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13

You've got a bad infestation of fig wax scale. The ants are there for the honeydew, and are ant-farming. You want to get rid of the scale, they're basically living off of your plant, using up resources. If it's a small plant, you can use a pen or other pointy thing and pop as many off as you can, onto a small drop-cloth, to be destroyed. The rest can be ...


9

If you prune before end of summer, you're pruning off fruit that could develop in the fall. I've never heard of pruning in summer so a tree could recover before winter. Pruning should done in the dormant season, as figs bleed a latex sap if pruned during the growing season. Link Pruning of fig trees should be done during cold weather if possible. ...


9

Those white dots are spider mites. There are a lot of them so you will need to apply at least three treatments of soap and water at a rate of 5 ml /liter at five to seven day intervals. This will catch the next generation when they hatch. Don't put too much soap in the mix or you will burn the leaves with the fatty acid content of the soap. If you have ...


7

I think you need to do a few things. First, put the cut end into a watered 'airy' medium like vermiculite or pearlite or even sphagnum (orchid moss) -many other things meet the need but aren't so commonly available. It will also help to dip the cut end into rooting hormone. I know the big box stores carry RooTone powder that will do what you need. It is ...


7

The brown dots are an advanced infestation of scale. This is not the fig scale which looks pinkish and has an unusual shape but a more common variety. This is a common pest and regardless of the species control is the same. The white dots could be young scale or whitefly attracted by the sticky sap the scale excretes. You can learn more from this link: ...


7

Instead of thinking of an either this or that choice let's open the problem up for other solutions. The problem is: roots have broken into our concrete cistern Tree roots will grow where there is water so it seems possible that your cistern was leaking and the tree took advantage. To repair or replace your cistern you will have to do some heavy ...


6

Figs are pollinated by species specific wasps. Figs have an inconspicuous flower and if the wasps are not present you will not get fruit set. are there other figs in the neighbourhood that are flowering? figs require a spell of cool weather when their soil is kept drier. Does this happen where you live? also see this excellent answer on pruning


5

It's neither good nor bad - how effective azomite will be is simply down to the level of trace elements already in your soil. If none is lacking, then its a waste of time and money adding it. It contains no nitrogen or phosphorus, but does contain some potassium - these three are known as NPK and are key ingredients in ordinary fertilizers. The manufacturers ...


5

Seeing as you don't know the exact fig tree variety you have, just it's hardy in USDA Hardiness zones 7 to 11 and you're in zone 6, I would be inclined to grow it in a large pot/container. Why? Fig tress aren't particular cold hardy (though some varieties are more hardy than others). Growing it in a large pot/container will enable you to move it to a ...


5

This looks to me as a sunburnt. In the store, the plant was sheltered from direct sun. Then you put it outside, and that's too much sun for the leaves it had grown in the shades back there. Its not too bad for it I think, and new leaves won't develop such weakness since they will grow in the sun. Maybe just remove it from full-day sunlight and leave it a ...


5

I'm wondering where you got this fig plant from - the interior looks very like what's called a caprifig, which only produces inedible fruit. Its female flowers are host to a wasp which is the pollinator for other, edible figs. The male wasp never leaves the caprifig fruit, but the female, having laid her eggs, does leave, and in so doing, carries pollen with ...


4

The two types of pruning cuts you can make are thinning and heading. Thinning is removing an entire shoot, branch, or limb, back to the point where it originated. Thinning cuts are the ones you should use most of the time, because they tend to open up light channels throughout the tree. Often just thinning out the limbs that are crowding or crossing over ...


4

That appears to be bacterial leaf spot. There is no cure, but you can help prevent it for the next season with some simple cultural steps, like cleaning up fallen leaves, minimizing stress, and building your plant's health through the soil. I have more information on that, in my answer here. As for toxicity to humans, this disease does not affect humans ...


4

Your bonsai is suited to be outside, but where it sits in your yard / balcony depends on your climate. If you've had it inside next to a window etc. you will just as likely kill it by sticking it outside in full sun. As your bonsai is a tree it prefers sunlight, water and fresh air. If you've ever visited a place with plenty of bonsai you will notice they ...


4

By the way, not all figs require wasps for pollination. In fact, most grown here in the US do not. Some varieties commonly grown without pollination include LSU Gold, Hollier, Sal's, Excell, Negronne, Brown Turkeys, Deanna, Hardy Chicago, Atreano, Paradiso, Black Spanish, Verte, Osborne Prolific, Conadria, and Lattarula. If yours is one of these, or ...


