28

Although the label might say it's ok to plant again after 2-3 days, do note that different products have different time frames and you should read the label for your product carefully. Even then, you shouldn't trust manufacturer's claims. This article cites a 1993 EPA study showing that glyphosate (Roundup) half-life can persist in agricultural soil for ...


9

Glyphosate needs to be applied while the plants is actively growing and transpiring moisture, which requires sunlight. This means you need to apply glyphosate in the morning so that it will take effect during that day. Glyphosate it deactivated very easily so applying at night, even if it doesn't rain, is likely to be ineffective. So, apply in the morning ...


9

Glyphosate is systemic in action - that means it takes about three weeks to kill a plant, but with the added proviso that it's at its most effective as a weedkiller if applied when weeds are growing strongly rather than when they're slowing down because of the approach of Fall, or because the ground is dry and they're short of water. Well established weeds ...


8

Below are comments (that have now been removed from underneath the original question) I believe contain helpful and useful information that relate directly to the question asked. @wax eagle comment from above: For sure don't use salt. Too much salt will make it so nothing grows. But it also dissolves in water and can therefore travel into areas where you ...


8

To answer your first question, I'm not sure what kind of chemicals store bought roses are usually treated with. Short answer: a lot. These flowers (especially when they're roses) don't really have much room for defects, so pesticides are applied heavily as a preventative, even when there are no symptoms of disease or pests on the plants. Most of these ...


8

The active ingredient of the herbicide used is Dicamba Mecoprop. It also affects broad leaf shrubs and trees. From this pdf by the International Society of Arborists Once the material is absorbed there is no treatment to alleviate the symptoms except to avoid watering and fertilization. Removal of the tree should wait the second year because often a ...


7

2,4-D: 10 days, up to 333 in wet areas. 2,4-D degrades fairly quickly in soils (half-life about 10 days for acid, salt and ester forms), with microbial degradation considered to be the major route in the breakdown of the chemical in soil.It is, however, relatively persistent in anaerobic (low oxygen) aquatic environments (half-life ranges from 41 to 333 ...


7

I don't have personal experience with this. However, when referring to stumps from maples, I have had it suggested to paint roundup onto the stumps. This may require repeated doses. I presume it would work with elms, too. Since you don't have anything else around, you also don't have to worry about the roundup being in the soil for a while to prevent other ...


7

Glyphosate breaks down in normal soil within a few days, or even quicker. It can be rapidly bound to soil particles and be inactivated, unbound glyphosate can be degraded by bacteria. So if your soil is very poor and does not have a good level of active bacteria then the glyphosate may remain active for a lot longer. (Many agricultural soils have ...


7

It does look like wild violets, and they are difficult to eradicate, but triclopyr, or any other lawn weedkiller that purports to kill these, is much more effective used in autumn, see here https://www.thespruce.com/get-rid-of-wild-violets-in-the-lawn-2132476 Even so, you may need to be as persistent as the violets by carrying out repeat treatments.


6

The ETOXNET (Extension Toxology Network) page at Cornell for glyphosate suggests it binds quickly to soil so that run off problems tend to be minor (2% being quoted as typical). Note however you are talking about irrigation ditches, so I would expect run off to be higher - although perhaps not by much if you treat the ditch whilst dry and a few days before ...


6

From pioneer.com: "Foliar absorption of herbicides occurs in a liquid phase only; once a water droplet has dried on the leaf surface and herbicides have crystallized little to no additional absorption occurs. Therefore, any environmental condition speeding the drying of spray droplets on a leaf surface will reduce absorption. Low humidity and high winds can ...


6

Tear off what's there in order to trace it back to its origination, pulling the vines up & out off of the surface & out of the grass. Removing what you can now is safest. Without leaves & actively pumping oil you'll be much more able to contain any oil to your gloves. After that yes, wait for any remnants to sprout & produce leaves before ...


6

I'm sorry to say that its likely most of those methods will work - chopping it all down and covering with black plastic will probably mean you'll have bamboo shoots growing up through the plastic, it'll come through that in no time. Digging it out with machinery might work, if you do it all at once and make sure to get out all roots, no matter how deep they ...


5

I don't know if it works with food thickener, but it does work with wallpaper paste - mix the wallpaper paste powder with straight Round Up or glyphosate only, no water (unless you're using a glyphosate concentrate which needs to be diluted), to the consistency you want. Adding a wetting agent might help too if you're using plain glyphosate, (in the UK, a ...


