17

Strictly speaking something like a sour orange is possible. A lot of things are possible really. Citrus hybridization can get very complicated. There are four 'parent species' of citrus (Citron, Pomelo, Papeda and Mandarin). A lemon is a cross between a Citron and a Sour Orange (which is itself a cross of a Mandarin and a Pomelo). So that's 3 parent species ...


9

Yes and yes. It sounds like you have a sour orange which is typically used as root stock for full sized citrus trees. You can graft grapefruit, orange, lemons and limes to this stock. Oranges and grapefruit will do the best. If you put Mexican lime on one side and grapefruit on the other the lime side will grow slower and the grapefruit side faster and so ...


9

John McPhee wrote a very witty book on oranges, entitled, not surprisingly, 'Oranges'. One chapter recounts an effort to grow limes from seed, due to the pervasive presence of a virus in existing trees. Essentially, they grew hundreds of seedlings from limes, and got a tiny number of plants that grew limes. All the others produced some other citrus fruit. So,...


8

Grafting is an old technique where two plants are joined. The idea is to take two varieties with different properties (think: strength) and combine them. For fruit trees, that would be: a "rootstock" (aka rootsystem, sometimes stem) that ensures stability, good nutrition and determines the final size of the tree (think dwarf, for example) and a "scion" (...


8

Because of the large pith cavity in elderberry stems, grafting is tricky and good grafts are rare. It's better to grow them from cuttings. Spliced side grafting onto one-year-old seedlings may be successful. semi-ripe or softwood cuttings (best done when new shoots are not yet ripened) should have the stems plugged at the end (I use rose thorns) to help ...


8

Two words: Luther Burbank. He's your new hero. One of his early exploits was producing a crop of sapling plums IIRC faster than anyone else could. He did this by grafting seedling plums onto sapling apricots, which mature faster. Later experiments involved cross-breeding near-species which apparently produced offspring that represented a spectrum of the ...


8

The short answer is that they must be of the same species. There are lots of practical problems making successful grafts, but putting these aside (i.e., assuming grafts are done by masters of the trade), the chances of success decline, the less closely related the plants to be grafted are. Essentially, there are no problems within a species, such as ...


8

You may be right - the grafted part died back, the rootstock took over, and the only part that's left of the original grafted lemon is at the bottom. It shouldn't be thorny - the thorny parts will be off the rootstock, which might be sour lemon or some other citrus rootstock, hard to say, but growth off the stock might very well be thorny. If the leaves on ...


7

Your seedling will eventually get lemons if the conditions are right. It could take 5-10 years. Since you are growing from seed, it is impossible to know whether the lemons you get from your tree will be anything like the lemon from which you got the seed.


7

The term you need is actually 'vegetatively propagated' rather than 'cloned'. The answer is, essentially, yes, by and large, almost all plants can be vegetatively propagated, though different parts of the plant may be used and the methods used will vary, along with the level of difficulty. Parts which can be used include leaves, stems, shoots, bulbs, ...


6

Grafting compatibility depends on genetic similarity. Because of this, the most successful grafts are between species, within the genera. Inter-generic grafts are usually not successful, but in some cases where the genera are genetically similar, grafting is rather reliable (like the practice of grafting pear cultivars onto the hardier and more resilient ...


6

1) Apple onto apple usually works, not always. Bear in mind that grafts are weak spots and a grafted branch would have to be supported for years. A apple tree with two varieties grafted is often marketed as a "family tree". Grafting should really be onto the rootstock if you can. 2) I don't think so. Quince is used to provide roots to Pear trees to keep ...


6

You will be able to graft any peach, nectarine, or almond to that tree. It's also possible that a graft from another Prunus species would take. The first choice would be above, but you could also try plums or cherries or apricots. I have seen plum/peach combos sold commercially as fruit cocktail trees, so it must be possible.


6

I would approach this in a gradual fashion. The requested picture would help, but as a general idea, cut back perhaps 1/3 of the less desired part one year, and repeat. From a growth point of view, lopping it more from the top would be good, rather than just whacking off the lower limbs and encouraging it to grow taller. I should be clear that I don't mean ...


6

You can graft it back. If the wound has already dried, use a very sharp knife, as in a proper sharpened and honed chef's knife, and slice off a pickle slice off the top piece and bottom piece. Wrap the cactus gently but firmly with cotton string, your common classroom white string is perfect for this. Wind the string around the cactus avoiding the spines, ...


