10

The label for this product does not recommend applying grass seed until four weeks after the last application. Once this waiting period is up buy or acquire: a big bag of grass seed suitable for the light and soil in your lawn enough compost or top soil to cover the sparse areas to a depth of 1/4" to 1/2" Then Use a rake to open up the soil. Apply grass ...


9

Vinegar acts as a desiccant. It dissolves the protective coating on the leaves of the plant causing it to dry out and die if the temperatures are warm enough. It usually doesn't destroy the roots and sometimes the plant may come back if there is enough energy in the root system. Dandelions have a large taproot which makes them difficult to kill with ...


7

I haven't tried this, but I might take a two-pronged approach: Squirt a little vinegar down the hole -- maybe 5mL with a child's medicine dropper to get it down in the hole. I don't know if 5mL is enough to really do anything to the dandelion, but it shouldn't be enough to cause collateral damage. IANAL, but I can't imagine that vinegar qualifies as a ...


6

Probably not. The active ingredient in the new iron-based weedkillers is a specific iron chelate - specifically, iron HEDTA (Hydroxyethyl Ethylenediamine Triacetic Acid). AFAICT, this isn't used in diet supplements. I wouldn't try using the weedkiller as a diet supplement, either. ;-)


6

How To Get Rid of Dandelions: The best way to get rid of dandelions is to remove them by hand. The key is to get all, or as much as possible, of the long taproot, since the plant can regenerate from any root pieces that remain in the soil. Water the area the day before you plan to weed, then use a long, narrow tool, such as a flat screwdriver or ...


5

Yes, he is right - you need to remove all the tap root, right down to the pointy bit at the end, or it will regrow, usually producing a 'double' plant, that is, with two lots of leaves as if there are now two plants.


5

It is difficult to answer the question of whether or not it is safe to eat dandelions or other plants that have been treated with this herbicide. You'd have to know how much iron the plant has actually absorbed in the part you intend to eat and whether that amount of iron would harm you. The main ingredient is chelated iron. Chelated iron is sometimes ...


5

How much salt did you use? What was the ratio of salt to vinegar in your anti-dandelion solution? Grass in general likes neutral to alkaline soil, and salt is anathema to most plants in general (although not all) so these will need to be either 1) diluted until it is no longer an issue or 2) counteracted in some way before the grass will be able to grow ...


4

Let me just preface this by saying that I remember when I took that photo (which, based on the time stamp, was back in April 2013), I had searched on the internet with no success: various searches by image failed, and searches using keywords like "dandelion" or "star dandelion" were hopelessly futile. And just by sheer luck, Ben Welborn's comment ...


4

So no presents for you under the plastic then! I'm glad really - that larvae you found could be the larvae of a moth or butterfly because its not immediately recognisable as a leatherjacket, but might have been. What's odd is you found it actually under the lawn, and that isn't at all typical of moth larvae. First, I'd note that your lawn is cut way too ...


4

At the old house I would often pull the flower heads (technically not dead-heading, as they were in full bloom) and the buds when I saw them. I would discard on the lawn. If the flower heads had (or could develop) seeds in that form, then I think I would have had an explosion of dandelions! As it was, I was able to keep them in check with just a few which ...


4

Yes, dandelions are the only flower I know of that will develop seed after they are picked. I generally pick my dandies into a large plastic pail, and when I let the pail sit for several days and then check it, some (not all) of the flowers will develop into seedheads. It may have to do with what stage you pick them at, but I am not sure what exactly was the ...


4

To understand why you have dandelions in the first place goes a long way into preventing them. A dandelion is not a "weed" it is what is known as a Pioneer Plant. Pioneer species are hardy species which are the first to colonize previously disrupted or damaged ecosystems, beginning a chain of ecological succession that ultimately leads to a more ...


4

Dandelions grow on poor compacted soil. The soil can be poor or clay soil with drainage problems. They successfully grow where the grass struggles a bit. Whilst it would be less hassle to just re-seed grass, it probably won't improve the growing conditions (soil) and dandelions are likely to return. I would suggest ripping the soil and adding whatever is ...


