21

The size of the tomato has been increased with human selection. Wild tomatoes are berry sized, so the plant doesn't need extra support. The same is true for most plants that humans have selectively bred, although for tomatoes, the plant is not fibrous or tough enough to bear much weight. Genetic engineering has come a long way, but it will be a while before ...


19

This is a daffodil or Narcissus. It has a bulb so it will come back every year.


11

That is Claytonia perfoliata, known as Miner's Lettuce in the US. It's often used as a salad green in winter lettuce mixes. It's extraordinarily cold hardy. Not much flavor though (at least in my opinion).


9

Even though I am no type of botanist, I can't resist a good puzzle. So I decided to look into http://www.wildflowersearch.com and came up with "creeping eryngo" or Eryngium prostratum Note those wild looking sepals. Now I do see that Christy B. has already proposed a sea holly, and others thought it couldn't be Eryngium at all because of the ...


9

This is a poppy - a Papaver. Note the four petals and in the center of the flowers the characteristic thick ovaries with the crown-shaped top. Later, the dried capsule will open at the crown and release the seeds. The leaf rosette on the ground and the hairy stems are also characteristic. Depending on where you live, you may be more familiar with the common ...


8

I think this could be a common thistle, judging by the purple flower and spikes. The Wikipedia article on it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cirsium I don't know the answer to the last two questions though.


8

I think it could be a baby conifer tree. Those seem to have multiple bright green cotelydons and look sort of like that. I found a couple of pictures on the internet that didn't look exactly like the one you have, but had a certain resemblance, and there are certainly lots of different conifers out there. These are Douglas fir cotelydons, picture from ...


8

What a nice gesture of this animal hospital, sorry to hear about your loss. The best way to keep these seeds is in a dry and cool environment. So not in the fridge (too much moist), and not above the radiator/heater (too hot). If you have a cupboard for storage (is that called a pantry? I am non-native English speaker), that would be the ideal place. The ...


7

@stormy, @Niall C. Thank you! This looks like it: Swertia angustifolia The 'frasera' identification was a big help.After that, it was just a matter of hunting. Thank you so much both for the identification and for introducing me to a beguiling group of plants


6

I think its Salvia lyrata, a native in the USA, mostly in the Eastern parts, but technically its a woodland plant and considered a wildflower http://www.backyardnature.net/n/h/lyresage.htm


6

It looks like it is Salvia lyrata.


6

I think this is pregnant onion, Albuca bracteata.


6

Looks like Lunaria annua (Honesty, Money Plant, etc.).


6

It's a daisy fleabane, Erigeron sp.. My best guess is Robin's plantain, E. pulchellus, at least if you live in eastern North America. It's native there, and a very common "weed" of semi-disturbed areas, but it also is common in moist-ish open to moderately closed woods.


6

Apparently I only needed one more Google search after posting this question. I finally found a page showing a similar flower, identifying it as a Hippobroma longiflora (commonly called a Star of Bethlehem). Googling again for that scientific name I was able to find plenty of examples that confirmed this identification. Photos credits George Shepherd, Dinesh ...


6

It's a mountain heath or heather, Phyllodoce empetriformis, a native perennial shrubby plant which has,variously, pale pink to deep pink to, occasionally, mauve-pink bell shaped flowers throughout summer. Classed as an alpine or sub alpine plant, likes acid soil conditions and prefers damp soil http://www.flora.dempstercountry.org/0.Site.Folder/Species....


6

I thought of doing the same on a piece of land I own. I thought a lot about it, and now I finally got the chance of building a new house on that property. So what I'm thinking now is I'll wait after the digging machines are done with their job, wait they put back the earth in place and put the seed afterwards. I tried it on someone else property where I ...


6

I was initially going to suggest Shasta Daisy Leucanthemum x superbum, however the leaves are not typical of that variety. I believe your suggestion of Oxeye Daisy / Leucanthemum vulgare is accurate.


6

It looks likes the beginnings of blue Hobbit stikle


6

The term 'wood violet' is somewhat vague - this is actually one of the Oxalis varieties, so not a Viola at all; it's probably Oxalis latifolia, maybe Oxalis violacaea, often commonly known as wood sorrel (in the UK anyway). The easily identified foliage is not actually visible in the photograph with your question. Image of Oxalis latifolia here, but it's a ...


6

Here you can see Lily of the Valley (left) and Wild garlic (right) in the same photo. As you can see, Lily of the Valley usually has two leafs, one wrapping the other on the stem, while Wild garlic only has one leaf. Image found at Landleys kök (in Swedish).


5

It's said to derive from a British poem (which has also been described as a song) by John Gay, titled 'Black Eyed Susan'. The poem also refers to 'sweet william', which is possibly also the origin of the common name for Dianthus barbatus. Sounds like folklore to me - black eyed susan refers to the almost black eye in the centre of the flower. Why susan, who ...


5

It's true about host plants - but they might not always be ones you actually want. Nettles are a host plant in the UK for two different butterflies, but I can't say I'm all that thrilled at having nettles in the garden, and they tend to prefer large patches of nettles to just one or two plants. It's probably much easier to settle for providing plants which ...


5

Looks like one of the naturalized strains of Perilla frutescens. Perilla frutescens has been widely naturalized in parts of the United States and Canada, from Texas and Florida north to Connecticut and into Ontario, and west to Nebraska. It can be weedy or invasive in some of these regions. It certainly is a weed here, and although it is edible, I find ...


5

Update: Based on OP's comment about the leaves, it is possible, the tree is Senna alata I believe this beautiful specimen is Cryptochilus lutea. Look it up online and see if that jogs your memory. Were there green tendrils off to one side of the plant? Do you have any other pictures?


5

It's one of the Polygonums (previously Persicaria, and still listed as such in many references) not entirely sure which, most pics on line are of cultivated varieties, and wild ones are quite variable in appearance, but likely its Polygonum lapathifolium. These plants are not notorious for causing allergic responses, but every individual is different, and ...


5

None of these pictures show ragweed. These are all goldenrod. Goldenrod can be allergenic but has pollen too heavy to be carried by wind and is very much unlikely a culprit of hay fever. Ragweed has dissected, feathery leaves and less showy flowers than these. Alas, even if you pulled all the ragweed in your yard (if you had it) it would not help ...


5

It's a speedwell, most likely slender speedwell or Veronica filiformis; it is a common lawn weed in Europe, along with one or two other similar ones, V. chaemedrys, V. serpyllifolia and V. hederifolia. Slender speedwell is a highly invasive plant and is not usually planted in borders because it's difficult to control; this is also true of the others ...


4

If the plant you have is Leontopodium alpinum, the latin name for Edelweiss, these plants like full sun, gritty, alkaline soil, and that oh so difficult to achieve moist, but free draining soil conditions. In other words, they don't like their roots to dry out, but must not be waterlogged. They're relatively shortlived plants, but can be divided in early ...


4

Oh my...you ARE learning the hard way! Just moving a plant from the nursery to its new home is stressful (for the plant)! You have no way to know if the nursery took the time to 'harden' the plant before putting it outside in the sun. It was probably grown in a greenhouse and your nursery thought they looked so nice everyone should see them right away. ...


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