Hot answers tagged

9

No, don't cut this one back,it'll ruin its structure, and anyway, they bleed like crazy if you cut them. The thing to remember about any Ficus is they're fussy - they absolutely hate a change in conditions, and in particular, a draught. Indoors, most will drop leaves when the seasons change, so in spring and again in autumn, and mostly because the heating ...


7

It's a Fiddle-leaf Fig (Ficus lyrata). Here are some conditions to provide: Pot/mix: These have large, invasive root systems and need large pots. They like a well drained, peaty mix with some mineral content (like grit). To keep them from growing too big (6' isn't uncommon), yearly root pruning and repotting can be necessary. Simply lift the plant from the ...


6

My first piece of advice is that you should get used to the idea that some branches sole purpose is to hold foliage that make the trunk thicker or just help the tree from getting bigger. Once that purpose has been accomplished you should simply discard it - it is of no use any longer. There are, however, many circumstances in which the plant will not ...


6

I suspect its been going short of water - you've not said what size pot its in, and a photograph would have been extremely useful, but 2 cups (unless each cup is a litre or so) every fortnight doesn't sound like anywhere near enough water for a plant that's three feet tall. The trouble with potting soil is, if it dries out, its quite difficult to get it nice ...


5

It's hard to be certain from the photograph,but it would appear that the pot your Ficus is in is way too small for it. The plant needs to develop a larger root system in order to support healthy and abundant topgrowth, and it's not able to do that currently. You can check by turning the plant out of its pot - if the root ball is solid with roots wrapping ...


5

This plant is Ficus elastica which can grow 30 meters tall. When you see it growing outdoors you realize that this plant can be as wide as it is tall due to the numerous trunks. A healthy specimen when grown indoors will have multiple trunks but will tend to have less leaves on the bottom. Older leaves will yellow and drop from the bottom up in response ...


4

I do not recommend solid fertilizer sticks for small plants. When the sticks get wet they release enough fertilizer to burn the delicate hair roots that absorb fertilizer. As the soil dries out the roots grow towards the fertilizer and get burned again when the soil is watered again. This guide recommends putting spikes at the perimeter of the pot for ...


4

You've not said which variety of Ficus you're trying to root in water - I know it works with Ficus benjamina and its cultivars, but not sure it does with all varieties. I wouldn't add anything to the water, especially not fertilizer of any sort - for one thing, the cutting cannot use any fertilizer until its got roots anyway, so it won't help. The cuttings ...


3

I would remove all dead, diseased and damage material from this plant first before even thinking of doing any remedial shaping or pruning. When other trees where I live begin to loose their canopies like this its usually a sign of poor aeration around the roots due to high traffic and compaction of the soil around the base, however the method of improving ...


3

Dan, you already have some good suggestions in the comments but here goes anyway. Sudden leaf collapse can be caused by a violent change in environment such as an overnight outside in frosty weather, or more likely as @Giacomo says, a root issue. It's highly likely that some chemical has been added to the root ball, a salt of some kind that has nuked the ...


3

I’m no ficus expert, though my green thumb is something I’m proud of. As for not rooting in water...I guess it very well depends on the specific type of ficus you are talking about. I have 5 benjamina ficus cuttings that were given to me, all about a foot tall. I didn’t trim them down, didn’t do anything except put them in a water mixture. I kept them in a ...


3

To me, it sounds like a better place to grow a vine than either bamboo (which I personally find to be very messy) or a tree. As @bamboo has pointed out, assuming you really do mean mm and not cm that's a pretty small pot for a tree 3m tall. At the very least you'd have to anchor the tree to some sort of support, as a post attached to the end of the deck. ...


3

My answer to this is classic potted Bamboo. Its the perfect screen, grows tall with a cool contemporary, beautiful aesthetic. I am a native New Zealander born and bred with no Asian bias to bamboo. If you could plant the bamboo in the earth I would recommend the bamboo species with the root system that clumps together and does not spread.


3

Yes, they are seed pods. As Ficus benjamina is a member of the Fig family they are figs and are edible when ripe. (Notice: I did not say tasty and I would not eat them) The ficus family is pollinated by species specific tiny wasps which are unlikely to have access to the figs. So you will not get viable seed from the figs. They are likely to increase in ...


