10

Blueberries have a rudimentary root system that doesn't have the finer root hairs found on most plants. They grow best in forest duff (lots of acidic, organic matter). The acidic nature of the soil causes bacteria and fungi to thrive that release minerals and ammonia that blueberry bushes thrive on and that their roots can readily absorb. In plant root ...


9

A good soil mix for pot grown blueberries is a porous, acidic mix high in organic matter. A good mix could be made by mixing these materials by weight: 5/8 topsoil 2/8 peat moss 1/16 vermiculite 1/16 coarse sand Plus some slow release plant food. To help with the acidity, mix 1/4 pound of aluminum sulfate into the top 6" of soil. There are several mulches ...


9

You can also get blossom drop without fruit forming if the bushes are stressed by a lack of water. It is normal for the blossom to drop after the fruit forms. But if the fruit are not forming, you may have stressed plants.


9

That's weeds, it is some kind of grass. Seedlings of blueberries look more like this (first picture). You can pull the weeds out of there, they compete with nutrients available in the soil.


7

I realize this answer is late -- you should be able to confirm by now -- but this is normal behavior. The flowers fall off and the little bit that is left behind becomes the berry.


7

Blueberries do have slightly varying tastes depending on the variety, but you seem to be suggesting you have several different varieties anyway. The other thing that happens, as they get very ripe, is the taste develops and changes slightly. I'd ask you to collect some of the others which are ripe, but perhaps not quite as ripe as the ones you've already ...


6

Unless you know you bought a specially grafted plant, blueberries grow on their own roots, which means the sucker problem doesn't happen. A sucker is a shoot that grows from below the graft point on a plant which has been grafted to a different rootstock; the sucker is a shoot from that rootstock, and therefore not desirable because it takes over from the ...


6

I've never trellised my berries, personally. I've thought of doing it, but never quite get around to it. If you don't trellis blackberries and raspberries, they kind of sprawl all over and spread to make a thicket in whatever area you are willing to give them. It can make it more difficult (and painful) to pick, but isn't a problem otherwise. I just put on ...


6

The typical answer to yellowing leaves in an acid loving plant is chlorosis due to a lack of available iron caused by a soil ph of over 7. However I find here that soils in Tennessee are mostly acidic and tend to remain at that level due to sulfur from air pollution and existing soil composition. You have already done the right thing by planting in peat ...


6

Amendments for blueberries in the fall. Goldfish pond water is probably good because the organic material in the water lowers the ph some. However blueberries like acidic soil. They grow under the canopies of great trees in the wild which keeps the soil pretty acidic. Blueberries also like lots of water. You want a very loose humus that will dump all the ...


6

Since poorly maintained blueberry bushes can be pruned right to the ground, it's likely your plants will survive their animal pruning. You will need to tidy them up though, and protect them from animal damage in the future. The good thing is you are in the right month in the northern hemisphere to prune. www.fruit.cornell.edu/berry/production/pdfs/...


6

No. It's not a great companion for anything as a growing plant because it grows rapidly and takes up a lot of nitrogen and minerals from the soil as it does. Precisely because it does that, though, Comfrey leaves have their uses; they're often used to make a sort of tea (or sludge, depending) to use as home made fertlizer, or as a 'green manure/mulch' ...


6

One per flower, once the flower is fertilised the white part falls off. The back of the flower, the green part, then starts to swell if fertilised and that turns into your blueberry. I hand pollinate mine with an electric toothbrush for extra crop. If they dry up and drop off once the flower has finished they aren't pollinated. This is my bush that I have ...


6

These are not blueberry stalks for sure. This is probably one of the Panicum plant like Common Millet. You may wait the first seeds to show up to be sure. It will not be long.


5

Can blueberries and raspberries be planted near each other? Yes. I wouldn't plant them on top of each other, but they can be planted next to each other. I routinely have blackberry popping up like weeds in my blueberry stand. if I am watering the blueberries will any acidic fertilizer I give them cause problems for the raspberries? There is a lot of ...


5

Yes, in short. These fruiting plants are not natural bedfellows: Raspberries prefer alkaline soil conditions, so the acidity required to grow blueberries successfully will not suit them. You could plant Blackberries instead of blueberries, they will thrive where raspberries do, and plant the blueberry elsewhere.


