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Identifying crabgrass: Video: Will the REAL Crabgrass Please Stand Up? from University of Illinois Extension Personally, I pretty much follow all the advice given in this brilliant article: Organic Lawn Care For the Cheap and Lazy So far, the advice given in that article hasn't totally prevented my crabgrass problem. I'm still battling crabgrass, ...


28

Although the label might say it's ok to plant again after 2-3 days, do note that different products have different time frames and you should read the label for your product carefully. Even then, you shouldn't trust manufacturer's claims. This article cites a 1993 EPA study showing that glyphosate (Roundup) half-life can persist in agricultural soil for ...


22

Yes, salt will kill plants. In theory, if you use enough of it in the soil, it will kill a tree. Regarding whether its permanent, no, its not. If you saturate open ground with salt, everything dies, and, by and large, nothing grows for some months, even years. In your case, you want to know whether it works permanently when its been applied to paving. No, ...


21

That is annual bluegrass, Poa annua. It grows in lawns during the spring (and/or fall, depending on climate) and causes some very nice lawns to thin out, as it grows very thick and chokes out the lawn grass. The problem with removing it is that this is a grass itself, so you cannot kill it with selective weed killer. This site gives good information on the ...


19

There are several ways of removing these dandelions from your lawn: If you have a cool-season lawn and are happy to take the chemical route, you could use a selective weedkiller containing 2,4-D or MCPP, such as Trimec, Speedzone or Momentum, which are best applied in mid-spring or early fall You could hand-weed using this tool which has received excellent ...


17

Mint does not care for being mowed. If you just assert your ownership of that bit of the lawn, and mow and weed whack as you prefer, eventually it will be less minty. Oregano, in contrast, seems to decide to become a creeping ground cover in the face of endless mowing, which isn't entirely a bad thing. We have fragrant walking paths. Sure, while there are ...


16

Personally, I hate weed whackers. They're terrible at my house: the places I need to weed are either next to plants that can't get whacked, or they're next to wire fencing that chews through tons of string, or they're next to rocks that chew through tons of string. My preferred tool for getting in next to the fences, lilies, and trees is a pair of manual ...


15

Do not let them go to seed! (Info from Purdue University) Common ragweed plants allowed to grow for the entire growing season can produce 32,000 to 62,000 seeds per plant. But if you don't have time for all that hoeing, consider that you may want to be lazy later in the season: Plants that emerge mid-April through May can produce up to three ...


14

It's Euphorbia maculata (or a closely related species), commonly known as Prostrate Spurge or Spotted Spurge. More images from Google here. It forms a tap root, so it's fairly easy to control by hand; my technique is to find all the branches radiating from one central stem, them grasp the stem just below the branching point and pull straight up. I've also ...


14

I have been using salt to control my neighbor's bamboo for 5 years now. He planted a 200 foot line of bamboo with no intention of controlling it. I had to trench my own yard for 200+ feet and lay in a barrier 3 feet off the property line. (After I removed over 100 feet of roots destroying my yard). Then to keep the plants from filling in from the barrier ...


13

Think twice, no three times before planting English Ivy. It is considered an invasive species in the US, and on the "noxious species" list of 46 States. Basically, plant that stuff and you risk it becoming a much bigger problem than any weed problem you have at the moment! Garden centers should be shot for stocking that stuff. Sorry, had to say that! ...


12

Credit for this answer goes to my mum. When we (wife and I) moved into our current home 4 years ago, the front and back lawns were covered in dandelions (and other broadleaf weeds). I didn't want to go the herbicide route, and after speaking with my mum, she said the only way to truly get rid of (control) dandelions is to hand remove them (important: you ...


11

You need to keep your grass healthy to help combat ground ivy. Water deeply and infrequently and fertilize properly. Have a soil test done at your local cooperative extension to see if there are any issues you need to correct and how much fertilizer you need to add. Ground ivy thrives in damp and insufficiently fertilized soils. There have been university ...


11

It looks like a type of fleabane. I'd say hairy fleabane, yet it is an annual and you mention it spreading by rhizomes. I suggest you check with Utah Pests http://utahpests.usu.edu/uppdl/. For only $7, they can ID it for you and tell you how to control it. Deal!


