11

Your best bet is probably to pour boiling water on the weeds. The heat will kill the plants, and the water will of course be harmless to the birds as soon as it cools. Just be careful not to burn yourself!


10

With those long underground rhizomes (the thick white runners you see) and upright growth this appears to be quackgrass (Elymus repens). Unfortunately, controlling it isn't much easier with that bit of knowledge. Quackgrass is a tough competitor. There are no selective herbicides that can kill it without killing the lawn grass, and as you've discovered ...


9

Glyphosate breaks down in normal soil within a few days, or even quicker. It can be rapidly bound to soil particles and be inactivated, unbound glyphosate can be degraded by bacteria. So if your soil is very poor and does not have a good level of active bacteria then the glyphosate may remain active for a lot longer. (Many agricultural soils have few ...


9

Vinegar acts as a desiccant. It dissolves the protective coating on the leaves of the plant causing it to dry out and die if the temperatures are warm enough. It usually doesn't destroy the roots and sometimes the plant may come back if there is enough energy in the root system. Dandelions have a large taproot which makes them difficult to kill with ...


9

Your strawberry and veggie patches are almost done for the year where you live, so it seems to me it would be best to tackle them next spring. For now, I would cut down the weeds as close to the ground as possible, but not worry about getting rid of them altogether. In the spring, when the strawberries (and weeds) start coming back, you'll be able to hand ...


9

I'm in the UK, and we don't have poison ivy, oak nor sumach, so I've never actually seen them. However, the small leaved plant covering the ground in between the Hosta leaves and the one with palmate leaves appears to be Vinca minor, common name lesser periwinkle, usually has blue flowers in spring. The palmate leaved plant looks like Parthenocissus, or ...


8

From pioneer.com: "Foliar absorption of herbicides occurs in a liquid phase only; once a water droplet has dried on the leaf surface and herbicides have crystallized little to no additional absorption occurs. Therefore, any environmental condition speeding the drying of spray droplets on a leaf surface will reduce absorption. Low humidity and high winds can ...


8

Some years ago I apparently eradicated bindweed from a small (15 x 7 feet) unenclosed front garden adjacent to the parking lot. I lived on an Estate where a number of small, bored children were always looking for something to do - so I offered a small bounty to the child who dug out the most convolvulus roots. The game was played every Sunday and roots had ...


8

Composting Pros: germicide. Cons: it take times, some clover seeds can germinate after composting and it is not suitable for large gardens. Herbicides (Postemergent) Pros: As per @J. Musser 's suggestion > quick; especially on rocky and hard soil. Cons: all derivated from herbicide use and clovers may regrow. Herbicides (Preemergent ) Pros: quick method ...


8

You must not use Scotts Weed and Feed formulation now for two reasons - one, you've already applied a weedkiller to the entire lawn, and one of the active ingredients, 2,4D, is present in both formulations, which means you'll be overdosing on the weedkiller front. Second, where you live, your first frost date is early October, so feed should not be applied ...


8

The active ingredient of the herbicide used is Dicamba Mecoprop. It also affects broad leaf shrubs and trees. From this pdf by the International Society of Arborists Once the material is absorbed there is no treatment to alleviate the symptoms except to avoid watering and fertilization. Removal of the tree should wait the second year because often a ...


8

Read the label of the product you are using. The label will state a re-entry interval. Without the label we don't know what is in the specific spray you are using, so we can't give a proper answer.


8

Since wild parsnip is a biennial, when I owned a couple of acres I would just wait for it to set seed, then snip the seedheads off into a five-gallon pail and burn them. I did the same for Queen Anne's Lace. This actually worked fairly well; I was able to drastically reduce the numbers of both species over a couple of years. Interestingly, it seems to me ...


7

Edge your lawn by digging a trench. The edges should be defined as perfectly straight or if you are doing curves, keep the radius consistent until you change directions. If you use a string and stake, the stake is the center of your circle. That radius stays the same until you have to move the stake either outside your lawn or back onto the lawn. Doesn't ...


7

I've effectively killed it with a 20% horticultural vinegar using a pump sprayer. The grass around it will look like it died but actually goes dormant like it does in a drought. If you water it the day after you spray the vinegar, it will turn green. With the ground ivy, you have to be vigilant because if you leave one runner...the problem comes back. A ...