3

This plant is a member of the Ficus family. This plant is severely pot bound as it wants to grow into a 60 M tree. To repot I suggest you first consider where you are going to put it. If it is to be placed inside where your ceiling might be 2 - 3 M tall (~8') then this plant is probably too big already. These plants are rugged and can be cut back hard ...


3

Why are you rooting your ficus in water? The roots that are formed are water roots not soil roots. I would forgo any fertilizer, purchase great starting soil, provide a cover or dome for moisture and stability in warmth/humidity and plant right in the soil. Do not add fertilizer until the third set of leaves. Once plants have emerged from the soil you ...


3

I've taken a couple of Bonsai classes from Professionals and they've recommended you either use a bonsai fertilizer or if you use a regular fertilizer, then only use half or a quarter of the strength. They recommend fertilizing more frequently at a weaker concentration as opposed to full strength once or twice a year.


3

As the new leaves go through their embryo and very early development they are very soft and fragile, and are frequently folded up along the main rib so that what ends up far apart actually started out close together. In the Ficus family the very young leaves are protected by a sheath; this can be a good and bad thing, since on the one hand it protects, but ...


3

Fixus elastica is native to humid climate, therefore it makes good friends with moss. As for the moss, it depends on the indoor humidity a lot. If you have powerful heating, which dries the air, the moss won’t grow well. So if your towels easily get completely dry indoors, it’s probably not the best for mosses. Anyway, it’s a good idea to make an ...


2

Not really, the little balls are unfertilized fruit. From here: The fig fruit is an enclosed inflorescence, sometimes referred to as a syconium, an urn-like structure lined on the inside with the fig's tiny flowers. The unique fig pollination system, involving tiny, highly specific wasps, known as fig wasps that enter via ostiole these sub-closed ...


2

Measure moisture depth by getting a metal or wooden rod about 1/4 inches in diameter and pushing it gently into the moist soil. When you feel the resistance change or stop, try a few more times in a few other places to make sure it wasn't just a rock. Measure the distance you were able to push the rod before the resistance changed. That is your watering ...


2

Take my advice here with a grain of salt; while I have some knowledge, it's been a while since I've actually maintained a bonsai, and I live in a better climate for them. I haven't tried growing one in damp shade, and my below information is the result of a bit of reasearch/memory combined. I'm happy to expand on some points if you find that necessary. ...


2

Photos would be very useful, but in the meantime, find a position for it and leave it there - don't expose to sunlight, they don't like it. They like bright light, but not direct sun, nor do they like draughts.


2

Peperomia pictures Good job guys, absolutely Peperomia!


2

On the assumption your measurements are in mm, not cm (300 cm is 3 metres and no container would be that wide), that would make your pot (in feet and inches) about two and a half feet deep by roughly a foot across, or 80 cm deep by 30 cm wide. The tree you've mentioned will grow in it for a while, but inevitably, over time, its growth will be very much ...


2

This is not a cigarette burn. This is a fungus/virus/bacterial infection brought on by overwatering and not enough light. See the poorly annotated picture below that shows the typical initial infection followed by a growth ring as the problem grows. This plant is variegated with the white and green leaf colour. It does not photosynthesize as efficiently ...


2

Main reasons for re-potting are that the soil is depleted of nutrients or the plant has out grown the size of the pot. Check the underside of the pot for roots coming through. This indicates the plant has reached the limit of the pot size. If there are none, inspect the quality of the soil to see if it perhaps need a feed or if all the smaller, finer grains ...


2

I would suggest the plant is suffering from low, insufficient light conditions. For some reason, people like to place plants where they cannot truly grow or thrive. The plant seems reasonably healthy. The soil is probably adequate. The plant seems neither overwatered or dehydrated. Low light often affects the strength and formation of new growth. The leaves ...


2

Water it, more light and cut it back to within a few inches of the soul. Patience will reward you with new sprouts as these plants bud readily from old wood


2

Fig trees of all kinds except the really tall ones prefer bright but indirect light. Since your Starlight is variegated it will grow better in really good light since it shows less green to the light than other fully green types. Put it out on the deck in a protected spot on bright, warm cloudy days but hide it from direct sun. For soil you want something ...


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