4

Ficus lyrata is native to West Africa and widely grown as a house plant. They are great indoor plants as they are long lived, tolerant of a wide range of conditions and not subject to too many pests due to the hard waxy leaves. This plant has no problems dealing with hard pruning cuts as you can see on the old growth on the central stem. From the picture ...


4

We tried rooting a rubber plant, which is technically a fig, in water once. It didn't work (the cutting was in the water, and alive, for a super long time, too, but it never got any roots). So, if you're left between those two choices, I would go with the soil. Soil generally works better and faster for rooting cuttings anyway, though (as long as it's a new, ...


4

No, you should not. Without at least one leaf, your cutting is unlikely to grow any roots. Photosynthesis is necessary to grow roots. The leaves must take in carbon dioxide and as a consequence will lose water to the air if the relative humidity is less than 100%. Hence, you need to make a humidity tent or terrarium around the plant so that the air inside ...


4

The likeliest explanation for loss of fruit in this way is actually insufficient water - any fruiting plant, once the fruit is forming, needs extra supplies of water to complete the process, particularly during their first five years. If the water supply is insufficient, the plant will sacrifice its fruit to save itself. Given your Celeste has only been in ...


4

Figs are very susceptible to fungal disease while rooting, so managing moisture well is important, and using a rooting hormone w a fungicide is a good.option. I typically cut the leaves to reduce moisture loss, but would prob not do that since you took them a while ago. I greatly prefer taking winter hardwood cuttings of figs, as there is virtually no work ...


4

I know Toronto winters they are unpredictable at best. There are often snow storms and temperatures worthy of zone 5 but not for long. You did follow recommended procedure by putting it in a cool place but as they say in real estate: "Location is everything". Specifically, do you know what temperature ranges you find in your garage? I tried my garage in ...


4

It depends. Pruning now would reduce the sensibly the strength of the plant, so it the plant is already weak don't prune it. On the other hand, if the plant is strong, you can do some pruning, but I would not do it as hard as I would do it in winter.


4

That is fungus growing on your coffee grounds, your cat seems to like it. I am not sure if it is wise to put coffee grounds in your (indoor) plant pots. I have read that it is okay for outdoors garden soils, but I would compost it first in a compost heap or container. You probably don't want to have fungus growing in your living room, see other post and ...


4

It'll be an insect, or the larvae of an insect, that has caused this skeletonizing on the leaves. If you haven't spotted any caterpillars or other creatures feeding during the day, then take a torch out at night and inspect what's going on after dark. It may be too late to see the cause - if you had a few larvae, they may by now have pupated or even hatched ...


3

When you take stem cuttings you want to denude most of the cutting of leaves because those leaves draw water from the cutting which in unable to to provide it yet, however you will want to leave a leaf at the tip of each cutting so it can get what it needs from the sun and so you don't inadvertently damage the tip bud, which is where the tree will want to ...


3

I've never tried such with bonsai, but I found this article (with images) on how to root a ficus cutting. It describes trimming the cutting to the desired form first, then planting it in a highly aerated medium so the cutting is above the water. Then place this in a highly humid environment and lots good indirect sunlight.


3

The reason your "dwarf fig" is not so dwarfed anymore is because it was reproduced via cutting. The root stock that would have the cutting grafted to it is what determines the size of the mature shrub. To answer your question though, I think it is probably still recovering from the stress of having to completely regrow.


3

Fruit drop in figs can be caused by nematodes but there are other causes. From this document causes include: cool weather insufficient irrigation weak trees and nematodes. Figs that develop on the ends of branches often dry out or drop because there has not been enough heat for them to mature. Smyrna-type figs will drop when they are partly grown if they ...


3

The times when tree roots damage poured concrete foundations are few and far between. However tree roots will grow in search of water and grow into water pipes. If your foundation does not have any cracks,water from gutters and eaves drains at least six feet (2 M) from the foundation and there are no water pipes near the planting area you should not have ...


3

According to the information I have, fig trees do not need to be pruned except in order to be turned into the desired shape when young. If you don't particularly have a desired shape, then you wouldn't need to prune it - which would solve that part of the problem. If the tree is not dormant, don't put it outside in the cold weather - without experiencing ...


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