3

You can kill some weeds by depriving them of sunlight but it takes a while. Why not let modern technology make your job easier? Something like this water powered weeder works well for good soil and weeds with deep tap roots. There are many other innovative solutions for dandelions out there that work immediately. If you try the "heart of darkness" ...


3

Most weeds are opportunists. If your grass is not doing well, weeds will proliferate. Aerate your lawn by pulling plugs of soil out of your lawn. Go over it as many times as you can. Allow the plugs to disintegrate on top of your...lawn. Get a soil test done. Find out what nutrients are low, high, acceptable and what the pH of your soil is...do you ...


3

I disagree that this method is not practical. If you had a look at the size of my garden you will see that it does work. An important step is to behead all dandelion flowers before they go to seed to minimise the volume of seeds. Of course there will always be influx of seeds from neighbours lawns who don't bother to keep them under control and the important ...


3

I know it seems like I'm carrying the "calcium" flag on this site as it seems calcium is the answer to almost any problem, but once again, if you want to be rid of dandelions, check your calcium levels: "The lawn on the left received applications of high-calcium limestone and gypsum; the lawn on the right did not." Read more at: http://www.safelawns.org/...


3

Nobody touched on a few points to help control dandelion and thistle so I thought I'd add my 2cents even though this is an old thread. Also I'm curious how you made out since this is an old thread. Dandelions grow well in alkaline soil which most grasses do not. If your soil is alkaline your grass could be thinning leaving room for dandelion to grow. Do a ...


3

The vinegar will persist in those spots as a lower pH soil. Vinegar is used as an herbicide (a much higher percentage than what we use in salads) and prevents anything from being able to grow...great for driveways for instance. All one has to do is add lime to get it back into the pH range to grow plants again. I would dig out the dead grass and soil, ...


3

Over time,your lawn will become largely a mix of dandelions and clover, because both will out compete the grass for nutrients and water. Since you don't use any chemical treatments, you could harvest the dandelion leaves and use them in salads or in cooking generally, they're a very useful source of healthy greens. Some varieties of clover can be eaten, but '...


3

The earth looks very compact and doesnt from the photos look like there is a good level of good quality top soil. for me, you need to get some good soil, compost and gypsum on top. poke holes and losen the ground and concentrate on the soil. once that is good, grass will be easier to get going. I have tried many times to bring lawns back and its much ...


2

I would recommend working on the basics first before trying to repair the lawn. Firstly, I would remove all the weeds in the lawn and secondly I would fertilize the lawn. Also, make sure you are watering the lawn regularly as needed. You should start seeing the lawn improve quite a bit just from that. Then, if patches remain, you can try to repair the ...


2

I deadheaded the dandelions in my lawn a couple of years ago, tossing the yellow flowers into the grass. Much to my surprise, and chagrin, I later found that many of them had continued to develop into the seed stage, despite being plucked. Now I gather them up into a little cup and throw them in the trash. Can anyone recommend a good tool for digging ...


2

Of course you can. But they are dangerous for the lawn, because they are perennial and very invasive. The plant consists of a tuft of leaves alway wider, covering the grass and cause it to die. In addition it has a long taproot, quite deep. If you decide you no longer want dandelions in your lawn, you will need to dig a long time to remove them all. Do not ...


2

Chances are, you didn't get the whole thing out. But you probably got enough of it out so that when/if it does re-grow, it will be a much smaller plant. The only way to make sure the entire thing is dead is to spray it with something that will get absorbed into the plant and kill it. But that's not nearly as satisfying as ripping them out. Edit: One ...


2

Probably, but it takes forever. Honest. Just uproot them, it's easier.


1

I lost a lawn in my first house to weeds; I could not water enough with my well to keep the grass healthy. I sold the house with no lawn in the backyard; I had pulled everything out. I had better luck in my 2nd house with town water; since the lawn was new with the house, it never developed weeds. In my current house, there are weeds, so I put down Halts in ...


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