10

The second version of your asparagus question on sustainability.SE specifically asks about reducing water requirements: I have been looking into applying this with asparagus, to reduce water usage involved in growing this food, but have been unable to find recommendations for plants to plant alongside (and given the spacing between plants, this leads to a ...


7

Some things are annuals in some places (usually colder) and perennials in other places. And some people say things that are not strictly true. Tomatoes are perennials - in the tropics, or in a heated greenhouse. But we treat them as annuals in the colder regions, normally. I find "French sorrel" to be an unreliable perennial in my garden - I will get a few ...


6

That is why permaculture materials usually prefer drawings to photographs, IMHO. Drawings are neat and tidy. Reality varies. You can sheet mulch at any time. Horsetail will be with you for a while - it's a very persistent weed with deep roots. You might also try planting a smother crop like buckwheat (chop it before it seeds, or it becomes a weed itself.) ...


5

Looks like chocolate slime mold... Seriously... Also known as Stemonitopsis. It is normally feeding on dead trees, so I don't think it is causing your tree problems. If parts of your trees are dead (which they feed on) it has probably another cause.


4

About the only thing that will acidify soil over a period of years, and keep it so, are certain trees, mostly conifers, though it varies between species. The variation is accounted for by the presence of calcium in the leaves - the lower the calcium content, the more acid the soil will be. The link below might be of interest on this subject http://www....


4

Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) or Moringa, depending on what you want. Both plants will fix nitrogen and provide nutrient-dense edibles; they are perfect for chop and drop mulching too.


4

This isn't exactly what you are looking for, but I remember seeing not too long ago an article on a concept design for a greenhouse that used mangrove plants to desalinate water. The mangroves took up brackish water, then transpired (fresh) water vapor. The water vapor was collected off sides of the greenhouse. I know mangroves have also been planted in ...


4

I don't know of any software that can do it for you but I have posted instructions on designing your landscape with SketchUp on my site. My tutorial suggests you have a property survey of your home that you import into SketchUp, scale to the appropriate size and then trace over the features. I don't know about Spain but in the USA it's common to have a ...


4

In no order of importance: are small insects or animals going to find inside the pipes to be a nice place to nest or otherwise obstruct? are larger animals or people going to step on/trip/break the pipes? if it is dry for six months of the year wouldn't it be better to store even larger quantities of water? Yet this requires some kind of treatment or the ...


4

Did you this article on farming with seawater on CNN recently? http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/17/world/meast/qatar-sahara-forest-project/index.html?iid=article_sidebar They mention another plant that can be used to desalinate water, Limonium axillare. I think you might find the entire project interesting.


4

I don't have experience with this specific oak, but do have experience with the European oak (Quercus robur) in Europe. What I did is collecting the acorns in Autumn, collecting from the ground (not taken from the tree). I put these acorn directly in fresh potting soil, in a container which I left outdoors (so it will experience the winter temperatures just ...


3

The type of sorghum you'll want is known as sweet sorghum. The kind for food seed is known as grain sorghum. There's also broomcorn (sorghum for making brooms). Anyway, these are just classifications of sorghum—they're not breeds. It should be noted that sorghum is in the same family as corn, and looks a lot like it (but my plants weren't nearly as tall as ...


3

A traditional "mulberry bush" is 4 to 5 feet high which is easy enough to pick. You need to be aware they probably won't fruit at all till they are 10 years old, and the fruit season is only two or three weeks. But old trees and bushes look very nice, if you plan to keep them for 50 or 100 years. That is possibly why in Britain they were historically ...


3

I'm also not aware of any plants or other natural processes other than evaporation that can desalinate water. There is another green house that uses seawater. It pumps in salt water, uses solar energy to evaporate it and collects the condensate. The condensers are cooled by seawater as well. Some of the humid air escapes the greenhouse through the ...


3

I don't know the answer to your question on fungal counters, but if you have space for barrier plants between the walnuts and your other plantings, you might consider that. I've seen service berries and sumac named as effective barrier plants, and both are multi-functional plants appropriate for a food garden. Best of luck!


