14

"Calorically dense"? Look at fruits. Apples, brambles (raspberry/blackberry), currants, strawberries, blueberries. Pie cherries (sweet will depend on your microclimate, pie are hardier), apricots, plums. These folks think you are wrong about soy: The soybean, agriculture's jack-of-all-trades, is gaining ground across Canada. Until the mid-1970s, ...


12

Are you familiar with John Jeavons? If not, I highly recommend checking him out. I think his "How to Grow More Vegetables" is still the best resource for this type of information. Unfortunately, I can't find my copy right now, but I do have a smaller, less detailed book of his on hand, and this is what he says: If you compare all of the foods we commonly ...


10

Ooh, dear, sorry AvieRose, that's because there isn't a once and for all solution. Bindweed is practically impossible to eradicate, as you've discovered, so all you can hope for is to keep it in check. In light soils, it's often possible to extract the bulk of any root material when the area is unplanted, but in clay or heavy soils, it's much harder because, ...


10

All of the currant family (red, black, gooseberry, lingonberry...) do reasonably well in shade. High and low bush cranberry do well in shade. If you have light shade, look at nut trees. It will be a good while before they produce, but it's worth a look. Hickory, hazelnut, walnut, beechnut are possibilities. I recall that one of persimmon and pawpaw do ...


9

You are going to have a very difficult time growing much in the forest portion of your land. Yes, currants and gooseberries, black raspberries, and possibly sour cherries will tolerate the shade and fruit, but most things will not. As far as vegetables go, you should be able to grow leafy greens - especially in the spring before the trees have leafed out, ...


8

Some years ago I apparently eradicated bindweed from a small (15 x 7 feet) unenclosed front garden adjacent to the parking lot. I lived on an Estate where a number of small, bored children were always looking for something to do - so I offered a small bounty to the child who dug out the most convolvulus roots. The game was played every Sunday and roots had ...


8

From someone who grows a lot of their own food in a more northern climate, I would say that not only do you want calorie density, but you also need the ability to store long term. I would personally begin thinking of winter squashes (like butternut), beets, and potatoes. You should also look at long term (perennial) plants like Asparagus, rhubarb, apple ...


7

The only thing I want to add... You are fighting 2 battles, one against the plants, one against the seeds. You must never let it seed, or your eradication will be delayed by years. You should fight a pitched battle against a small area , maybe 20m by 10m for a year or 2, then advance. For the plants in my area, the main problem is that are dormant while I ...


7

It's impossible to say if it is an accurate number. The number you actually get could be anything between 200 and zero, if you get hit by disease or whatever. Seed merchants usually quote the maximum crop you are likely to get, for the obvious reason, and you never know whether bloggers are writing from their own experience or just copying something they ...


6

I have found that a good deterrent is to run chickens on a chosen piece of ground. They peck away any bits of green and the plant becomes exhausted. Same applies to Japanese knotweed, but you will still have to be vigilant if and when you move the chickens!


6

Back in the 1950's when gardeners were real gardeners (!) I remember my father successfully eliminated convolvulus from our suburban garden which was on heavy clay soil. He dug about five foot down along the fence and inserted galvanised sheeting where the convolvulus had come through from a neighbours garden and he then dug over the entire garden to about ...


6

I suspect that MOST of the cost is that this is a hassle/extra-labor item for the farmer (buying special boxes to put watermelons into, putting the boxes on the melons, etc.), rather than anything having to do with number of fruits per plant. It's a niche product and they will try to recover those costs as much as possible. Thinning/reducing the number of ...


6

You could plant sunchockes, otherwise called Jerusalem Artichoke, earth apple, topinambour. This was widely used during WW2 in remote campaign places in France at least. And it will grow beautiful flowers. If you leave nearer to the equator (e.g. the Peruvian Andes), you may simply grow potatoes! Yams may grow fibrous when getting old, but I recon you can ...


6

Very interesting question. There are a few dimensions that you might not have considered. First; anything grown from the earth is a carbohydrate. Should be at least 60% of our diet. Honest injun. I know plants well and the other thing I know really well is the human body. From a garden the only type of 'nutrient group' you will be dealing with is ...


