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19

Preface: This answer is based solely on the search result. I'm not a gardener and I don't have any gardening knowledge to sufficiently answer this with full certainty. Looking at the picture, it seems the most prevalent thing is the blackening of the core. Researching that gave results to a similar symptom from Alternaria/Black rot. This is caused by ...


15

Looks like pomegranate, or Punica granatum. Pretty common fruit, you can even find it in the supermarket.


14

A healthy strawberry runner is considered to be a "new" plant. Many of the long-term strawberry beds I've read about use runners as a way of renewing the beds every year or every other year, and as a result, the bed itself produces for quite a long time. To maintain the quality and productivity of the berry patch, the planting must be renovated each ...


14

"Calorically dense"? Look at fruits. Apples, brambles (raspberry/blackberry), currants, strawberries, blueberries. Pie cherries (sweet will depend on your microclimate, pie are hardier), apricots, plums. These folks think you are wrong about soy: The soybean, agriculture's jack-of-all-trades, is gaining ground across Canada. Until the mid-1970s, ...


13

That is Mock Strawberry, Duchesnea indica. The fruits are edible, but rather tasteless. This is a common weed in much of the United States. Look for small, strawberry-like plants in your lawn, with long stolons connecting the individual crowns. These plants have five petaled yellow flowers. See comparison photos:


12

Are you familiar with John Jeavons? If not, I highly recommend checking him out. I think his "How to Grow More Vegetables" is still the best resource for this type of information. Unfortunately, I can't find my copy right now, but I do have a smaller, less detailed book of his on hand, and this is what he says: If you compare all of the foods we commonly ...


12

This activity is called "gleaning". A word you will find in the Bible. For example, "And when ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not make clean riddance of the corners of thy field when thou reapest, neither shalt thou gather any gleaning of thy harvest: thou shalt leave them unto the poor, and to the stranger: I am the Lord your God." King ...


12

Definitely looks like something from a sci fi/horror movie! Black areas within oranges are usually caused by a fungal pathogen - it enters most often at the 'navel' end of the orange and then spreads inside the fruit in varying degrees. It most often spreads up the central area, but can appear as small black areas in some of the cells of the orange. However,...


11

Depending on where you live there could be a compatible cherry near enough that you will get fruit. Fortunately there are good resources out there to find good pollinators for stone fruit. Typically the male part of the flower will become active at a different part of time than the female part, to help eliminate self pollination, so variety X may be suitable ...


11

A picture would be nice. If the trees are young, they may not yet have an extensive enough root system and canopy to support all the fruit so you end up with lots of small fruit rather then larger specimens. And do you want growth wasted when they drop prematurely as the tree sheds those it can't support? Another reason is that low lying branches laden with ...


10

It's all genetic. Here is a list of the taxonomies of several common curcurbits: Watermelon: Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Violales Family: Curcurbitaceae Genus: Citrullus Species: lanatus Squash: Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Magnoliophyta Class:: Magnoliopsida Order: Violales Family: Curcurbitaceae Genus: Curcurbita ...


10

This is the Concord grape, which due to some diligent and patient planting and tasting of wild born vitis riperia vines one was discovered that tastes good for tables and juice and was named Concord. This is also the grape that was first used to make "grape flavor" but I think it is now synthesized.


10

Small fruiting tomatoes tend to be a lot juicier (that is ratio of meaty pulp to juice) than medium or large fruiting. Tomato produces a skin of a certain size for the number of fruits it has, then as b.nota points out extra water arrives. The fruit is already turgid, the extra water has nowhere to go but to burst the balloon. It is particularly a problem ...


10

There are two main causes of fruit split - the first is irregular watering. Once tomatoes have fruitlets, and especially as they start to get bigger and ripen, its critical to water sufficiently every day, without missing a day or two, or giving a bit less some days than others. If you don't, then the tomato, receiving a sudden influx of water, swells ...


9

That is Passiflora suberosa, or corky stem passionflower. The fruits are edible when ripe. They can contain small amounts of cyanide when green. Note that this is an invasive weed in some areas. References: 1. (cabi.org) http://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/38805 2. (toptropicals.com) http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/Passiflora_suberosa.htm 3. (...