6

My first piece of advice is that you should get used to the idea that some branches sole purpose is to hold foliage that make the trunk thicker or just help the tree from getting bigger. Once that purpose has been accomplished you should simply discard it - it is of no use any longer. There are, however, many circumstances in which the plant will not ...


6

Almost all scions are from older trees than the rootstock, except when topworking an old tree to change variety. Then again, scions are generally the "less than 1 year old" wood from the older tree, for best success when grafting. It will probably make no difference in time of fruiting. In some cases of precocious fruit set (within 1 or 2 years of ...


6

No can do, sorry. The trunk is called 'root stock' and it isn't the same as the grafted canopy. The canopy is actually a prostrate form of the cherry tree. It would grow flat on the ground if it had been left alone at the nursery. They select for the prostrate form to create lots of different kinds of 'weeping' trees. When young the prostrate form is ...


6

There is direct contact between the two cambium layers - the removed bud has cambium (meristematic tissue) exposed on the cut side, and the T cut made in the stem it's to be grafted to has the bark or exterior tissue peeled back to reveal the cambium prior to insertion of the bud, as clearly demonstrated in the video you linked with. Whether the T cut in the ...


6

Usually we reserve the term "sucker" to shoots arising from below the graft, and "water shoots" for those arising above the graft. The difference is that suckers allow inferior root stock vegetation to take over, eventually overwhelming the tree. Water shoots are the proper scion material, but in terms of quality and quantity of fruit produced (which is ...


5

No, this will not work. Grafting only works reliably between species/genera,and sometimes between families. Pomegranates are not closely related to apples, so this will not work. Additionally, grafting onto hardy rootstock does not change the vulnerability to cold in the scion. The actual graft area will actually be more susceptible to cold than the rest of ...


5

sure you can add a bud graft anywhere, but you generally want to prune the branch that you are grafting to, so the bud is stimulated to grow.


5

Here's how grafted a black gold cherry tree onto an overgrown Gisela 6 plant. I used to graft fruit trees fairly often for the (now nonexistent) nursery. So I had this one Gisela 6 rootstock plant, which had grown to about 7' high. I cut all the branches off at 1" diameter (there were three main ones). I used variant on spliced side (more on that below) to ...


5

Quick summary Improving growing conditions only contributes minimally to your cherry tree's fruit size Your neighbour's tree has a genetic advantage over your tree in terms of fruit size You can bud graft a branch from your neighbour's tree onto yours The best time to do this is from July 15 to August 15 Your own tree should have bark that slips easily The ...


5

It is possible to buy citrus trees with more than one variety grafted to it. See here and here. Note that the first link talks about incapability problems. And all of these trees are considered to be the same species. So I'm going to answer "no", it's not possible in practice, with current grafting techniques. You can get a few varieties grafted onto one ...


5

Miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) belongs to the Sapotaceae family, and you'd need host roots from a plant within that family, though whether there are any suitable or compatible isn't something I know. But why not grow it in a pot - it's said to do well and fruit in containers, given the right conditions, even though it won't achieve its full, in the ...


5

IIRC, anything from the "Prunus" family, which includes plums, apricots, peaches, nectarines, and almonds as well as cherries. My personal rootstock preference is for "Mazzard" but that may depend on your soil type. The link I revised the Mazzard mention to point to does note some specific cultivars having issues with specific rootstocks other than Mazzard,...


5

It is certain that they were grafted, but I see no indication of graft failure. Root grafts fail over time because of a difference in growth rates between the root stock and the cultivar/scion. Typically the root stock grows to a much larger diameter and a line of separation appears at the joint - a physical crack through the bark that eventually goes almost ...


5

I'm sorry to say there's probably nothing you can do to change the situation. It sounds as if the lime part of the grafted tree is failing because it doesn't have enough vascular tissue to conduct nutrients and water to the upper parts, which is why it's displaying poor growth, whereas the lemon part is completely healthy. There may be a failure at the ...


4

This is a 'suck it and see' type thing. If the top of the tree is growing away nicely, and looking healthy, chances are the wound has completely healed. I'd remove the tape, carefully, but have more at the ready. Have a good look at it - if it looks healed, then chance leaving it, but if you're worried at all, reapply more tape. Removing what's there and ...


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