5

No undergrowth forest plus creek makes me immediately think of allium ursinum (European variety) or allium tricoccum (US native). Both are happy to cover the forest floor in spring and disappear later in the year. If you are lucky, they take hold and propagate themselves. Not exactly a mass food source, but a spring kitchen staple for me. Used fresh in ...


5

An alternative approach that does not resort to herbicides would be to simply build the soil nutrition without tilling until it is no longer a good habitat for the opportunistic pioneer bindweed. From Toby Hemenway's book Gaia's Garden: Two or three seasons of tedious excavation of seemingly endless root networks didn't faze the morning glories (bindweed)...


5

I would sink a plastic barrier to stop any more of that root getting on your patch, corrogated plastic as one can bend onto shape round a corner and about 18 inches or more deep, secondly i would put jam jars of concentrated weedkiller around the edge- but be carefull and break any incoming stems and shove them in the jars the ends should in theory suck ...


5

The only 'negative effect' from planting culinary herbs together would be the differing sizes and growth rate related to the amount of space available for each plant. For the three you have specifically mentioned, Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a reasonably hardy, evergreen, woody shrub. Basil is a tender annual, and parsley is a hardy biennial, ...


5

Answering for your location (Minnesota, zone 4a), so as to keep this answer contained. In your climate, you'll get the most biomass from a summer season cover crop. Of course that will make it hard to grow food crops, unless you stagger beds, and use more square footage than you would need for a single food crop. The winter cover crops that aren't winter ...


5

If you want to be autonomous, you must plant various kind of crops. This will avoid you to starve if for some reason a disease or pest or bad weather destroy your yield of a given crop. So here is another idea: SunChoke; it's like potatoes, but need not to be replanted each year. Many material on our site about them (e.g. here ).


5

As others have mentioned, potatoes are probably your best bet in terms of calories per acre. If you use the trick of stacking soil as the plants grow up, you'll do even better. For variety, you can also grow sweet potatoes in southern Ontario. I've done it, and was surprised that it worked. Apparently they really love heat, so I put down transparent ...


5

You could try these: fennel (if you like the smell of licorice) anise (star anise is actually on the Wikipedia article for mulling spices; if you like licorice) dill blackberry leaves (they're quite good in herbal tea form; I believe they could improve the taste and smell of other drinks) roselle (it's said to be used to make and color a cranberry-like ...


4

There are a number of problems associated with growing edible plants near the road, as well as near cement, driveways and all that. Fly ash is an important ingredient of most cement, as well as other things (including potentially the road). Fly ash contains heavy metals. Plants could absorb these heavy metals. Here's what I would do: Put some kind of ...


4

There is not evidence either way about which taste better, and which have more nutrients. However, organic farming is generally associated with sustainable techniques which reduce or eliminate the amount of artificial inputs into the system. So if you are conscious of things like that, then organic is the way to go. I personally am an organic advocate, but I ...


4

The best fertilizer for potatoes in the choices listed above is the tomato and vegetable fertilizer. Generally, you should have the most phosphorous, then nitrogen, and the least potassium in the ratio. Potatoes are an underground crop, which means they need lots of phosphorous. In a container, they will require more nitrogen than in the ground, because it ...


4

I know where I from originally in the South Carolina sand hills, the Department of Transportation regularly sprays herbicide on the sides of the roads via a slow moving truck in order to stay the cost of roadside tree trimming. It is done more so in rural areas along dirt roads but if I were you, I would check to make sure it's not done in your area. See ...


4

Does juglone (an allelotoxin from black walnut) affect (positively or negatively) the yield of juglone tolerant crops? Look into allelopathy... it's talked about in this SE as well as around the internet. I'm certain that this is a long winded answer with lots of examples. In general, allelotoxins affect the field like the desert provides a life for cacti. ...


4

It's a miracle so many of us survived childhood. I drank from hoses all the time, and I've lived to tell the story. Even so, it's not a safe practice. As you know, there are several "drinking water safe" hoses out there. Using a reel, as I also do, is efficient, but does little to prevent the growth of bacteria in the residual water left in the hose. ...


4

Nuts of course, and some floor plants, will be naturals, but so as not to repeat others' answers, I thought I'd point out the issues/other things I noticed about your idea, rather than listing plants. No undergrowth means there isn't enough sun for the undergrowth. The lower tiers, and the floor, all depend on the amount of light let through the top canopy. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible