16

Rollover is, indeed, the major concern. And it's one that kills a number of people each year, all of whom were probably just as sure as you are that it wouldn't happen to them... Don't be a statistic. If the maker of your mower recommends mowing up and down the slope, it's for a reason.


15

Pumpkins are easy to compost. If they were used for crafts/decoration, it's possible that they contain inorganic matter such as paint, ribbon, candle wax, plastic twine, foil, etc. Make sure all such material (if any) is removed. The seeds will survive all but the hottest compost heaps, and can be a nuisance later. I don't usually worry about it, and pull ...


12

Time of year: Any time of year works, as long as the ground is not frozen, or the air very hot and dry. Obviously frozen ground will be 'hard to work with', and you will not be able to plant the tree properly. If the air is hot and dry, then sometimes even when the soil has sufficient moisture, the tree with it's compromised root system could dry out and ...


10

Sure! You can reseed that. Wait till the ground is going to stay drained.Grass will germinate and grow fast in wet conditions, but then if you walk through, or mow, it will lie down and rot. Because there is loose soil there already, when you're ready to reseed you could simply Rake over the area briskly to looses the top layer of soil, even it out, and ...


9

You can try rooting it if you want by snipping the stem just below a bud at the base, stripping off the thorns and leaves, leaving one leaf at the top if you like, but you can take them all off, and inserting it into a sharp sand or sand/compost mix in a deep pot. The stem should be around 9 inches long, and you need to bury it so that only a quarter of the ...


8

ViSu, You reminded me of the same experience I and my friends had before. In our college days, we planted a number of saplings on a barren land\hill slope. As you are going to plant in a hilly area (which could be really hot these days), you need to take care of few things: Ensure your saplings are not very small. (Small plants can be eaten by local ...


8

Grafting is an old technique where two plants are joined. The idea is to take two varieties with different properties (think: strength) and combine them. For fruit trees, that would be: a "rootstock" (aka rootsystem, sometimes stem) that ensures stability, good nutrition and determines the final size of the tree (think dwarf, for example) and a "scion" (...


7

For ornamental use In my area, the most common mulch for landscaped ornamental beds is premium shredded bark mulch (my source) It's very nice to work with, is partially decomposed (usually very hot when I get it), decomposes in about a year (when I reapply), and adds to the organic matter content of the soil. The earthworms appear to love it, and will go ...


7

I take a bit of a different approach than J. Musser does (and here I am making an assumption based on the answer), but I agree with that approach when adding commercial fertilizer. Bagged fertilizer (e.g., 10-10-10) can be quite hard on young seedlings. J. Musser didn't specifically state the use of commercial fertilizer in that answer, but I believe that ...


7

It's dangerous to use a set amount of water per day, when watering potted plants. This is because they may use different quantities as they get older, and also because it is very easy to overwater, which could be fatal. It's better to water until the mix is wet, and then leave it until the top ½" of soil becomes dry. Use your finger to test this. You ...


7

That is called pollarding. It is a pruning system that promotes uniform yearly growth, in dense heads over the tree. You basically cut the branch ends at a certain diameter, and remove all smaller growth. Then on a yearly to almost a 20 year basis, remove the shoots that form, at the base. the result is the formation of these clublike heads, which grow in ...


7

Growing lilacs from seeds isn’t easy, but it can be done. It can take up to three or four years for a seed-propagated lilac to bloom, though, so you’ll have to be patient and just enjoy watching the bush grow! From Garden Guides: When growing seeds from a lilac, two things are of utmost importance. First, make sure you’re not harvesting seeds from a ...


7

Plant them as is, do not try to mend the bulbs. At best the bulb just needs some moisture from the surrounding soil. At worst, the bulb simply won't grow. If you are concerned about disease, you can throw the sad looking ones out, but don't bother trying to mend them, you'll do more harm than good.


7

The outer layers are thick, dry and dark brown. Should I peel them away, or is there reason to believe they may be protecting the healthy part of the bulb? Only remove them if they are hanging loose from the bulbs. The ones wrapped around the bulbs are protective and should not be removed. The tops are shriveled, but I can see some green down ...


6

It depends when you want them. They should last until winter in the ground without bolting. Carrots are normally biennial, and will bolt during season 2. You can harvest them at any time while growing, and can leave them until a hard freeze. They take frost, but not a hard freeze. There is another thing you can try: Put haybales end to end down both sides of ...