9

Osage orange Maclura pomifera, a.k.a hedge-apple. a.k.a. Bois d'arc and further mangled to bodark. The latter set of names have to do with the wood's suitability for archery bows.


9

We get 30 litres of coffee grounds once a month from the local deli. We're on a list of people who take the stuff to stop it going into landfill. It just goes straight into our compost pile. Newly cooked grounds are sterile enough so can be used for growing some mushrooms, and they don't then get competition from other fungi. Some people use coffee ...


9

This is Solanum dulcamara, commonly "bittersweet nightshade"*, one of the more deadly weeds one might encounter. It's a member of the "nightshade" family, Solanaceae. You can see the resemblance in the fruit and leaves to tomatoes and peppers. It grows freely in reasonably dry soil, and especially likes somewhere that it can climb, like the fenced edge of ...


8

I believe that what you're describing is a type of citrus medica commonly known under many names such as Citron, Etrog, Esrog, Turanj, Bara Nimbu, e.t.c. and I'd guess they also come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. I've seen really odd octopus-like looking fingered etrog ones with their bottom half split into many arms or fingers, but most would look like ...


8

Pokeweed has a particular place in Southern North American ecology and folklife. To me, the methods to prepare it as food sound like detoxification more than cooking. In France it is probably best to mulch the plant, taking care to destroy the ripened seeds so they do not perpetuate the problem.


8

Well, technically, yes. You should always give them their first growing season free of fruiting. This encourages the plant to become more established than if you (like me) let them fruit the first year. Even if they grow roots in the fall, and some more in the spring, that's not the same as being established. It gives them a good head start to plant them in ...


8

Goji berry vines are highly susceptible to Powdery Mildew. In fact, I wouldn't recommend trying to grow them in the Pacific Northwest as it's too damp here. In 10 years of trying, they leaf out lushly, and about a month later start mildewing. Nothing you do will get rid of the mildew as it's a systemic problem with the plant. I've only ever gotten about ...


8

None of those are particularly "fast" examples. Radish is fast - 3 weeks to harvest for the small types. I don't like it much, but it's fast. You'd need to let some go to seed for seeds. Since your "not actually very fast" examples seem to mostly be things that are usually propagated by clone, potatoes, sweet potatoes/yams, shallots, sunchokes, ...


8

They are getting pollinated well enough, you can see the young fruit hips in those pictures. If there wasn't any fruit set, the ovaries would fall of the same time as the flower and you'd see no hips. Your problem is either lack of or too much nutrition and water. Wide temp swings can also cause infant fruit to fall off.


8

Just wash them all in clean tapwater - the hardest are the leafy greens, so the way to do that is immersion in a sink full of water, then picking out the leaves and running them directly under the tap, at the same time as inspecting for eggs and caterpillars. Then a salad spinner if you've got one, or just leave them to drain down in a colander. You may need ...


8

Think of how tomatoes grow "in the wild" fruit drops to the ground, slowly rots, and when conditions are right a new plant emerges. So cut open the fruit and cover it in soil, the results are not surprising. I don't see why this method wouldn't work for people who just want a "tomato". The types of people that will save seeds from store bought tomatoes and ...


8

What "full size" IS depends on what you do or don't do (and/or what "June-drop" does or not do for you.) More smaller fruit - don't thin. Less larger fruit - do thin. From the tree's point of view the smallest, seediest fruit that will still be considered edible by some animal who will transport the seeds elsewhere is "big enough." If you thin the fruit, ...


8

As well as the issue of small-sized fruit, another consequence of letting a tree over-crop by not thinning is that the tree may start a cycle of only producing a good crop once every two years. This problem affects apples and pears more than other tree fruits. Some varieties are more prone to "biennial bearing" than others, but curing it is difficult - ...


8

You did exactly what I would have recommended. Very ripe bananas especially. I'd enclose them together with the strawberries in a paper bag, close it off with very little airspace, and keep it at at least 75 degrees. Sometimes, however, the ripe part of a strawberry can overripen and begin to decay while part of that same fruit is still white. More common ...


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