3

Acidic soils are great for potatoes, blueberries, hydrangea...but most vegetables do better in more neutral soils. There are no plants that actually DECREASE the pH of the soil PER SE. Whenever organic matter decomposes some acidity is produced but nothing that would make even a temporary change in the soil to make even blueberries happy. The best way to ...


3

Have a look at the OpenStreetMap tools - if it doesn't currently include your garden then you can follow the instructions on how to add it from the satellite imagery available.


3

Your asbuilt should show that. If you did not build the house, or you just don't have it, it should be on file with the town with either the building inspector or the assessor. You can scan that in to help start with a planning program.


3

According to a paper from 1954, the wild potato was considered a ruderal species. Although found in a wide range of habitats, most of the time they were found in places with disturbed vegetation. So it was most likely not a plant living in the shade of forests, but a ruderal species colonizing new disturbed areas where full sun was available. So for a good ...


3

You'd need enough chips to maintain a 6-8" depth for at least a few weeks. See this post (written by Linda Chalker-Scott, Washington State Extension) for complete instructions. To summarize (in case we ever lose that post): Scalp the lawn by cutting it as short as possible, preferably when it is not actively growing. Cover the lawn with a thick enough ...


2

Well, I suppose there's spagnum moss, but that will take even longer than the pines @Bamboo mentions, and it's not so much the growing as the decay that does most of the acidifying, though a certain amount of "locking up calcium and magnesium" is mentioned in the wikipedia article. While the classic commercial blueberry barrens are lowland bog-type ...


2

This makes me think of a few permaculture tools that love woody food sources: Goats - they love to eat things head level and above Sheep - they love to eat woody things head level and below After a few years of using these animals along with chickens to keep the grass down they will kill off anything living in the area if you provide enough animals to ...


2

I would suggest going back to the permaculture layering technique. First no-dig digging of course brings seeds to the surface where they will germinate. 2nd at a 2-3 inch layer of compost which you have made on your site. This will hold moisture in the soil. Next is the weed barrier I have found that cardboard works better than newspaper where you need at ...


2

Now that I see the photo, I think you should trim the plants, before they produce seeds. It takes time (as long period), but it is simpler than taking every plant apart. I would in any case remove the larger weeds manually, as soon as possible. Weed killer could also help, e.g. with a total reset of garden, but I would use as last resort, but maybe you can ...


2

I'm not sure that "potatoes wanting full sun" is a misconception - there's a few things to take into account here. The major thing being context. Background: Being that it is 2019, that potatoes have been cultivated for between three and seven thousand years and that potatoes are the 5th most important crop worldwide(meaning that it is massively produced), ...


2

You won’t love the Moles after you have ruined a few lawnmower blades. I don’t recommend encouraging a mole infestation. If you allow a population to really get established, your lawn will be the source of other people’s problems. I think it better to plant something the grubs won’t eat. I happen to like like Dutch White Clover. The grubs don’t eat it and it ...


2

One source I've read (wish I could remember where it was so I could reference it here) stated that a typical mole's diet is 75% earthworms and 25% grubs of all kinds, so your moles are probably going after the worms in your yard.


1

Well, you could consider using some form of bindweed. It is a common hardy "weed" that usually grows white or blue flowers. It can be a great ground cover and requires very minimal maintenance. It's roots usually grow about 2-3 inches below the surface and are incredibly easy to remove, they usually grow straight down as well. Another option would be a ...


1

There are a few problems with that idea: Don't tread on any insects (e.g. ants) that will bite your feet. Likewise, don't tread on any bird droppings etc! The creeping plants won't stop at suppressing the weeds, they will also suppress your other plants when they are still small. If the creeping plants aren't strong growing enough to behave like "weeds" ...


1

Paul Stamets talks about erosion control of old logging tracks using substrate inoculated with oyster mushroom spawn. Our intention is to prevent further bank erosion as well as filter the flow of silt-enriched water. We arranged for the delivery of 'hog-fuel', a crude mixture of bark, wood chips, and fir needles, in 10-yard loads. North Mason Fiber donated ...


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