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6

First, bamboo are really difficult to ID. I don't think I could do it from what you have. It does, however look like true bamboo, a grass that is 'woody' and does not die back to the ground. Lots of other plants are called bamboo and are not a grass at all, though I don't really argue with common names. Ebay is notorious for having listings that are ...


6

I'm sorry to say that its likely most of those methods will work - chopping it all down and covering with black plastic will probably mean you'll have bamboo shoots growing up through the plastic, it'll come through that in no time. Digging it out with machinery might work, if you do it all at once and make sure to get out all roots, no matter how deep they ...


6

Wow, a runaway bamboo forest, must be nice! No soil can be ruined except by being covered with asphalt or concrete or 'landscape fabric' and dumping biocides on it...nutrients or rather chemicals for photosynthesis are rarely found in soil. They are in the bio mass. That is why we humans need to learn how to judiciously add those critical chemicals to the ...


5

Ain't no such animal. Well, Plant. I've looked... Clumping bamboos (cold-climate tolerant) do not grow particularly "large and structural". For that matter, in zone 5, about the best you can hope for IME is "garden stake size" and that's with a running bamboo (Phyllostachys). The big stuff won't survive the winter, and the stuff that will survive the ...


5

Phyllostachys edulis, common name Moso bamboo, is the variety used to make various fabrics. Unfortunately, its only hardy down to Zone 6, grows best in zone 7-9, needing a temperature above 5 °F as a minimum, so you can't grow it where you are. Turning bamboo into fabric likely isn't something you could do yourself anyway, but there's more information ...


5

It does appear to be one of the bamboos, not sure which- its looking a bit tatty so hard to say which one it might be. The stems on it just look straw coloured at the moment, but if it is a bamboo, those stems should be pretty rigid and hard to break, even if they're dead. As it grows, it might be possible to decide what it is, whether that's a true grass ...


5

Timing is, IME, important. I got 3 bamboo (A Phyllostachys that I vary between thinking is one of 3 or 4 specific cultivars) that were rudely chopped off and dug up in the middle of the summer (the house it came from was being sold...) One survived, barely, and has since gone on to be a moderately decent stand given that it's not fully hardy here and all top ...


4

Based primarily on cold-hardyness and "looks like bamboo to me" (I find the low-growing types unsatisfying.) Phyllostachys nuda Phyllostachys bissetii Phyllostachys aureosulcata You should have it easier than I do - I have one of those three (best I can ID - not as unambiguous as you might hope) which came here from CT, where it was managing 35 feet - ...


4

The rhizomes and plants above the ground all support one another. If you can dig out a section of 5-10 rhizomes as a clump, they'll have a better chance of surviving. If you are very careful, you can also dog away the dirt around the leading edge of the bamboo. Leading edge means where the new growth is moving to. You can carefully remove the youngest ...


4

Fargesia Robusta, one of the greatest bushing bamboo. This bamboo is able to withstand harsh weather. It will be safe between temperatures of 0 Degrees Fahrenheit - (17 degrees Celsius) and 90 degrees Fahrenheit - (32 degrees Celsius) It can be used to create beautiful wall hedging around any area and it will stay quite green. Bamboo usually is quite ...


3

Beautiful planter. Hope you leave it finished just as it is now. A few points, one would be to completely remove the bottom panel. Even bamboo will suffocate immersed in water and mud. IS that a live oak? Love the fence built around the branch. You could punch holes in the bottom of this planter but you would have to lift the bottom so there was a layer ...


3

As mentioned in the comments, that's a Dracaena. Notice how the leaf scars are far closer spaced on the wide area. this is explained by a change in the growing environment during that time (likely increased light), causing closer leaf spacing and a more robust stem. Not caused by the stem widening after hardening. To see more of this effect, try to move it ...


3

There's no substitute for experience, but in addition to the answers you got, it's worth taking a look at The Bamboo Garden. They provide a wealth of information about bamboos in general, as well as specific choices for your application. The two main types of bamboo are Clumping and Running. (There are a few ground cover types, but they're less common.) ...


