23

Yes, salt will kill plants. In theory, if you use enough of it in the soil, it will kill a tree. Regarding whether its permanent, no, its not. If you saturate open ground with salt, everything dies, and, by and large, nothing grows for some months, even years. In your case, you want to know whether it works permanently when its been applied to paving. No, ...


14

I have been using salt to control my neighbor's bamboo for 5 years now. He planted a 200 foot line of bamboo with no intention of controlling it. I had to trench my own yard for 200+ feet and lay in a barrier 3 feet off the property line. (After I removed over 100 feet of roots destroying my yard). Then to keep the plants from filling in from the barrier ...


12

Glyphosate needs to be applied while the plants is actively growing and transpiring moisture, which requires sunlight. This means you need to apply glyphosate in the morning so that it will take effect during that day. Glyphosate it deactivated very easily so applying at night, even if it doesn't rain, is likely to be ineffective. So, apply in the morning ...


11

You need to keep your grass healthy to help combat ground ivy. Water deeply and infrequently and fertilize properly. Have a soil test done at your local cooperative extension to see if there are any issues you need to correct and how much fertilizer you need to add. Ground ivy thrives in damp and insufficiently fertilized soils. There have been university ...


11

Your best bet is probably to pour boiling water on the weeds. The heat will kill the plants, and the water will of course be harmless to the birds as soon as it cools. Just be careful not to burn yourself!


10

Ooh, dear, sorry AvieRose, that's because there isn't a once and for all solution. Bindweed is practically impossible to eradicate, as you've discovered, so all you can hope for is to keep it in check. In light soils, it's often possible to extract the bulk of any root material when the area is unplanted, but in clay or heavy soils, it's much harder because, ...


10

I'm pretty sure this is Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris), an invasive but non-toxic weed, not Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Differences between the two include: Leaf structure: Cow Parsley's leaves are fernlike, Giant Hogweed's leaves are much larger and coarser: Cow parsley leaves Giant Hogweed leaves: Height: Cow Parsley grows to about ...


10

With those long underground rhizomes (the thick white runners you see) and upright growth this appears to be quackgrass (Elymus repens). Unfortunately, controlling it isn't much easier with that bit of knowledge. Quackgrass is a tough competitor. There are no selective herbicides that can kill it without killing the lawn grass, and as you've discovered ...


9

The clover (assuming white clover) is spreading on its own because, most likely, the soil is low on nitrogen, which favors the clover instead of the grass. Clover can fix nitrogen from the air, so it thrives in the low-N soil where other things have a hard time competing with it. According to this: Do legumes provide nitrogen to their companions? Clover ...


9

Vinegar acts as a desiccant. It dissolves the protective coating on the leaves of the plant causing it to dry out and die if the temperatures are warm enough. It usually doesn't destroy the roots and sometimes the plant may come back if there is enough energy in the root system. Dandelions have a large taproot which makes them difficult to kill with ...


9

Your strawberry and veggie patches are almost done for the year where you live, so it seems to me it would be best to tackle them next spring. For now, I would cut down the weeds as close to the ground as possible, but not worry about getting rid of them altogether. In the spring, when the strawberries (and weeds) start coming back, you'll be able to hand ...


9

I'm in the UK, and we don't have poison ivy, oak nor sumach, so I've never actually seen them. However, the small leaved plant covering the ground in between the Hosta leaves and the one with palmate leaves appears to be Vinca minor, common name lesser periwinkle, usually has blue flowers in spring. The palmate leaved plant looks like Parthenocissus, or ...


8

From pioneer.com: "Foliar absorption of herbicides occurs in a liquid phase only; once a water droplet has dried on the leaf surface and herbicides have crystallized little to no additional absorption occurs. Therefore, any environmental condition speeding the drying of spray droplets on a leaf surface will reduce absorption. Low humidity and high winds can ...


8

Some years ago I apparently eradicated bindweed from a small (15 x 7 feet) unenclosed front garden adjacent to the parking lot. I lived on an Estate where a number of small, bored children were always looking for something to do - so I offered a small bounty to the child who dug out the most convolvulus roots. The game was played every Sunday and roots had ...


