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4

If it was a fungus it was not the only reason for your poor lawn. There are other things far more important as to why your lawn looks like this. Unhealthy grasses are very susceptible to fungus, insects...disease. I have to assume this is cool season grass. Where is it your live on this planet? Here is a check list of what I am worried about: Not enough ...


4

So no presents for you under the plastic then! I'm glad really - that larvae you found could be the larvae of a moth or butterfly because its not immediately recognisable as a leatherjacket, but might have been. What's odd is you found it actually under the lawn, and that isn't at all typical of moth larvae. First, I'd note that your lawn is cut way too ...


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These look to me like Cockchafer larvae. they eat a lot! They thrive here in your pot because they found perfect breathing and rich humus for them. They are harmful to many veggies you can grow in your yard, and can even harm small plants and bushes, because they eat the roots sometimes. You don't need pesticide to get rid of them, though. They are easy to ...


3

The earth looks very compact and doesnt from the photos look like there is a good level of good quality top soil. for me, you need to get some good soil, compost and gypsum on top. poke holes and losen the ground and concentrate on the soil. once that is good, grass will be easier to get going. I have tried many times to bring lawns back and its much ...


2

I would recommend working on the basics first before trying to repair the lawn. Firstly, I would remove all the weeds in the lawn and secondly I would fertilize the lawn. Also, make sure you are watering the lawn regularly as needed. You should start seeing the lawn improve quite a bit just from that. Then, if patches remain, you can try to repair the ...


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No, over watering will not control 'grubs'. You just have to send pictures of these grubs, fruit trees... Where is it that you live? Do NOT overwater. Allow the birds to eat these grubs, the moles, the voles, the shrews...need to know exactly what insect with which you are dealing. Get a big bowl or bucket of water and squirt a bunch of dish soap into ...


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Appears this is some sort of Rhinoceros (Dynastidae) Beetle. Information is mixed between the different subspecies. It could be the Hercules (Dynastes tityus) beetle or Ox (Strategus aloeus) beetle. One thing that seems common between them all is that they are very big as grubs. Also as grubs they prefer woody soil, which explains why I found this guy in ...


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Whilst larvae or maggots won't do any harm in the composting material, if the container is near your home or indoors, you might want to discourage those. Larvae eventually turn into things that fly, and you might not want those in or near the home. If you want to get rid of them, pick out all you can see, then apply a layer 2-4 inches thick of dry browns, ...


2

This looks like a leather jacket, a crane fly larva. To answer your question, no, they are not one of the decomposers. These guys eat decomposed organic matter and in this case the crowns of grasses. Thus finding them in your decomposing compost. The worst thing you could do is use any pesticide for this, I am dead serious. I can explain if you ask ...


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They look like the pupal stage of vine weevil larvae I'm afraid, and they do eat plant roots - did you notice any notched holes on leaves of plants in the pots, previously or now? These sorts of holes (usually round the edges of plant leaves) are typical of adult vine weevil. Either way,they are not something you want in your pots; you can use a nematode ...


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The worst thing you could do and perhaps have already done is kill the grubs. The soil is naturally imbued with predators and control systems of grubs. I am assuming you might be in the NW with Cranefly grubs? Is this correct? When you use that grub kill stuff? Next year your lawn will be decimated completely because you not only killed the grubs you ...


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Chafer grub or beetle grub I believe - in the UK, it would be chafer, but where you are, difficult to be 100% sure whether its chafer or beetle. I don't think its Japanese beetle, but they are quite similar, except that Japanese beetle grubs have very short bristles on the body. Even chafer grubs usually have orange legs and head, but sometimes can look ...


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