We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
12

You don't mention where you are located, but here in Central Florida, I've been able to take out incredibly invasive, persistent, and prolific sprout-from-the-trunks plants by covering it and sealing it down in thick, black plastic. I use 3 mil contractor clean-up bags cut open into one large sheet. On even mildly-warm days, I've measured it at over 140°F (...


10

I would paint brush-b-gon (or a similar small tree weedkiller) on the stumps after cutting them back. Using an old paint brush means the treatment is highly localized and does not affect neighboring plants, etc. This is the approach used by many ecological groups when removing invasive bushes. Incidentally, davidii amounts to an invasive in the UK, where ...


10

This is one job that I get to do quite often each year. Grass doesn't grow as well in wood chips as it does in topsoil, so be prepared for some digging. I find that a pitchfork is often easier to use than a spade shovel. Tree stumps often have a surprisingly high quantity of chips once ground out. Be prepared to take more than an hours work on just this part....


8

Updated September 2015 Where is it found This pdf shows where Emerald Ash borer is found in the United States. It is also found in Ontario and Quebec in Canada. How bad can the damage get From here: If you can see damage from the beetle then Surveys have shown that the emerald ash borer damages and kills trees in stands within one to four years of ...


7

Firstly, you will probably want to cut the plant off at stump level again. I don't think burning stumps is very effective, or practical. I usually remove the crown, and kill the roots, but there are options. When I deal with this type of thing, I find that I get great results (but use a lot of energy) using a stump grinder and some full-strength glyphosate. ...


7

Instead of thinking of an either this or that choice let's open the problem up for other solutions. The problem is: roots have broken into our concrete cistern Tree roots will grow where there is water so it seems possible that your cistern was leaking and the tree took advantage. To repair or replace your cistern you will have to do some heavy ...


7

I checked out your other ID question - as a Eucalypt, you can either remove it completely, taking out the roots or killing them with brushwood killer (these develop a long tap root, and by now I'd expect that to be impossible to remove carefully enough to replant elsewhere, specially if its E. gunni), or you can wait till mid spring, then cut it down as low ...


7

You can reduce the height by up to half, but if you do, it will grow in an ugly shape afterwards. Holly tends to apical domination, meaning it gives a good approximation of a pyramidal shape if left to its own devices - reducing the height means you will get more than one branch regrowing from the cut areas, so the pyramidal shape will be lost. It's also a ...


5

Likely dead. The simplest verification is to peel a narrow strip of bark from the trunk (at a point about chest high, say). If you see NO GREEN = DEAD. If, on the other hand you see green, there is still life. If it should turn out that the tree is alive, the wound you've made will regrow. This regrowth will happen much faster by wrapping it right away ...


5

I don't think you can get a better opinion than an arborist on site. I will note that topping any tree is not a solution and should not be recommended at all. It creates the conditions for rot to start and weakly attached growth at the cut. Trees that fall have some things in common: at the edge of the forest or fully exposed thin layer of soil over ...


5

Remove it. If it is soft, you can do it by hand, otherwise use a stump grinder. Replace it with topsoil. The wood, if left in the soil, will rob it from nitrogen, and also sink in once decomposition takes place. I always try to be thorough, because if you don't, you will end up with sunken patches and possibly non uniform lawn coloring from different ...


5

Have you considered goats? (I have no idea if they'll munch on sea buckthorn, but it might be something to consider.) We're investigating grazing sheep on ~4 acres (~1.5 hectare) where wild blackberries are a problem and have been told that they will help keep it under control. If not goats, other livestock may work. (Pigs, from what I understand, may be ...


5

I can't see how there can be any options other than strong weedkillers or physical removal, and obviously blanket use of weedkillers is out of the question in this case. What we did in a similar situation in Texas with Ligustrum (brushy/woody invasive but no berries and no spines as such; known as 'privet' in the UK) is to cut it down to ground level, and ...


5

Need a close up of the leaves to be sure what it is - at the moment, I'm guessing possibly a Pittosporum, or maybe some kind of holly, but really need a better picture of the leaves. That said, however, I don't know who's responsible for the planting outside your office window, but you should speak to whoever it is and strongly suggest they remove the ...