3

Don't know - I have a runner (Phyllostachys - possibly aureosulcata "spectabilis" but ID is dubious) that's been in a 16 gallon pot (indoors) for several years. Given the climate here, it has grown taller than the parts that are still outdoors, since the top growth gets killed every winter and those plants have increased slowly as a result. On the other hand ...


3

I also have a bamboo plant which looks the same. I got it from a local nursery. I cannot tell you the name, however, I can tell you that when the new shoots comes out from the base of the plant, they may have a tendency to bend. You may tie jute ropes around the plant along the length of the plant to keep them straight. For nutrients, I think you are doing ...


2

Based on the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map you are very close to the critical temperature for Black Bamboo. It suggests an average annual low of 0 to -5. The resources I can find say it can't handle much below 5 degrees. Above 5 it's fine, below -5 it's probably dead. In between you get varying degrees of cold stress that won't quite kill it, but will likely ...


2

The problem is its in a pot, which makes it much more vulnerable to cold in the winter. If you insulate the pot well, you might get it to survive, but if it gets cold enough for the whole pot to freeze solid, then it'll die, and in your Zone, it just might get cold enough. Stacking bales of hay round a pot won't be an attractive sight all winter, but it ...


2

They'll bust through. You need to dig out rhizomes to manage a bamboo border.


2

Without a close-up photo my guess is Thrips. Easy to manage, sucking insects. Here is a good article on control. Get a hand lens to make absolutely sure this is your target insect before applying any pesticide. I'd thin out some of the foliage before treating. Thrip control


2

You've said you're in the north of the UK, which leaves an obvious candidate because its fully hardy - Fargesia nitida, or Chinese Fountain bamboo. It gets 2.5 to 4 metres tall, and the upper parts of the plant will droop over or cascade once it gets tall enough, which is why its got the common name of Chinese Fountain. Spread is 1 to 1.5 metres, so you can ...


2

Bamboo GardensThis article might alleviate much stress and anxiety. I guess the 'invasive' nature of plants is based upon seed dispersal, not roots. What the previous owners should have done was to create a barrier at least 1 foot deep around the roots of the bamboo to sequester the roots and stop the encroachment. 1.5 feet barrier such as galvanized metal ...


2

First recommendation is to draw a plan of the area with broad measurements marked, compass points, building locations and so on. You may already have a base plan as a result of the real estate transaction. Make sure survey markers are highly visible and respected. Then invite the local utility people in to mark where their sewer, water, electricity and gas ...


2

First, let me just say that the bleach treatment will do nothing much in regard to the roots of the bamboo - the majority of the root system is widespread under the hard landscaping, and is inaccessible. Translocation of the bleach throughout the root system is not going to happen. Second, the reason given in another answer (now apparently removed) as to ...


1

I can appreciate your situation. While I do not have bamboo, I do have milkweed, mares tail and various thistles to contend with in an open garden which to some extent present a similar problem. They are extremely persistent; they set up deep underground networks and seem to communicate with each other, sharing ideas and nutrients in their duty to expand and ...


1

Despite the label on the plant saying in large letters 'bamboo', it is not a bamboo at all, but an orchid named Dendrobium nobile. You probably haven't done anything wrong to cause the flowers to disappear - flowers are temporary and inevitably fade away, although this particular plant is quite fussy about temperature when it's actually flowering. Its ...


1

Yes, you can cut it off - take it out as close to the base, or any new growth, as possible. A few canes regularly die back and new ones grow all the time on mature bamboo anyway - that's how we get bamboo canes to use as supports for other plants!


1

You cannot kill bamboo roots. Take it from me. My house was surrounded with 7 different types of bamboo on a very small lot (thanks to ex husband). I have literally had to rent an excavator 3 times to get the entire root system out. Sometimes the holes it left were 6 feet deep. Finally, I thought that I was through with it, since we treated all the ...


1

I would suggest this is a Gracilis bamboo.


1

This looks to me like some overgrown crab grass I have seen in Florida. As a side note bamboo is technically a kind of grass.


1

Don't worry! Your bamboo is growing in right way. I suggest that you shift it on ground. Upto one year it will grow like a grass. And then it starts growing some thicker as pencils and grow up to three to four feet straight and then start shooting and loss its straightness. Gradually again start growing some more thicker as thick as thumb and raise upto ...


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