5

It is difficult to answer the question of whether or not it is safe to eat dandelions or other plants that have been treated with this herbicide. You'd have to know how much iron the plant has actually absorbed in the part you intend to eat and whether that amount of iron would harm you. The main ingredient is chelated iron. Chelated iron is sometimes ...


5

It depends to some extent what you mean by 'clover'. White clover or Dutch clover (Trifolium repens) and red clover (Trifolium pratense) are very susceptible to treatments containing dicamba, dichlorprop-P and mecoprop-P, or 2,4-D and mecoprop-P. Other, clover like lawn weeds are more susceptible to formulations containing fluroxpyr, MCPA and clopyralid, ...


5

The usual method is to pour glyphosate down the hollow stalks,not sure how well the one you mention will do. Repeat and ongoing treatments are necessary,but one other thing - if you're going to cut down any of this plant, don't compost it, don't carry it anywhere without bagging it up first, and if you can, burn it, if not, where you are, it should be ...


5

That particular herbicide is known as a HPPD inhibitor. It works by blocking an enzyme in the plants. The plants normally break down a particular amino acid (tyrosine) and use the components to build other needed substances. I'm guessing that normal lawn grasses get their nutrition via a different method, so blocking that enzyme doesn't effect them. ...


5

Because of the variability of the environmental fate of this chemical, which shows different decay/leaching rates in different soil textures/environments, you cannot get a direct answer such as "This product will have dissipated in x days". Studies have shown that acidic soil will not bind with Copper(II) sulfate near as much as soils that are closer to ...


4

Triclopyr is considered to be one of the more toxic pesticides. California has stricter environmental laws than most states, especially when it comes to carcinogens. http://www.alternatives2toxics.org/tox_profile-triclopyr.htmhttp://www.alternatives2toxics.org/tox_profile-triclopyr.htm


4

You could use corn gluten meal to control weeds. It is a germination inhibitor that lets the grass grow while keeping out the weeds. However, don't put down corn gluten meal when you sow the grass seed, because it will inhibit germination there, which is exactly the wrong thing. Wait until the grass comes up!


4

There are a lot of factors - species, amount of exposure, etc. There's a good chance some will survive. Whilst killing ivy with this, I managed to kill the ivy and a small elm tree (the tree should not have had over spray, but perhaps surface roots did) - but cacti and some lawn weeds in the area survived just fine! If it is a concern then I would try to ...


4

Having checked the question on Pets.SE, you seem to want to know when it will be safe for rabbits to graze the treated area. As with all liquid lawn weedkillers, once the spray or solution has dried, it's safe for animals and children to use the lawn, though 24 hours elapse is safest. For grazing animals though, it is not safe if that is their only food ...


4

Glyphosate is a systemic herbicide. It really only needs a few hours to get into the plant before a rain. It is not a quick killer in basic formulation, but absent resistance, it kills the whole plant. Farmers started using it in the 70s using contact applicators to brush it onto Johnsongrass. Roundup would take a week to kill it, but it got it all, down to ...


4

Glyphosate pesticides (most notably, Roundup) are supoosed to be sprayed on the leaves; plants translocate the glyphosate into the root. However, I've found that poison ivy is realtively difficult to control with glyphosate pesticide. But, glyphosate is still the go-to solution as far as over-the-counter herbicides are concerned. Generally speaking, the ...


4

It's hard to tell from the picture, but I think that may be a tree of heaven that sprouted there. If that's the case if you just cut it to the ground it will come back over and over again but if you keep cutting it back it will eventually die. Like stormy suggested, that's what I would do. If you don't want the hassle, I think that painting the freshly ...


4

This Monsanto page says that it depends on the strength of the product used. For the product used on perennial weeds, wait 72 hours. Glyphosate is a contact killer that is taken up by the leaves, and then taken down into the roots. It's supposed to be safe anyway in that there are no mammalian metabolic pathways that can be affected by this chemical. ...


4

It's Stellaria media, commonly known as Chickweed and its an annual (dies in winter). It's very easy to dig out, but the difficulty is the amount of seed it produces IF you have allowed it to flower; it germinates easily, meaning ongoing weeding in successive years. https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=1011 If you don't want to use anything toxic (and ...


3

As a followup, I tried my idea, and it worked quite well. The reason for this post is to point out that you can get away with .75% glyphosate on most weeds. I also used some pre-mixed glufosinate on some Canada thistles, and applied similarly, with success. Also, @Bamboo's idea, using wall paper paste, works well too.


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