6

The little starts you buy at the grocery store have recently undergone a huge amount of stress, and wilting after being brought home is relatively common. They are usually grown fast in a greenhouse, sometimes with supplementary CO2 to promote fast growth. They are then packed and shipped (ground or air and ground) for hours, sometimes over a day. This ...


6

Grafting compatibility depends on genetic similarity. Because of this, the most successful grafts are between species, within the genera. Inter-generic grafts are usually not successful, but in some cases where the genera are genetically similar, grafting is rather reliable (like the practice of grafting pear cultivars onto the hardier and more resilient ...


6

The reason is potential for roll-over like Fiasco and Ecnerwal say. Perhaps you should invest in a used smaller hydraulic walk-behind mower. That is what professionals do. Match the mower to the job. You can find them almost free. Slopes are tricky to mow properly, have you considered making the sloped area into a planting bed? Lawns should be mowed ...


6

I have never heard of anyone recommending a layer of plastic with something over the top, gravel or anything else. Plastic will stop water permeating the ground, and any gravel on the top would be floating! A layer of permeable membrane (geotextile fabric) with an ornamental mulch (pebbles, gravel, limestone chippings, slate, pea shingle) keeps weeds down, ...


6

If the leaves/cotyledons are lying on the soil I would attempt to do something about this, so they would not rot. If it is only a part of the stem – don't bother. The seedling will continue growing up. When transplanting just plant it deeper, to put the bending point underground. It will become a part of the root system – not even hurting the appearance of ...


6

Bamboo's answer is good. I agree with everything stated there, just wanted to add the method I used when I did this years ago. I recut the cut ends (flat, and clean), but then topped the stems off (they were really long, so removed about half), leaving them at 9-10 inches. I cut about 1/4" above a large healthy leaf. Then I removed the leaves halfway up the ...


6

I bought this rose at rite aid on clearance two years ago. We put it in water, and the stem never turned brown. After about 9 months in a glass of water, I put it in soil. It grew a bunch of new branches, and about two weeks ago I saw a bud. I took this photo this morning. So, for people who say it can't re-root or grow new flowers, they are wrong! This is ...


6

Short answer, no, because that looks like a typical neglected UK garden to me, seen plenty like this in my time ... though I could be wrong! Assuming it is a UK garden, the procedures required are somewhat different from that already recommended in another answer. If your 'lawn' has had no attention for over a year, including not being cut, that's why it ...


6

This is another one that I've done. For reference I'm in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USDA zone 6b, last frost in April, First frost in September. We get 40-60" of precipitation per year, and the soil is mostly decent clay based soil, sometimes rocky. There were 3 of the trees and they were at about 12', so yours might be bigger. Because they dry and burn easily ...


6

There is direct contact between the two cambium layers - the removed bud has cambium (meristematic tissue) exposed on the cut side, and the T cut made in the stem it's to be grafted to has the bark or exterior tissue peeled back to reveal the cambium prior to insertion of the bud, as clearly demonstrated in the video you linked with. Whether the T cut in the ...


5

Chill conditioning or chill requirement. Certain plants need certain hours of chill time to increase production. For those plants you need to get the right amount to strike a good balance between vegetative growth and fruit production. Good info on chill conditioning strawberries here.


5

My list is based growing in the ground (not raised beds -- this is my experience). If you're growing in raised beds, you may be able to start a week earlier (they will warm up faster). If you need to build beds, you'll need to have those ready before you can start anything. I can't give exact dates, because individual locations vary widely in what can be ...


5

Solarization: It is a practice that can kill most soil organisms, included the good ones. Solarization basically consists in the following: Release the soil. Remove big weeds and big rocks. Irrigate. Seal the soil with tarps. Wait a little bit (four to twelve weeks). Remove the tarp. Add compost to the solarizated soil in order to restore beneficial ...


5

Plant your rosemary outside. It does horribly inside. There should be enough time for it to acclimate and put down some roots before it freezes. Don't fertilize it with a product high in nitrogen! Make sure the first number is lower than the last two. NPK, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium; you'll see 3 numbers on the package. The first number should ...


5

On most crop plants, I give them the first fertilizing at the three-leaf stage. This is when the first three leaves (not counting the cotyledons) reach full size. By this time, the root system has matured enough to handle the fertilizer, and the plant has also used up the reserves from the seed. I generally use a lighter feeding at first maybe a 2/3's ...


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