with a bottle of liquid brushwood/stump killer to hand (SBK in the UK, not sure what's available where you are). When you dig, you're digging to expose major and minor roots, and you may need to ...


4

I believe that's Japanese honeysuckle, or Lonicera japonica. It's a very common invasive vine that spreads by the black berries, and by runner above and below ground. Here are pictures of the flowers and berries:


4

It seems a Fraxinus excelior (Ash). It grows fast and it likes stony places (like walls, streets). Young trees sometime have such reddish look (trunk, branches), especially on dry places.


4

That looks like rose growth, most likely off a rootstock; possibly the grafted part of the original rose has died and now just the root stock is left and spreading everywhere. It's entirely separate from the plant or tree with smooth trunks mixed in with it. Which is difficult, because it will be next to impossible to extract all the roots and runners ...


3

Triclopyr + cut stump = dead infestation. My lot was covered with Hell Vine (Trumpet Creeper), Virginia Creeper, and Grapevine when I moved in. Grapevine was easy, Virginia harder because of so many smaller roots, Hell Vine basically roots like a sponge in the ground so I still occasionally get sprouts. Here's my tips: Hunt for a big root. If the root ...


3

Ninety-Five percent sure it's a form of Fleabane (Erigeron annuus), it's in the daisy family, and I let it grow on the margins of my property. It's considered a weed, the public flower garden I weed has a ton of this in the spring.


3

Srihari Yamanoor answered your question perfectly, with excellent references. I too did some research and found nothing to indicate invasiveness with this plant. I know you didn't ask, but just in case you haven't picked out your specific variety yet, here's some information that might help you decide which will work best in your yard. The Emu bush is ...


3

In the end, here's what I did: I hacked it down to a stump again. I poisoned the cut stump with Triclopyr. That killed it stone dead, so I had a guy with a bobcat pull out the stump while he was doing other work on the front yard.


3

In the fall hand pull as much as you can. Every little piece of root grows new plants so tilling just makes thousands of babies. Then mulch with plastic but be aware that if there are any pieces of root left underneath they may spread and grow outside the plastic. I have one type of fuzzy mint that has roots running 3-5 feet under everything in the garden. ...


3

It looks like you may have your work cut out for you. The persistent and perennial nature of mugwort - and its ability to grow whole new plants from tiny sections of its creeping roots, which rules out tilling - makes it tough to control. To do this without chemicals may take a bit of time, and then once cleared, upkeep. To clear the space, I'd remove as ...


3

I don't have a conclusive ID for you, but maybe this will help someone else finish the job. I am convinced this is a member of the Sanguisorba genus. The leaves, sepals, rhizome, and flower head are very consistent with the Greater Burnet (Sanguisorba officinalis), but differs mostly in color and size. It's closer in size to the small burnet (Sanguisorba ...


3

That is not from your blueberry, that's a kind of willow (salix). (I'll do some more research and post possible candidates for a better id later.)


2

One of the best ways is to use a combination of digging it up and then applying only vinegar to anything that shoots up on hot days so the vinegar will soak into the plant


2

Disposal of knotweed is regulated in the UK. The best approach is to see if your neighbour will split the cost of control or removal by a professional contractor. If it is outside a 7m radius of your house you can employ a pesticide-licensed gardener with experience of control - he will have access to glyphosate in strengths not available to lay people, ...


2

If, as I think you said, you're in the UK, talk to your local Council environmental department about it first - they may not deal with it because it's not on public land, but they may be able to give you some advice about what you should do. Second, if you own your house and you have a mortgage with buildings insurance, inform the insurance company and the ...


2

Is there downhill gradient along that fence that leads to an area where the water can be discharged? Dig a ditch to provide drainage, you need to drop the water table. Face the neighbors side with at least 18" of a solid impervious barrier so the rhizomes can't penetrate and then dig the incursion out of your yard. Otherwise as pointed out in the comment ...


2

Why not grow a honeysuckle cousin, Honeyberry (Lonicera caerulea)? With this non-climbing fruiting bush you get flowers in spring followed by tasty edible berries (similar to blueberries). Honeyberries are native to eastern Russia and hardy to -40F (zone 3), but can be grown as far south as USDA hardiness zone 8, so in Virginia I see you having no problem ...


2

Not per Cal-IPC. There is no source more reliable for CA, but you can always call CNPS or Cal-IPC directly. I searched both the genus name and the common name and the database returned nothing. Here it is: http://www.cal-ipc.org/paf/ In addition, UC Davis lists at least one subspecies/variety as a low-water plant: http://publicgarden.ucdavis.edu/...


2

How sure are you that the trifoliate leaves belong to this flower? It's just the flower resembles Pontederia lanceolata, see here https://www.rightplants4me.co.uk/content/plant?PlantID=2830&Pontederia= but that does not have leaves like the ones in your picture, and usually flowers later in the season. Pontederia has the common name of Pickerel weed and ...


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