8

They look like small Asparagus spears. The triangular leaves (like scales) on the stem and the slightly swollen tips of the stems are the characteristics that helped that identification. An image search for "Asparagus+spears" will provide lots of other photos for comparison. Wikipedia says that they're native to your region (Iran), and that it even gets ...


8

One should always address the soil before tackling weed and plant issues. I'm a firm believer that good soil = healthy plants = few diseases and little need for chemicals. Every plant has a place in which it likes to grow, due to soil composition and climate. Once we understand and accept this principle, its a matter of deciding how to modify conditions ...


8

Composting Pros: germicide. Cons: it take times, some clover seeds can germinate after composting and it is not suitable for large gardens. Herbicides (Postemergent) Pros: As per @J. Musser 's suggestion > quick; especially on rocky and hard soil. Cons: all derivated from herbicide use and clovers may regrow. Herbicides (Preemergent ) Pros: quick method ...


8

You must not use Scotts Weed and Feed formulation now for two reasons - one, you've already applied a weedkiller to the entire lawn, and one of the active ingredients, 2,4D, is present in both formulations, which means you'll be overdosing on the weedkiller front. Second, where you live, your first frost date is early October, so feed should not be applied ...


8

The active ingredient of the herbicide used is Dicamba Mecoprop. It also affects broad leaf shrubs and trees. From this pdf by the International Society of Arborists Once the material is absorbed there is no treatment to alleviate the symptoms except to avoid watering and fertilization. Removal of the tree should wait the second year because often a ...


8

Read the label of the product you are using. The label will state a re-entry interval. Without the label we don't know what is in the specific spray you are using, so we can't give a proper answer.


8

Since wild parsnip is a biennial, when I owned a couple of acres I would just wait for it to set seed, then snip the seedheads off into a five-gallon pail and burn them. I did the same for Queen Anne's Lace. This actually worked fairly well; I was able to drastically reduce the numbers of both species over a couple of years. Interestingly, it seems to me ...


7

Edge your lawn by digging a trench. The edges should be defined as perfectly straight or if you are doing curves, keep the radius consistent until you change directions. If you use a string and stake, the stake is the center of your circle. That radius stays the same until you have to move the stake either outside your lawn or back onto the lawn. Doesn't ...


7

Glyphosate breaks down in normal soil within a few days, or even quicker. It can be rapidly bound to soil particles and be inactivated, unbound glyphosate can be degraded by bacteria. So if your soil is very poor and does not have a good level of active bacteria then the glyphosate may remain active for a lot longer. (Many agricultural soils have ...


7

I've effectively killed it with a 20% horticultural vinegar using a pump sprayer. The grass around it will look like it died but actually goes dormant like it does in a drought. If you water it the day after you spray the vinegar, it will turn green. With the ground ivy, you have to be vigilant because if you leave one runner...the problem comes back. A ...


7

You can kill ivy with storm windows/glass. I got rid of a big patch after all else failed with several 4'x6' storm windows. I laid the glass out on the ivy and it fried it in a couple hours. I moved the windows around for a week and killed a 30 foot x 45 foot area of ivy. Cook it and kill it.


7

I disagree with advice about dethatching. In healthy cool season lawns this is not a problem. If you have excessive thatch it is because of the following: Excessive growth caused by over-fertilization and heavy watering; Infrequent mowing that creates long clippings; Heavy, compacted soils; Unfavorable soil conditions that interfere with ...


7

The top image is of Carolina Mallow (Modiola caroliniana) and the bottom picture is of Cudweed (Gamochaeta americana).


7

Definitely start with a soil test. You mention that the soil is black, rich, but artificial fertilizers and many pesticides can lead to biologically poor soil. Without good soil biology, much of the nutrients you dump on your lawn remains unavailable to grass. If you can afford it, get a bioassay done (like that from http://soilfoodwebnewyork.com/ but from ...


7

The only thing I want to add... You are fighting 2 battles, one against the plants, one against the seeds. You must never let it seed, or your eradication will be delayed by years. You should fight a pitched battle against a small area , maybe 20m by 10m for a year or 2, then advance. For the plants in my area, the main problem is that are dormant while I ...


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