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7

Some of the usual suspects are not mentioned in your plan including: landscape fabric between the gravel back fill behind the wall and the soil four inch drain pipe with sleeve at the inside base of the wall so when water cannot drain in the winter due to frozen ground it accumulates in drain pipe instead of pushing the wall a slight incline into the bank ...


6

Stone is available from building and construction stores, stone suppliers, direct from the quarry and, occasionally from construction sites when you have permission. Although most of the planet is made of stone there is only a small fraction that is useful as building material for steps and walls and patios. Stone that is all about the same thickness is the ...


5

A linear brick wall is strong in compression but resists lateral forces poorly. The serpentine wall attempts to overcome that with its curvature so that it provides as much strength as a linear two brick wall but uses far fewer bricks to build. However that strength comes at a cost in that the convex portions of the wall are strong, but the concave portions ...


5

This is a dry stone wall that has been built without mortar or a poured concrete foundation. The site has several challenges: the area above the wall slopes so any rain or runoff water will go down the slope into the wall there are trees adjacent to the wall whose roots will grow the stone is irregular the frost line in your area is around three to four ...


4

Honestly, due to the slope and the fact that building rock walls is a learned skill, I would recommend you hire someone to do it right. I have seen some amazing craftsmanship in a rock wall that was built just this past summer in the old school fashion of just fitting the rocks together so they stay put.


4

As an engineer who has designed numerous retaining walls it is obvious that non engineers are doing internet research and don't fully understand what they are looking at. The wall in questions can be properly designed in several way to use so called "mafia" blocks. The wall must resist the horizontal force from the soil and any live loads on top. The ...


3

I just need to add that any wall above 4' has to be engineered. Is there anyway that you could terrace this? Is there enough room to install 2, 4' walls or better yet, 3' walls? Perhaps the rules are different where you live but 8' walls will need extra attention to drainage, dead men and need to know what is happening above this wall? Is it getting ...


3

I'm not a mason, but my general inclination is that a single row of bricks without some reinforcement (rebar through brick at regular intervals) wouldn't be strong enough. I realize they are curved which does give the wall a certain type of structure (I forget what it's called), but I think there's also load issue (perhaps thinking of it as torque helps). ...


3

I agree with Roxy this would be the optimal way. However, I see several problems with that approach - 1) it's relatively difficult to build a decent wall without removing the fence boards. You just don't have a lot of space to work in. 2) I'd want to check with the neighbors as this will likely not only affect the plantings on their side, but also the way ...


3

I would cut off the bottom of the wood fence and build a masonry/stone/block retaining wall under it (just inside the plane of the fence). I would use whatever is the cheapest product that I could find. I would leave at least a one inch gap between the top of the wall and the fence and fill in the gap by screwing a ground-contact rated 2x6 to the bottom of ...


3

You'll need a minimum of 4" of crushed limestone; for a wall of that height I'd probably use 6" just to be safe. Most people like using washed limestone as a foundation as opposed to "base" since it has no "fines" and won't settle as much. Usually the limestone is put on top of a landscape fabric to prevent soil infiltration and settling. The foundation is ...


3

Yes, a Crinkle Crankle Serpentine wall that has no other job to do such as hold back soil and is only 15-18" high, has a decent foundation of compacted gravel and a foot deep concrete foundation and the units are mortared together will be able to support human weight...you won't need to double it at all unless you actually want people to be comfortable, have ...


2

You're smart to look for ways to improve the drainage here, since the number one cause of a failed retaining wall is poor drainage. In a perfect world, weep holes in a retaining wall should be vertical, about two inches/5 cm in height, spaced six inches/15 cm above ground level, and not less than 12 feet/3 m on center. I'd put at least three in each wall, ...


1

The bark appears to be Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) which you can verify when it flowers. It looks like a previous owner had your concern about the tree in this location and decided to try to cut it down. The result was that it produced multiple suckers from the base which the owner ignored. The roots are evidently finding new sources of ...


1

I don't know if it would support the weight of a number of people, or even one, (though I suspect not) but it's unlikely to be an issue, because anyone perching on it won't stay there long, it'd be far too uncomfortable. Most dual purpose low walls are built wide enough to take a 9 inch flat paving slab on top (though they can be wider than that), on top of ...


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