11

Your best bet is probably to pour boiling water on the weeds. The heat will kill the plants, and the water will of course be harmless to the birds as soon as it cools. Just be careful not to burn yourself!


10

I will recommend two excellent (at least I think they are) low level ground covers, that I have personal experience with (have both of them in my garden), they: Love sun. In the heat of summer (MO, USA: 90°F to 115°F / 32°C to 46°C) they do best if given a good drink of water once a week. Neither of them need to be trimmed. From what I ...


10

I have recently acquired a weed torch, which allows me to kill weeds without chemicals. It is essentially a blow torch run by propane. I would recommend the same model I am using http://www.amazon.com/Red-Dragon-VT-2-23-000-BTU/dp/B00004Z2FP/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1315411041&sr=8-2 You have to be careful around the fruit trees, but the cone of heat ...


10

This site indicates you have a major problem that will require large amounts of effort no matter what method you choose. You can hand pull while you are wearing gloves and try to get the root. This could take years if you have open soil and moist conditions. If this was my weed I would write off the plants around it. Cut everything down, remove and lay ...


10

Something not suggested: sheet mulching for "lasagna" gardening. A local department store will probably give you 4,500 sqft of cardboard boxes for free -- they may even deliver them! De-tape and de-staple them, break them down, and put them over everything you want to kill. Put a bit of topsoil on the cardboard to hold it down. The cardboard will eventually ...


10

It's thistles. You're probably doing the right thing - just keep at it. This time of year, weeds can seem unbeatable. The main thing is to loosen the soil out about a foot from a big thistle, with a gardening fork or similar. Then try to get all the roots in one go with a spade, or by pulling. With little ones that regrew from little roots you missed, ...


10

Oh boy! I made the same mistake and now mine occupies about 3-4 times the area in the pic on the right here (that was taken last Oct). It's hard to tell if you're really done pulling it out, because the stolons could have propagated quite far. I don't know of an easy way (I doubt there's one...). The approach I'm taking now is to mercilessly cull most of ...


10

We own a tool that looks just like the one on the right here: I used it just last week - it's good for goldenrod, raspberries, oregano and the like. After a round with this the mower can handle it. Instructions for using it are at the American Trails site, among other places. We own a gas powered trimmer, but this is actually quicker (and lighter and ...


10

Ooh, dear, sorry AvieRose, that's because there isn't a once and for all solution. Bindweed is practically impossible to eradicate, as you've discovered, so all you can hope for is to keep it in check. In light soils, it's often possible to extract the bulk of any root material when the area is unplanted, but in clay or heavy soils, it's much harder because, ...


10

I'm pretty sure this is Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris), an invasive but non-toxic weed, not Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Differences between the two include: Leaf structure: Cow Parsley's leaves are fernlike, Giant Hogweed's leaves are much larger and coarser: Cow parsley leaves Giant Hogweed leaves: Height: Cow Parsley grows to about ...


9

yes, that is poison ivy, although it is difficult to see the distinctive compound leaf from your photo, you can tell by the distinctive twigs, especially the pronounced bud-scars (where the leaves attach) and berries: The picture in tho OP may have been confusing to some because there is also another plant with a compound leaf on the right, perhaps (winged,...


9

Q. Can I change the conditions to suit the mondo grass more than the pennywort and give it a better chance? A. Mondo grass (is an Ornamental grass, this is important for the herbicide part of the answer), prefers a moist soil. Pennywort thrives in wet soils. Therefore if you can reduce the moisture level in your soil you will (to some extent) hit negatively ...


9

From the shape of the leaves and the smooth, glossy texture of the leaves, I would say it's some kind of Holly. Or it could be something like: Oregon grape (Mahonia aquifolium) False holly (Osmanthus heterophyllus) The secret of pulling any weed (plant) out of the ground (root and all) is to soak (via a garden hose) the ground really well beforehand, or ...


9

I'm not an arborist but my approach would be to cut it back as far as a possible, then to saw the trunk close to the ground. Paint a brush-b-gon (woody plant) type weed killer on the freshly cut surface. If the weed killer does not work and it starts sprouting, I have successfully killed tree stumps by drilling holes in the top and then pouring a copper ...


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