5

I'm not entirely clear from your question whether you intend to use your own, home made compost in pots, or whether you're asking about adding something to commercially produced ericaceous potting compost, nor whether you're actually intending to use either of these for pot culture, so this answer may not be entirely appropriate, for it assumes you're making ...


5

Pine needles will not acidify your soil! They are slow to decompose, and even after they do, dead pine needles are pH neutral and thus have no effect on soil pH. It's amazing how many people, including gardening experts, believe this myth! (See Garden Myths-pine needles.) That being said, pine needle mulch is a great mulch for any plants, regardless of ...


5

It's possibly a potassium deficiency. Deficient plants sometimes have yellowing around the leaf edges. Potassium is important for fruit size (so I imagine it could be a factor in fruit development). Too much nitrogen can inhibit potassium. So, be careful about that. On the other hand, it could be a virus of some kind, but my guess is a nutrient imbalance. I ...


5

Blueberries are acid loving plants so depending on your soil ph you may need to amend the soil if it isnt acidic. If you dont know your soil pH then you should get a test kit and test the area where you are going to plant. If your soil pH is neutral to alkaline then you will need to apply sulfur or an amendment that would be used for acid loving plants to ...


5

Standard recommendation for 50 years or more (I have old books) has been to line concrete beds that will be used for acid-loving plants. In days of yore that would have been tar/asphalt type material - these days EDPM rubber (also known as pond liner, also known as rubber roofing) is a somewhat friendlier approach with very long life.


4

You can plant potted blueberry plants in July, but make sure the following conditions are met for best results: Shade. When you plant a new plant in summer, especially a shallow rooted plant like blueberry, provide a light shade on extremely hot, sunny days to prevent drying and sunburn on the new plants. This is only necessary during the first year when ...


4

Blueberry plants don't always flower much the first year, and I usually leave them. However, like strawberry plants, blueberries are establishing a root system during the first year or so, and it is beneficial to remove flowers to divert the energy sources toward something that will benefit the plant. There are some cases where I've had to start pinching ...


4

Somewhat acidic is not nearly acidic enough for blueberries to be happy, for a start - pH between 4 and 5 is the recommended range for them. Bamboo & J. Musser are probably onto something with the drainage, as well. I don't find blueberries particularly troublesome - they do like very acid soil, they are shallow-rooted, and they can be done in by over-...


4

A couple things to check for, aside from the pH levels, would be the Nitrogen and the Nitrates. The Nitrogen content should be fairly high, and the Nitrate content low. It's possible that high nitrates could be causing the burn. Another thing to watch out for, is when you water, don't water the leaves of the plant, as it increases the likeliness of fungus ...


4

Two suggestions: As it seems you are aware blueberries like acid soil, it may be a good idea to check the soil ph and make sure it's correct, the incorrect ph may be causing a nutrient deficiency. It could also be a fungus (which may result indirectly from the incorrect ph). I think the best place to start is by testing the soils ph. These may be useful ...


4

This isn't an answer to the question, but I couldn't leave the issue of aluminum toxicity unaddressed. A few months ago I called my local nursery to ask if they carried ammonium sulfate. He said "Oh, you want aluminum sulfate to acidify the soil for blueberries." I cringed in horror that this advice is being dispensed so regularly. Aluminum is not known ...


4

If you are hand or sprinkler watering, place some empty tuna fish cans in the area. The resulting water standing in the tins will tell you how much you have given. For container plants, check to see that water is draining out 15 minutes later. Never let containers dry out. Small containers may need water every 1-2 days. Use 2" of fine mulch on the top of ...


4

Blueberries have relatively shallow, small root systems. They like consistent moist soil. (They are bog plants) The spacing is dictated more by the tops than by the needed space. Broadly speaking they fall in three size categories: Low bush, high bush, and hybrids. Low bush tend to be under two feet high, with a similar spread. High bush top out ...


4

Test the pH. Blueberries do best with a pH between 4.5 and 5.5. Blueberries are bog plants. They like a soil with lots of organic matter. They are not heavy feeders. More than just a trace of nitrogen will result is lots of lush green leaves, but not many berries. Blueberries are nominally self fertile, but will bear far more heavily if you have a ...


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