7

Since some perennial weeds can regenerate from even tiny root fragments, they are not considered safe for composting unless you use the Berkeley method of hot composting, and measure the temperature to ensure that your compost temperature is within bounds as prescribed by that method. Another way to treat perennial weeds is to dry them out to kill the roots ...


7

The top image is of Carolina Mallow (Modiola caroliniana) and the bottom picture is of Cudweed (Gamochaeta americana).


7

Thatch is an accumulation of dead organic debris that has not yet been decomposed that builds up between the soil and live grasses. St. Augustine is known for thatch buildup. This buildup blocks water penetration and nutrients. If you can see a 'mat' below your grass and above your soil that is 1" or more you need to use a power rake or manual rake to rip ...


7

If the methods described above aren't any you want to do, there is something else to try, but again, it's not a quick, easy solution - it requires determination and persistence. This plant here in the UK has the common name of ground elder, and it is indeed a pernicious weed, but it is possible to get rid of it for good, other than the odd seedling that may ...


7

Firstly, you will probably want to cut the plant off at stump level again. I don't think burning stumps is very effective, or practical. I usually remove the crown, and kill the roots, but there are options. When I deal with this type of thing, I find that I get great results (but use a lot of energy) using a stump grinder and some full-strength glyphosate. ...


7

2,4-D: 10 days, up to 333 in wet areas. 2,4-D degrades fairly quickly in soils (half-life about 10 days for acid, salt and ester forms), with microbial degradation considered to be the major route in the breakdown of the chemical in soil.It is, however, relatively persistent in anaerobic (low oxygen) aquatic environments (half-life ranges from 41 to 333 ...


7

Mulch is commonly used to control weeds, as it sounds like you've discovered on your own. Since you have a bad infestation you could use cardboard (or layered newspaper) with wood chips on top to prevent any weeds from seeing the light of day. Use cardboard without glossy paint, and be sure to poke some holes in it to allow water to drain through. Spread it ...


7

The first photo is pokeweed, Phytolacca americana, a perennial plant native to North America. I would not recommend you eat this plant unless you know exactly how to prepare it to remove it's toxins. I like this plant as an ornamental myself. The second and, I believe third photo, is spiny sow thistle, Sonchus Asper, and annual or biennial (sometimes a '...


7

Soil solarisation is the process of using a green house effect with plastic to kill some pathogens and weeds in the first 6 inches layer of soil. It also helps break down organic materials on the surface making them more available to plants. Clear PV resistant plastic is used in hot regions to allow greater transmission of solar radiation to the soil, and ...


7

Don't use paint! Any paint has binders and adhesives, so it will tend to clog your sprayer, and (as you note) you can't be sure what the interaction of the various ingredients will be with the active ingredients in your weed killer. Besides which, very little of paint is actually dye or pigment. There are a number of dyes designed specifically for mixing ...


7

It does look like wild violets, and they are difficult to eradicate, but triclopyr, or any other lawn weedkiller that purports to kill these, is much more effective used in autumn, see here https://www.thespruce.com/get-rid-of-wild-violets-in-the-lawn-2132476 Even so, you may need to be as persistent as the violets by carrying out repeat treatments.


7

You have hairy bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta) in your garden. This plant very often comes as "hitchhiker" with newly bought plants. It is a very prolific seeder and can bring even two generations in one year, the first in spring, when the overwintering plants set seeds, one in late summer, like you are observing now. The main problem is actually ...


7

Yes, but you must be smarter than a doctor or engineer: some of the richest are php engineers. It is mainly economy: if there are many people that could do something, they will fight to produce it for less, the price will be low. So to have high gain you need something unique or seldom. Often this could be a terroir (just a piece of land in a well named ...


7

15x30 feet with the sort of weed density you are showing? - Take an hour and pull them out by hand, or with a hoe. If you notice a lot of root penetration below or between the under-fabric you might want to rake back the surface and lay additional fabric, but I'd bet you mostly have weeds growing in the "rubberized play impact surface" itself and whatever ...


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