5

Get some lopping shears. Open the window. From inside, lop off 2 or 3 of the lower, smaller branches, just enough to get a little more light in, and allow a few angles of view to the outside. Don't overdo this. Discard the branches inside (don't leave them laying outside on the ground). Wait a few weeks. Either stop now or go to (2).


4

HCl isn't very poisonous, it is corrosive, but not too poisonous. Glycophosphate, on the other hand is poisonous to plants, but I wouldn't apply to a watershed. I think for your situation covering with a tarp would be the best, especially if the area gets direct sun.


4

You could burn it out or use a pick axe to split the base or paint it with something like root stump killer (overhere i would suggest TBK stump killer in the UK) expensive stuff and must be used neat not dilute as the instructions say so(never works if you do!), one must damage the stump first and mash up the exposed bark on the outside to allow the ...


4

The easiest way to kill any tree is salt. Get a moderately sized bag of salt and place it over a cut tree trunk. But once you have killed this tree, please plant another tree elsewhere.


4

The chips can take years to fully decompose and this process will take the nitrogen in the surrounding substrate. The more nitrogen, the faster decomposition of the chips. My advice: Remove all the chips (if you like store it for later use as mulch). Cover the hole with a very similar substrate to which surrounds (this is to maintain the same water ...


4

If you can't dig it out, your best luck will be had using a pruning saw and taking it off at ground level. To keep it from coming back, drill small holes straight into the stems, going in at least an inch, but not going through the wood into soil. You can then use a 50% glyphosate mixture and fill the holes, being careful not to spill much on the surrounding ...


4

Without actually touching and crushing in my own hands, without being able to tests I would venture this is the result of tilling up blue clay. Do you have clay soils? Have you ever seen layers of this light bluish gray as you dug into the soil profile? It is close to the same porcelain clay that valuable porcelain figurines, dishes are made from. ...


4

It depends on the species. Some are fast growers, others are slow growers. My grandparents have planted black locusts (Robinia pseudoacacia) to border a small garden they had. The trees were growing fast and then parts of them were cut for firewood because of its high heat content. These trees have an invasive habit and they are kept from invading by ...


4

If you cut the tree down you don't need to remove the roots. They will die and decompose naturally in a few years. Assuming the roots under your house are in complete darkness, nothing will grow there even if you get a few suckers growing from the roots elsewhere in the yard. Removing a substantial amount of the roots on one side of the tree without felling ...


3

Hard to imagine an 8' fig tree having roots invasive enough to break into your cistern. Yes, you should move that tree, at 8' there is a very good chance at survival. Gotta see where it is that you and that tree are located. In the Northern hemisphere we are about ready to go into fall then winter. Dig a trench about 2' diameter, a foot deep around this ...


3

If it were me, I would remove the stumps as much as possible before replanting the bed. Arborvitae can sometimes re-sprout even after being cut back severely, and the wood, while soft, is fairly resistant to decay. This means you may be waiting quite a while for nature to take care of the problem for you, even if it doesn't manage to regrow its top.


3

Primarily a question of time. If you want to regrade the yard and have it stay put, you need to remove the whole stump & roots, since they will shrink as they rot and (gradually) leave a hole in the yard. If you don't mind refilling the hole as it develops, you don't need to bother with removing the stump. Being a low-effort, not too fussy gardener, I ...


3

In the end, here's what I did: I hacked it down to a stump again. I poisoned the cut stump with Triclopyr. That killed it stone dead, so I had a guy with a bobcat pull out the stump while he was doing other work on the front yard.


3

Contact your county's local agriculture extension that works with your land grant university. They won't have the financial interest of a tree service and so you can feel comfortable that their answer is honest.


3

Remove the large trunks, It should be safe for the holly tree. Just that it take one or two years to have a nice tree from other trunks (before that, the leaves and branches will be imbalanced in few directions.


3

I have two chippers (one petrol, one electrical both with max. diameter of 5 cm) but unfortunately both are too small for chipping larger branches not to mention trunks. This spring I've decided to remove about 50 apple trees and since I didn't want just to trow whole trees away I did this: removed limbs/branches and moved logs away cut larger branches ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible